100 Flowers and How They Got Their Names

Here she presents one hundred well-known garden favorites and the not-so-well-known stories behind their names. Not for gardeners only, this is a book for anyone interested not just in the blossoms, but in the roots, too.

100 Flowers and How They Got Their Names

The gardening writer and author of Lives of the Trees explores the fascinating stories behind the names of one hundred flowers in this beautifully illustrated book. Since the Garden of Eden, people have found pleasure and purpose in giving names to plant life. And our relationship to flowers, as food, medicine, magic, adornment, and decoration, goes back long before recorded history. From Baby Blue Eyes to Silver Bell, from Abelia to Zinnia, every flower tells a story. Gardening writer Diana Wells knows them all. Here she presents one hundred well-known garden favorites and the not-so-well-known stories behind their names. Not for gardeners only, this is a book for anyone interested not just in the blossoms, but in the roots, too. With illustrations by Ippy Patterson.

100 Birds and How They Got Their Names

Diana Wells. Also by Diana Wells 100 Flowers and How They Got Their Names 100BIRDS and How They Got Their Names Diana Wells Illustrated.

100 Birds and How They Got Their Names

How did cranes come to symbolize matrimonial happiness? Why were magpies the only creatures that would not go inside Noah's Ark? Birds and bird imagery are integral parts of our language and culture. With her remarkable ability to dig up curious and captivating facts, Diana Wells hatches a treat for active birders and armchair enthusiasts alike. Meet the intrepid adventurers and naturalists who risked their lives to describe and name new birds. Learn the mythical stories of the gods and goddess associated with bird names. Explore the avian emblems used by our greatest writers--from Coleridge's albatross in "The Ancient Mariner" to Poe's raven. A sampling of the bird lore you'll find inside: Benjamin Franklin didn't want the bald eagle on our National Seal because of its "bad moral character," (it steals from other birds); he lobbied for the turkey instead. Chaffinches, whose Latin name means "unmarried," are called "bachelor birds" because they congregate in flocks of one gender. Since mockingbirds mimic speech, some Native American tribes fed mockingbird hearts to their children, believing it helped them learn language. A group of starlings is called a murmuration because they chatter so when they roost in the thousands. Organized alphabetically, each of these bird tales is accompanied by a two-color line drawing. Dip into 100 Birds and you'll never look at a sparrow, an ostrich, or a wren in quite the same way.

Lives of the Trees

The author of 100 Flowers and How They Got Their Names now explores our deep-rooted relationship with trees in this beautifully illustrated book.

Lives of the Trees

The author of 100 Flowers and How They Got Their Names now explores our deep-rooted relationship with trees in this beautifully illustrated book. In Lives of Trees, gardening author Diana Wells reminds us of just how innately bound we are to trees. For as long as humans walked the earth, we have depended on them for food, shade, shelter, and fuel—not to mention furniture, musical instruments, medicine, utensils, and more. Investigating the names and meanings of trees, Wells also uncovers their fascinating legends and lore: At one time, a worm found in a hazelnut meant ill fortune; Rowan trees were planted in churchyards to prevent the dead from rising from their graves; Greek arrows were soaked in deadly yew; and Shakespeare’s witches in Macbeth used “Gall of goat and slips of yew” to make their lethal brew. One bristlecone pine, at about forty-seven hundred years old, is thought to be the oldest living plant on earth. All this and more can be found in the beautifully illustrated pages (themselves born of birch bark!) of Lives of Trees.

Official State Flowers and Trees

... Edward Waters, Finding Anything about Everything in Texas Fred Hageneder, The Meaning of Trees Chronicle Books, 2005 Diana Wells, 100 Flowers and How They Got Their Names, Algonquin Books of Chapel Hill, 1997 Elizabeth Silverthorne, ...

Official State Flowers and Trees

Official State Flowers and Trees: Their Unique Stories arranges the histories of the trees and flowers chosen by each of the states and territories of the United States into an entertaining, informative, and comprehensive guide to the honored species. Over the years, Americans have approached the choices of naming their states and territories official choices with passion. In this guide, Glynda Joy Nord explores the details of these intriguing stories and, with a plant-lovers touch, holds up each tree and flower, revealing the distinctive elements of each choice. Dedicating a chapter to each state and territory, Official State Flowers and Trees presents the flowers and trees through detailed line drawings, followed by the unique stories that tell how people came to choose them and what physical traits they found attractive. Additional background stories delve into the poetry, mythology, history, and biology tied to each species. You may see references to state flowers and trees on license plates, old postage stamps, state seals, and commemorative coins. You might notice the trees and flowers around you as you travel. If you then begin to wonder about the stories of those plants, then Official State Flowers and Trees: Their Unique Stories will help you satisfy your curiosity as you learn about their beauty, their histories, and the decisions that made them this countrys official symbols.

The Inclusion of Environmental Education in Science Teacher Education

Virginia Tech (dendrology): The meanings of Latin names • http://www.cnr. vt.edu/dendro/dendrology/syllabus/meanings.cfm Wells, D. & Patterson, I. (1997). • 100 Flowers and how they got their names. New York, NY: Algonquin.

The Inclusion of Environmental Education in Science Teacher Education

In the coming decades, the general public will be required ever more often to understand complex environmental issues, evaluate proposed environmental plans, and understand how individual decisions affect the environment at local to global scales. Thus it is of fundamental importance to ensure that higher quality education about these ecological issues raises the environmental literacy of the general public. In order to achieve this, teachers need to be trained as well as classroom practice enhanced. This volume focuses on the integration of environmental education into science teacher education. The book begins by providing readers with foundational knowledge of environmental education as it applies to the discipline of science education. It relates the historical and philosophical underpinnings of EE, as well as current trends in the subject that relate to science teacher education. Later chapters examine the pedagogical practices of environmental education in the context of science teacher education. Case studies of environmental education teaching and learning strategies in science teacher education, and instructional practices in K-12 science classrooms, are included. This book shares knowledge and ideas about environmental education pedagogy and serves as a reliable guide for both science teacher educators and K-12 science educators who wish to insert environmental education into science teacher education. Coverage includes everything from the methods employed in summer camps to the use of podcasting as a pedagogical aid. Studies have shown that schools that do manage to incorporate EE into their teaching programs demonstrate significant growth in student achievement as well as improved student behavior. This text argues that the multidisciplinary nature of environmental education itself requires problem-solving, critical thinking and literacy skills that benefit students’ work right across the curriculum.

My Therapist s Dog

Lessons in Unconditional Love Diana Wells. ALSO BY DIANA WELLS 100 Flowers and How They Got Their Names 100 Birds and How They Got Their Names MY THERAPIST'S DOG D Lessons in Unconditional Love DIANA WELLS.

My Therapist s Dog

Diana Wells's intriguing exploration into the rewards of relationships--both the canine and human varieties--begins when she reluctantly starts seeing a psychologist, Beth, during a difficult time in her life. With no insurance to pay for counseling, a barter is arranged in which the client becomes part-time caretaker to the therapist's dog, Luggs, a sweet, clumsy black Labrador retriever. As Wells examines her past--her peripatetic childhood, her eccentric family, her grief over the deaths of loved ones--Luggs provides a bridge between therapist and patient. Dog lover by nature, historian by trade, Wells finds herself curious about the connections that dogs and humans have shared for centuries--and what these bonds tell us about our own psyches. Wells observes that training a dog has much in common with the therapeutic techniques her psychologist employs. Looking into recent experiments that have proved dogs better at interpreting human behavior than chimps or wolves, Wells explores the subtleties of her own relationship with dogs. Increasingly she finds herself agreeing with Diogenes, the original Greek cynic (the word cynic comes from the greek kuon, meaning "dog"), who said that unless we think like dogs, happiness will elude us. Wells analyzes what we name our dogs, how we breed them, how we've explored the wilderness with them, the kinds of literature we write about them, why we love them, and, most important, what we can learn from them. When an unexpected illness befalls Beth, Luggs comforts the two women, and his devotion helps Wells come to accept that relationships--despite the possibility of hurt and pain--are what life is all about.

A History of Zinnias

100 Flowers and How They Got Their Names. Chapel Hill, NC: Algonquin Books of Chapel Hill. Weston, Richard. 1772. The Universal Botanist and Nurseryman, Vol. 3. London: J. Bell. White, Emma V. 1899. Choice Flower Seeds.

A History of Zinnias

A History of Zinnias brings forward the fascinating adventure of zinnias and the spirit of civilization. With colorful illustrations, this book is a cultural and horticultural history documenting the development of garden zinnias—one of the top ten garden annuals grown in the United States today. The deep and exciting history of garden zinnias pieces together a tale involving Aztecs, Spanish conquistadors, people of faith, people of medicine, explorers, scientists, writers, botanists, painters, and gardeners. The trail leads from the halls of Moctezuma to a cliff-diving prime minister; from Handel, Mozart, and Rossini to Gilbert and Sullivan; from a little-known confession by Benjamin Franklin to a controversy raised by Charles Darwin; from Emily Dickinson, who writes of death and zinnias, to a twenty-year-old woman who writes of reanimated corpses; and from a scissor-wielding septuagenarian who painted with bits of paper to the “Black Grandma Moses” who painted zinnias and inspired the opera Zinnias. Zinnias are far more than just a flower: They represent the constant exploration of humankind’s quest for beauty and innovation.

Gardening with Heirloom Seeds

Tried-and-True Flowers, Fruits, and Vegetables for a New Generation Lynn Coulter. Watson, Benjamin. ... 100 Vegetables and Where They Came From. Chapel Hill, N.C.: Algonquin Books, 2000. ... 100 Flowers and How They Got Their Names.

Gardening with Heirloom Seeds

Heirloom seeds are more than the promise of next summer's crookneck squash or jewel-colored zinnias. They're living antiques handed down from one generation to the next, a rich inheritance of flavor and beauty from long ago and, often, far away. They are sometimes better adapted to pests and harsh conditions than many modern varieties and often simply smell or taste better. Gardening with Heirloom Seeds serves as a resource for gardeners, cooks, and plant lovers of all levels of expertise who want to know more about finding, sharing, and propagating the seeds of heirloom flowers, fruits, and vegetables. In these beautifully illustrated pages, Lynn Coulter describes fifty treasured heirloom species, from Frenchman's Darling, a flowering herb whose seeds were pocketed by Napoleon Bonaparte when he invaded Egypt in 1798, to Snow White beets, an old Dutch favorite that will not stain the cook's fingers red. Most of the plants included here will grow all across the United States; a few are best suited for warmer climates. The text is sprinkled throughout with practical advice from heirloom gardeners and lists sources for finding the seeds of many old varieties. Because it also provides ample room for making notes, Gardening with Heirloom Seeds can be used year after year and can become an heirloom in its own right--a personal journal to pass along to the next generation of gardeners.

RHS Latin for Gardeners

Over 3,000 Plant Names Explained and Explored Royal Horticultural Society. Neal, Bill. Gardener's Latin. ... Name That Plant An Illustrated Guide to Plant and Botanical Latin Names. ... 100 Flowers and How They Got Their Names.

RHS Latin for Gardeners

Aided by this book the gardener can now answer the question "What's in a name?" and they and their garden will benefit from understanding the wealth of information that has hitherto lain hidden within the mysterious world of Latin names.' - Financial Times Online RHS Latin for Gardeners is an informative, entertaining and beautifully illustrated unravelling of the mysteries of botanical Latin. Over 3,000 Latin names are listed alphabetically, showing how plant names can reveal where a plant originally comes from (and thus its preferred growing conditions), along with such properties as its shape, form, colour, taste, and smell. Each name is clearly defined and accompanied by a pronunciation guide, and the pages are filled with attractive botanical illustrations. Fascinating feature spreads retell the adventures of important plant hunters such as Sir Joseph Banks and Alexander von Humboldt, and explain how their discoveries affect the way our gardens look today. Individual plants are also profiled throughout, showing how their names can illuminate their hidden histories. Aided by this book, every gardener, and their garden, will benefit from uncovering the wealth of information that lies within the remarkable world of Latin binomials. A little Latin can do a lot of good - apply the lore of Latin to your own garden! Contents includes... The A-Z Listings of Latin Plant Names Plant Profiles Plant Hunters Plant Themes ...And Much More!

Latin for Gardeners

Stearn, William T. Stearn'sDictionary of PlantNamesfor Gardeners: A Handbook on the Origin and Meaning oftheBotanical Names ofSome Cultivated Plants. London: Cassell, 1996. Wells, Diana. 100 Flowers and How They Got TheirNames.

Latin for Gardeners

Since Latin became the standard language for plant naming in the eighteenth century, it has been intrinsically linked with botany. And while mastery of the classical language may not be a prerequisite for tending perennials, all gardeners stand to benefit from learning a bit of Latin and its conventions in the field. Without it, they might buy a Hellebores foetidus and be unprepared for its fetid smell, or a Potentilla reptans with the expectation that it will stand straight as a sentinel rather than creep along the ground. An essential addition to the gardener’s library, this colorful, fully illustrated book details the history of naming plants, provides an overview of Latin naming conventions, and offers guidelines for pronunciation. Readers will learn to identify Latin terms that indicate the provenance of a given plant and provide clues to its color, shape, fragrance, taste, behavior, functions, and more. Full of expert instruction and practical guidance, Latin for Gardeners will allow novices and green thumbs alike to better appreciate the seemingly esoteric names behind the plants they work with, and to expertly converse with fellow enthusiasts. Soon they will realize that having a basic understanding of Latin before trips to the nursery or botanic garden is like possessing some knowledge of French before traveling to Paris; it enriches the whole experience.

Deer Resistant Landscaping

Portland, OR: Timber Press, 2007. The book that is revolutionizing the way gardeners and landscape designers think aboutplant selection. Wells, Diana. 100 Flowers and How They Got Their Names. Chapel Hill, NC: Algonquin Books, 1997.

Deer Resistant Landscaping

Every year, before they decide to take defensive action, vulnerable homeowners throughout North America suffer expensive damage as deer and various other pesky mammals devour their gardens and landscape plants. Deer-Resistant Landscaping by Neil Soderstrom arms homeowners with the proven strategies they need to repel and combat deer and 21 other troubling pests, from armadillos, chipmunks, and gophers to rabbits, raccoons, skunks, and squirrels. Outstanding features include: • strategies for every season and every size pest—from simple, low-cost home remedies, scare tactics, and deterrents to live trapping, barriers, and community action procedures suitable for more intense problems • interviews with and tips from regional gardening and wildlife control experts from coast to coast • encyclopedic coverage of more than 1,000 resistant plants—especially those least likely to be grazed upon or destroyed by deer, based on scientific studies and a consensus of gardening authorities throughout the continent • stunning full-color wildlife photography featuring deer and pest behaviors as well as solutions and deterrents With more than 400 of the author's own gorgeous wildlife photos as well as ones by the legendary naturalist Dr. Leonard Lee Rue III, the most published wildlife photographer in North America, Deer-Resistant Landscaping provides the most wide-ranging, authoritative, and helpful information on this topic ever assembled in one volume.

Color the Wildflowers of the Rockies

The flower on the left has no double edge on its petals . RED / VIOLET : * Shooting Star PURPLE / BLUE ... 100 Flowers and How They Got Their Names ( Algonquin Books of Chapel Hill , 1997 ) . Discovering wildflowers growing near streams ...

Color the Wildflowers of the Rockies

Here is a way to bring home wildflowers without plucking them! Brief descriptions of appearance and habitat are included to enhance your observations and discoveries of the great, wild Rocky Mountains. Games and quizzes add to the fun. Flower close-ups and scenes help describe what to look for, and where to look.

A Companion to Impressionism

Flower Poetics in Nineteenth-Century France. Oxford: Clarendon. ... A Contemplation upon Flowers: Garden Plants in Myth and Literature. Portland, OR: Timber. Wells, D. (1997). 100 Flowers and How They Got Their Names.

A Companion to Impressionism

A Companion to Impressionism Presenting an expansive view of the study of Impressionism, this pioneering volume breaks new thematic ground while also reconsidering questions concerning the definition, chronology, and membership of the impressionist movement. In 34 original essays from established and emerging scholars, this collection offers a diverse range of developing topics and new critical approaches to the interpretation of impressionist art. Focusing on the 1860s to 1890s, A Companion to Impressionism explores artists who are well-represented in impressionist studies, including Monet, Renoir, Degas, and Cassatt, as well as Morisot, Caillebotte, Bazille, and other significant yet lesser-known artists. The essays cover a wide variety of methodologies in addressing such topics as Impressionism’s global predominance at the turn of the 20th century, the relationship between Impressionism and the emergence of new media, the materials and techniques of the Impressionists, as well as the movement’s exhibition and reception history. This innovative volume also includes new discussions of modern identity in Impressionism in the contexts of race, nationality, gender, and sexuality and through its explorations of the international reach and influence of Impressionism. Part of the acclaimed Wiley Blackwell Companions to Art History series, this important addition to scholarship in this field stands as the 21st century’s first major and large-scale academic reassessment of Impressionism. Featuring essays by academics, curators, and conservators from around the world, including those from France, Germany, the United States, the United Kingdom, Japan, Turkey, and Argentina, this is an invaluable text for students and scholars studying Impressionism and late 19th-century European art, Post-Impressionism, modern art, and modern French cultural history.

Describing Species

A Source-Book of Biological Names and Terms, 3d ed. ... Changes in North American fish names, especially as related to the International Code of Zoological Nomenclature, 1985. ... 100 Flowers and How They Got Their Names.

Describing Species

New species are discovered every day—and cataloguing all of them has grown into a nearly insurmountable task worldwide. Now, this definitive reference manual acts as a style guide for writing and filing species descriptions. New collecting techniques and new technology have led to a dramatic increase in the number of species that are discovered. Explorations of unstudied regions and new habitats for almost any group of organisms can result in a large number of new species discoveries—and hence the need to be described. Yet there is no one source a student or researcher can readily consult to learn the basic practical aspects of taxonomic procedures. Species description can present a variety of difficulties: Problems arise when new species are not given names because their discoverers do not know how to write a formal species description or when these species are poorly described. Biologists may also have to deal with nomenclatural problems created by previous workers or resulting from new information generated by their own research. This practical resource for scientists and students contains instructions and examples showing how to describe newly discovered species in both the animal and plant kingdoms. With special chapters on publishing taxonomic papers and on ecology in species description, as well as sections covering subspecies, genus-level, and higher taxa descriptions, Describing Species enhances any writer's taxonomic projects, reports, checklists, floras, faunal surveys, revisions, monographs, or guides. The volume is based on current versions of the International Codes of Zoological and Botanical Nomenclature and recognizes that systematics is a global and multicultural exercise. Though Describing Species has been written for an English-speaking audience, it is useful anywhere Taxonomy is spoken and will be a valuable tool for professionals and students in zoology, botany, ecology, paleontology, and other fields of biology.

Shrub Roses

McKeon , Judith C. Gardening with Roses : Designing with Easy - Care Climbers , Ramblers , and Shrubs . New York : Friedman / Fairfax Publishing ... 100 Flowers and How They Got Their Names . Chapel Hill , NC : Algonquin Books of Chapel ...

Shrub Roses

"Shrub Roses"-- Marilyn Raff introduces low maintenance roses for any garden situation, any lifestyle, and any climate to both the novice and expert gardener.

Rhododendron

54; Diana Wells, 100 Flowers and How They Got Their Names (Chapel Hill, NC, 1997), p. 200. Street, Hardy Rhododendrons, p. 52. Judith Taylor, Visions of Loveliness: Great Flower Breeders of the Past (Athens, OH, 2014), p. 130.

Rhododendron

Has ever a plant inspired such love and such hatred as the rhododendron? Its beauty is inarguable; it can clothe whole hillsides and gardens with a blanket of vibrant color. The rhododendron has a propensity towards sexual infidelity, making it very popular with horticultural breeding programs. And it can also be used as an herbal remedy for an astonishing range of ailments. But there is a darker side to these gorgeous flowers. Daphne du Maurier used the red rhododendron as a symbol of blood in her best-selling novel Rebecca, and numerous Chinese folktales link the plant with tragedy and death. It can poison livestock and intoxicate humans, and its narcotic honey has been used as a weapon of war. Rhododendron ponticum has run riot across the British countryside, but the full story of this implacable invader contains many fascinating surprises. In this beautifully illustrated volume, Richard Milne explores the many ways in which the rhododendron has influenced human societies, relating this to the extraordinary story of the plant’s evolution. Over one thousand species of the plant exist, ranging from rugged trees on Himalayan slopes to rock-hugging alpines, and delicate plants perched on rainforest branches. Milne relays tales of mythical figures, intrepid collectors, and eccentric plant breeders. However much you may think you know about the rhododendron, this charming book will offer something new.

Wildflowers of the Boundary Waters

The Language of Flowers . ... Gray's New Manual of Botany : A Handbook of the Flowering Plants and Ferns of the Central and Northeastern United States and Adjacent Canada . ... 100 Flowers and How They Got Their Names .

Wildflowers of the Boundary Waters

Arranged by season and including helpful "as seen while hiking" views, this guidebook opens up a world of natural beauty for wildflower watchers in northen climes.

A History of Gardening in 50 Objects

... 1978) Isley, Duane, One Hundred and One Botanists (Iowa State University, 1994) Jellicoe, Geoffrey, Susan Jellicoe, ... David, Georgian Gardens (Robert Hale, 1979) Wells, Diana, 100 Flowers and How They Got Their Names (Algonquin, ...

A History of Gardening in 50 Objects

The earliest record of an enclosed space around a homestead come from 10,000 BC and since then gardens of varying types and ambition have been popular throughout the ages. Whether ornamental patches surrounding wild cottages, container gardens blooming over unforgiving concrete or those turned over for growing produce, gardens exist in all shapes and sizes, in all manner of styles. Today we benefit from centuries of development, be it in the cultivation of desirable blossom or larger fruits, in the technology to keep weeds and lawn at bay or even in the visionaries who tore up rulebooks and cultivated pure creativity in their green spaces. George Drower takes fifty objects that have helped create the gardening scene we know today and explores the history outside spaces in a truly unique fashion. With stunning botanical and archive images, this lavish volume is essential for garden lovers.

The Herb in History Mysteries and Crafts

“Natural products derived from plants as a source of drugs.” Journal of Advanced Pharmaceutical Technology and Research. 2012 Oct-Dec. Wells, Diana. 100 Flowers and How They Got Their Names. Algonquin Books: Chapel Hill, North Carolina, ...

The Herb in History  Mysteries and Crafts

This book is not the usual herbal; not a homeopathic handbook, a cookbook or a gardener’s consort; not even a compendium of history or lore, though these are its favourite pursuits. At heart, it is a tale of humanity’s poignant relationship with nature. Told in short vignettes, profusely illustrated and sprinkled with personal asides, it touches broadly on the role of plants in legend, in religion, in medicine, commerce, crafts and tradition, in literature, language, politics, beauty, in the rise and fall of empires, in food and manners, in love, in murder, and in crushing social passions. It selects from the trove of history and science moments that amaze, or shock, or move us to disbelief, and asks us to explore the uncanny bond between us and our non-speaking partners in creation.

Naturally Curious

100 Flowers and How They Got Their Names. Chapel Hill, NC: Algonquin Books of Chapel Hill, 1997. Wells, Kentwood. The Ecology and Behavior of Amphibians. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2007. Wessels, Tom.

Naturally Curious

2011 National Outdoor Book Award for Nature Guidebook Are you ready for a black fly bite to get graphic, for a barred owl's call to take on new meaning, and for the life cycle of the eastern newt to suddenly seem complex, beautiful, and intricately bound to the subtle patterns of mysterious underwater landscapes and damp forest floors? Naturalist Mary Holland's new book Naturally Curious promises a walk in the woods will never be the same. Holland leads you through the New England seasons out-of-doors—through the sun, rain, and snow; along roadsides and wetlands; above underground burrows and under treetop nesting sites. With just a turn of the page you'll suddenly know more about the creatures that frequent your backyard or the pond you visit every summer than you ever thought possible. Naturally Curious perfectly melds practical field guide with informal nature literature, providing you the remarkable opportunity to sit back, relax, and learn something fascinating about the natural world around you.