1913

Dublin 1913 - Lockout Low-paid workers - under the leadership of Big Jim Larkin - organised themselves into Unions to insist on better conditions.

1913

Dublin 1913 - a city of haves and have-nots. The business-owners lived comfortably, with servants and fine homes. They barely knew of the lives of the poor workers, crowded into ramshackle tenement buildings where disease and hunger were rife. These two worlds collided when Big Jim' Larkin took on the might of the business world. Opposing him was wealthy businessman William Martin Murphy, who refused to employ Larkin's Union members and organized a Lockout to break the spirit of the striking workers. A dramatically illustrated account of a dark time in Irish history. Illustrated by Alan Nolan.

The Dublin Lockout 1913

In this pioneering collection, an exemplary list of contributors registers the radical momentum within Dublin in 1913, its effects internationally, and its paramount example in shaping political activism within Ireland to this day.

The Dublin Lockout  1913

Putting Ireland on trial, Jim Larkin’s verdict was damning and resolute. His words resound, shuddering towards the present day where class division and workers’ rights disputes make headlines with swelling frequency. In this pioneering collection, an exemplary list of contributors registers the radical momentum within Dublin in 1913, its effects internationally, and its paramount example in shaping political activism within Ireland to this day. The narrative of the beleaguered yet dignified workers who stood up to the greed of their Irish masters is examined, revealing the truths that were too fraught with trauma, shame and political tension to remain within popular memory. Beyond the animosity and immediate impact of the industrial dispute are its enduring lessons through the First World War, the Easter Rising, and the birth of the Irish Free State; its legacy, real and adopted, instructs the surge of activism currently witnessed, but to what effect? The Dublin Lockout, 1913 illuminates this pivotal class war in Irish history: inspiring, shocking, and the nearest thing Ireland had to a debate on the type of society that was wanted by its citizens.

Cultures of War in Graphic Novels

... followed by the Anglo-Irish War of 1919–1921 in At War with the Empire (published in 2012), continued in the Dublin Lockout of 1913 in Larkin's Labour War (published in 2013), and finished with the prison protests of 1980–1981 in ...

Cultures of War in Graphic Novels

Cultures of War in Graphic Novels examines the representation of small-scale and often less acknowledged conflicts from around the world and throughout history. The contributors look at an array of graphic novels about conflicts such as the Boxer Rebellion (1899-1901), the Irish struggle for national independence (1916-1998), the Falkland War (1982), the Bosnian War (1992-1995), the Rwandan genocide (1994), the Israel-Lebanon War (2006), and the War on Terror (2001-). The book explores the multi-layered relation between the graphic novel as a popular medium and war as a pivotal recurring experience in human history. The focus on largely overlooked small-scale conflicts contributes not only to advance our understanding of graphic novels about war and the cultural aspects of war as reflected in graphic novels, but also our sense of the early twenty-first century, in which popular media and limited conflicts have become closely interrelated.

The Labour Hercules The Irish Citizen Army and Irish Republicanism 1913 23

Wayne Thorpe, 'The European Syndicalists and War, 1914–1918' in Contemporary European History, 1 (2001), p. 1. Ibid. pp. ... Bill Moran, '1913, Jim Larkin and the British Labour Movement' in Saothar, 1 (1978), p.

The    Labour Hercules     The Irish Citizen Army and Irish Republicanism  1913   23

The Irish Citizen Army (ICA) was born from the Dublin Lockout of 1913, when industrialist William Martin Murphy ‘locked out’ workers who refused to resign from the Irish Transport and General Workers’ Union, sparking one of the most dramatic industrial disputes in Irish history. Faced with threats of police brutality in response to the strike, James Connolly, James Larkin and Jack White established the ICA in the winter of 1913. By the end of March 1914, the ICA espoused republican ideology and that the ownership of Ireland was ‘vested of right in the people of Ireland’. The ICA was in the process of being totally transformed, going on to provide significant support to the IRA during the 1916 Rising. Despite Connolly’s execution and the internment of many ICA members, the ICA reorganised in 1917, subsequently developing networks for arms importation and ‘intelligence’, and later providing operative support for the War of Independence in Dublin. The most extensive survey of the movement to date, The ‘Labour Hercules’ explores the ICA’s evolution into a republican army and its legacy to the present day.

On Trauma and Traumatic Memory

1913: Larkin's Labour War. Dublin: O'Brien, 2013. Print. —. At War with the Empire: Ireland's Fight For Independence. Dublin: O'Brien, 2015. Print. —. Bobby Sand: Freedom Fighter. Dublin: O'Brien, 2016. Print.

On Trauma and Traumatic Memory

On Trauma and Traumatic Memory focuses on the role of writing to preserve memories, to excavate traumas and to heal the ever-present scars of the past. The first part of the book focuses on trauma recalled through films, fiction and documentaries. The second chapter is devoted to analysing trauma in fiction, while the third deals with trauma in poetry. The topic of trauma is of interest to scholars across the globe, both students and professors, and is taught in almost all universities. This volume gathers research papers from different universities around the world, including India, Italy, Tunisia and the USA.

James Larkin Lion of the Fold

the First World War, and which seemed to permeate every class, would neither be stemmed nor redeemed by any act of ... The epic struggle of the Dublin workers against their employers in 1913 made Larkin an international figure in the ...

James Larkin  Lion of the Fold

This book is a detailed compilation of writings and lectures about the life of James Larkin. It reviews his influence in history and on various movements across the country and abroad. James Larkin: Lion of the Fold includes writing by James Larkin and is a timely reminder of the long road that the Irish people have travelled together. The book considers much of the history of the early Irish Labour Movement and includes a vast range of opinion on James Larkin.

Lockout Dublin 1913

But it won the war: 1913 meant that there was no going back to the horrors of pre-Larkin Dublin. This outstanding survey shows why: it has already established itself as the definitive work on the Lockout.

Lockout Dublin 1913

On 26 August 1913 the trams stopped running in Dublin. Striking conductors and drivers, members of the Irish Transport Workers’ Union, abandoned their vehicles. They had refused a demand from their employer, William Martin Murphy of the Dublin United Transport Company, to forswear union membership or face dismissal. The company then locked them out. Within a month, the charismatic union leader, James Larkin, had called out over 20,000 workers across the city in sympathetic action. By January 1914 the union had lost the battle, lacking the resources for a long campaign. But it won the war: 1913 meant that there was no going back to the horrors of pre-Larkin Dublin. This outstanding survey shows why: it has already established itself as the definitive work on the Lockout.

An Atlas of Irish History

In 1908 Larkin founded the Irish Transport and General Workers ' Union ( ITGWU ) , the most influential Irish union ... where he introduced militant European - style syndicalism , which culminated in the labour disputes of 1913–14 .

An Atlas of Irish History

Fully revised and updated with over 100 beautiful maps, charts and graphs, and a narrative packed with facts this outstanding book examines the main changes that have occurred in Ireland and among the Irish abroad over the past two millennia.

A New History of Ireland Volume VI

This , however , dwindled almost to nothing by the new year , after Larkin had alienated the T.U.C. by the violence and ... testified to the extent of his defeat , the great Dublin labour war of 1913 left behind it three legacies .

A New History of Ireland  Volume VI

A New History of Ireland is the largest scholarly project in modern Irish history. In 9 volumes, it provides a comprehensive new synthesis of modern scholarship on every aspect of Irish history and prehistory, from the earliest geological and archaeological evidence, through the Middle Ages, down to the present day. Volume VI opens with a character study of the period, followed by ten chapters of narrative history, and a study of Ireland in 1914. It includes further chapters on the economy, literature, the Irish language, music, arts, education, administration and the public service, and emigration.

A New History of Ireland

This, however, dwindled almost to nothing by the new year, after Larkin had alienated the T.U.C. by the violence and crudity ... testified to the extent of his defeat, the great Dublin labour war of 1913 left behind it three legacies.

A New History of Ireland

A New History of Ireland is the largest scholarly project in modern Irish history. In 9 volumes, it provides a comprehensive new synthesis of modern scholarship on every aspect of Irish history and prehistory, from the earliest geological and archaeological evidence, through the Middle Ages, down to the present day. Volume VI opens with a character study of the period, followed by ten chapters of narrative history, and a study of Ireland in 1914. It includes further chapters on the economy, literature, the Irish language, music, arts, education, administration and the public service, and emigration.

A New History of Ireland Ireland under the Union II 1870 1921

This, however, dwindled almost to nothing by the new year, after Larkin had alienated the T.U.C. by the violence and crudity ... testified to the extent of his defeat, the great Dublin labour war of 1913 left behind it three legacies.

A New History of Ireland  Ireland under the Union  II  1870 1921


Dear Dirty Dublin

Labour Gazette, March 1909; Irish Times, December 5, 14, 16, 22, 23, 1908 and February 17, 1909. ... 1913— Jim Larkin ami the Dublin Lock-Out published by the Workers' Union of Ireland (Dublin, 1964), which also contains an intetesting ...

Dear  Dirty Dublin


The Enigma of Arthur Griffith

However, the workers did not win in 1913. Larkin left Dublin in 1914 and only returned when the Irish Free State had been founded and the civil war was over. He is said to have resented Connolly's status as a national martyr after ...

The Enigma of Arthur Griffith

Almost a century after his untimely death in 1922, this lively and insightful new assessment explores the man Michael Collins described as ‘father of us all’ and reclaims Arthur Griffith as the founder of both Sinn Féin and the Irish Free State.

Irishmen Or English Soldiers

Although William Martin Murphy , in You appeal to their manhood , their love for responding to the rise in labour ... local press as Jim Larkin's brother , visited worth working for , if the workers will only Waterford in September 1913 ...

Irishmen Or English Soldiers

Unskilled urban workers made up the bulk of Irish volunteers who fought in the British army during the First World War, and Sir Roger Casement described them as being "not Irishmen but English soldiers". In this book, the case of an illiterate general laborer, born in 1876 in Waterford city, who enlisted in the 16th (Irish) Division is used to study the motivation of Catholics enlisting in the British army and to assess the credibility of Casement’s judgment which, the book argues, is too simplistic. The decision to enlist resulted from a complex range of external social, economic and political pressures to which men were subjected during the course of their lifetimes. These are examined in detail and arguments are supported with graphs, charts, tables and numerical calculations. The case of the men enlisting in the British army is considered from three perspectives: via a study of Waterford’s community as representative of the social, economic and political relationships of southern Ireland as a whole; through the presentation of ground-breaking evidence and analysis of more immediate reasons for enlistment; through an examination of why, having enlisted, Irishmen remained loyal to the British army and the 16th (Irish) Division in particular.

Ireland the Great War and the Geography of Remembrance

The response of the Employers' Federation on 22 September was to lock out all members of the Transport Workers' Union. Around 25,000 men were out of work.22 This heightening of tension resulted in a call by Jim Larkin, in November 1913, ...

Ireland  the Great War and the Geography of Remembrance

Nuala C. Johnson explores the complex relationship between social memory and space in the representation of war in Ireland. The Irish experience of the Great War, and its commemoration, is the location of Dr Johnson's sustained and pioneering examination of the development of memorial landscapes, and her study represents a major contribution both to cultural geography and to the historiography of remembrance. Attractively illustrated, this book combines theoretical perspectives with original primary research showing how memory literally took place in post-1918 Ireland, and the various conflicts and struggles that were both a cause and effect of this process. Of interest to scholars in a number of disciplines, Ireland, The Great War and The Geography of Remembrance shows powerfully how Irish efforts to collectively remember the Great War were constantly in dialogue with issues surrounding the national question, and the memorials themselves bore witness to these tensions and ambiguities.

Dictionary of Labour Biography

Dobbie shared Larkin's platform. Yet in 1913, Dobbie as President of the GRWU, had been involved heavily in the negotiations for an amalgamation of the railway unions. In one sense this initiative could be seen as a response to the ...

Dictionary of Labour Biography

The Dictionary of Labour Biography has an outstanding reputation as a reference work for the study of nineteenth and twentieth century British history. Volume XV maintains this standard of original and thorough scholarship. Each entry is written by a specialist drawing on an array of primary and secondary sources. The biographical essays engage with recent historiographical developments in the field of labour history. The scope of the volume emphasises the ethnic and national diversity of the British labour movement and neglected political traditions.

Labour British radicalism and the First World War

Instead of set piece battles preceded by long negotiations, Larkin would call workers out at short notice, ... This was the industrial dispute as social warfare. ... It reached a cataclysmic culmination with the famous 1913 lockout.

Labour  British radicalism and the First World War

This book provides a concise set of thirteen essays looking at various aspects of the British left, movements of protest and the cumulative impact of the First World War. There are three broad areas this work intends to make a contribution to; the first is to help us further understand the role the Labour Party played in the conflict, and its evolving attitudes towards the war; the second strand concerns the notion of work, and particularly women’s work; the third strand deals with the impact of theory and practice of forces located largely outside the United Kingdom. Through these essays this book aims to provide a series of thirteen bite-size analyses of key issues affecting the British left throughout the war, and to further our understanding of it in this critical period of commemoration.

The Life of George Ranken Askwith 1861 1942

Samuel Gompers (1850–1924) founded the American Federation of Labor, and was its president in 1886–1924. ... Freeman's Journal, 4 October 1913; cited in E. Larkin, James Larkin: Irish Labour Leader (London: Routledge & Kegan Paul, ...

The Life of George Ranken Askwith  1861   1942

George Ranken Askwith was a key figure in the development of British industrial relations. This new biography is based on a wide range of archival sources including government records, newspaper articles, Askwith’s personal correspondence and his wife’s private diaries.

Historical Dictionary of Ireland

With his associates James Connolly and William O'Brien (1881–1968), Larkin founded the Irish Labour Party in 1912, to serve as a political wing of ... By 1913, the ITGWU had become the largest and most aggressive labor union in Ireland.

Historical Dictionary of Ireland

This new edition of Historical Dictionary of Ireland is an excellent resource for discovering the history of Ireland. This is done through a chronology, an introductory essay, and an extensive bibliography. The cross-referenced dictionary section has over 600 entries on significant persons, places and events, political parties and institutions (including the Catholic church) with period forays into literature, music and the arts. This book is an excellent resource for students, researchers, and anyone wanting to know more about Ireland.

The Politics of Labor in a Global Age

As a first step in that process, Larkin declared the unacceptability of continuing 'the policy of grafting ourselves on the English Trade Union Movement'.342 After an unsuccessful eight-month strike in Dublin during 1913–14, Larkin left ...

The Politics of Labor in a Global Age

The Politics of Labor in a Global Age is one of the first works to analyse and compare recent shifts in patterns of industrial relations across late-industrializing and post-socialist economies. The volume features original and timely essays on labor relations at national, local, and workplace levels, as economic and politicla actors cope with the similar challenges associated with economic adjustment measures and the impact of 'globalization'. The authors reveal that while globalizationhas threatened the position of organized labor and prompted business and state elites to accommodate greater labor market flexibility, the legacies of past institutions remain evident in destinctive trends in labor politics within and across late-industrializing and post-socialist settings. The comparisons suggest that globalization is best understood not as a source of covergence but as a set of common pressures that are mediated by specific historical inheritances, that spur varied responseson the part of industrial relations actors, and that facilitate quite diverse institutional outcomes.