The 1910s Scrapbook

History.

The 1910s Scrapbook

Retrospectively, we see the time of the 1910s being invaded with the images of the First World War, and yet in the early years of that decade people were focussed on events at home, whether King George V's coronation or the women involved in the suffrage

The 1920s Scrapbook

House and garden - Domestic appliances - Food, groceries - Sweets - Household products - Cosmetics, toiletries - Magazines - Women's fashion - Men's and children's fashion - Comics - Toys, games, annuals - Cycling and hiking - Resorts and ...

The 1920s Scrapbook

House and garden - Domestic appliances - Food, groceries - Sweets - Household products - Cosmetics, toiletries - Magazines - Women's fashion - Men's and children's fashion - Comics - Toys, games, annuals - Cycling and hiking - Resorts and railways - Holidays abroad - Cruising - Flying - Film stars - Radio - Entertainment, TV - Cigarettes - Telegrams to telephone - Fireworks - Christmas crackers - Jubilee and Edward VIII - Coronation George VI.

The Scrapbook in American Life

In the 1920s scrapbook of memorabilia kept by Juanita Page Johnson of her years at a Chicago high school , a brightly dressed African American flapper dances between other pages where more staidly dressed Caucasian women predominate .

The Scrapbook in American Life

This book explores the history of scrapbook-making, its origins, uses, changing forms and purposes as well as the human agents behind the books themselves. Scrapbooks bring pleasure in both the making and consuming - and are one of the most enduring yet simultaneously changing cultural forms of the last two centuries. Despite the popularity of scrapbooks, no one has placed them within historical traditions until now. This volume considers the makers, their artefacts, And The viewers within the context of American culture. The volume's contributors do not show the reader how to make scrapbooks or improve techniques but instead explore the curious history of what others have done in the past and why these splendid examples of material and visual culture have such a significant place in many households.

The Confident Years

The Confident Years


The Weight of Their Votes

Southern Women and Political Leverage in the 1920s Lorraine Gates Schuyler ... Undated clipping: “Hundreds of Women Vote in Macon Primary Election,” Scrapbook, p. ... Clipping: “Comment,” 7 November 1920, SCLWV Scrapbook, 1:69, SCL. 72.

The Weight of Their Votes

After the ratification of the Nineteenth Amendment in 1920, hundreds of thousands of southern women went to the polls for the first time. In The Weight of Their Votes Lorraine Gates Schuyler examines the consequences this had in states across the South. She shows that from polling places to the halls of state legislatures, women altered the political landscape in ways both symbolic and substantive. Schuyler challenges popular scholarly opinion that women failed to wield their ballots effectively in the 1920s, arguing instead that in state and local politics, women made the most of their votes. Schuyler explores get-out-the-vote campaigns staged by black and white women in the region and the response of white politicians to the sudden expansion of the electorate. Despite the cultural expectations of southern womanhood and the obstacles of poll taxes, literacy tests, and other suffrage restrictions, southern women took advantage of their voting power, Schuyler shows. Black women mobilized to challenge disfranchisement and seize their right to vote. White women lobbied state legislators for policy changes and threatened their representatives with political defeat if they failed to heed women's policy demands. Thus, even as southern Democrats remained in power, the social welfare policies and public spending priorities of southern states changed in the 1920s as a consequence of woman suffrage.

Extreme Collecting

The Wartime Scrapbook. London: New Cavendish Books. The 1930s Scrapbook. London: New Cavendish. Colgate-Palmolive in the UK: 75 Years of Care. ... The 1920s Scrapbook. London: New Cavendish Books. The 1970s Scrapbook.

Extreme Collecting

By exploring the processes of collecting, which challenge the bounds of normally acceptable practice, this book debates the practice of collecting 'difficult' objects, from a historical and contemporary perspective; and discusses the acquisition of objects related to war and genocide, and those purchased from the internet, as well as considering human remains, mass produced objects and illicitly traded antiquities. The aim is to apply a critical approach to the rigidity of museums in maintaining essentially nineteenth-century ideas of collecting; and to move towards identifying priorities for collection policies in museums, which are inclusive of acquiring 'difficult' objects. Much of the book engages with the question of the limits to the practice of collecting as a means to think through the implementation of new strategies.

Go West Young Women

“In and Out of Focus: Miriam Cooper,” July 25, 1920, Parsons Scrapbook no. 4, MHL. When discussing why actresses married younger, Parsons noted that “actresses, particularly the successful ones, are extraordinarily independent.

Go West  Young Women

In the early part of the twentieth century, migrants made their way from rural homes to cities in record numbers and many traveled west. Los Angeles became a destination. Women flocked to the growing town to join the film industry as workers and spectators, creating a “New Woman.” Their efforts transformed filmmaking from a marginal business to a cosmopolitan, glamorous, and bohemian one. By 1920, Los Angeles had become the only western city where women outnumbered men. In Go West, Young Women, Hilary A. Hallett explores these relatively unknown new western women and their role in the development of Los Angeles and the nascent film industry. From Mary Pickford’s rise to become perhaps the most powerful woman of her age, to the racist moral panics of the post–World War I years that culminated in Hollywood’s first sex scandal, Hallett describes how the path through early Hollywood presaged the struggles over modern gender roles that animated the century to come.

Australia s Asian Sporting Context 1920s 30s

George Mendies Scrapbook, 3. Box-0n, 28 October 1921. Manila Daily Bulletin, 3 December 1921 in George Mendies Scrapbooks. George Mendies Scrapbooks, [Most clippings are from the Manila Times]. Referee, 8 February 1922.

Australia s Asian Sporting Context  1920s     30s

This book examines Australia’s sporting relationships with the Asian region during the interwar period. Until now, Australia’s sporting relationships with the Asian region have been neglected by scholars of Australian and Asian sports history, and the broader field of Australia’s Asian context. Concentrating on the period of the 1920s and 1930s – when sporting relationships between Australia and a number of Asian nations emerged in a variety of sports – this book demonstrates the depth of these previously under-examined connections. The book challenges, and complicates, the broader historiography of Australia’s Asian context – a historiography that has been strongly influenced by the White Australia Policy and the Pacific War. Why, for example, did white Australia so warmly welcome visiting Japanese sportsmen at a time when the Pacific region appeared to be inexorably sliding into a war that was informed by racial antagonisms? This book examines sporting relations between Australia and seven Asian countries (China, Japan, India, Netherlands East Indies, Philippines, Malaya and Singapore) and a range of sports including rugby, football, swimming, hockey, boxing, cricket and tennis. This book was published as a special issue of Sport in Society.

Michigan Memories

ORABILIA CITATIONS rabilia are excerpted from scrapbooks donated to the Bentley Historical y . Identification of scrapbook author and inclusive dates are listed . sh Backus papers , 1860-1920 , pp . 4 , 29 , 30 de Celeste Benson ...

Michigan Memories


American Cinema of the 1920s

1927. Greta Garbo scrapbook, LMPA. “Van Wert Clothing Company.” Advertisement. Coshocton Tribune 4 Oct. 1920: 12. NA, accessed 12 Mar. 2006. Van Wyck, Carolyn. “Favorite Recipes of the Stars.” Photoplay Oct. 1927: 101. Vance, Jeffrey.

American Cinema of the 1920s

During the 1920s, sound revolutionized the motion picture industry and cinema continued as one of the most significant and popular forms of mass entertainment in the world. Film studios were transformed into major corporations, hiring a host of craftsmen and technicians including cinematographers, editors, screenwriters, and set designers. The birth of the star system supported the meteoric rise and celebrity status of actors including Charlie Chaplin, Mary Pickford, Joan Crawford, Greta Garbo, and Rudolph Valentino while black performers (relegated to "race films") appeared infrequently in mainstream movies. The classic Hollywood film style was perfected and significant film genres were established: the melodrama, western, historical epic, and romantic comedy, along with slapstick, science fiction, and fantasy. In ten original essays, American Cinema of the 1920s examines the film industry's continued growth and prosperity while focusing on important themes of the era.

Blackball the Black Sox and the Babe

Peace Proposal with Strings , " The Sporting News , January 8 , 1920 , p . 4 . 10. Henry P. Edwards , “ National League Is Reported to Be Solid for Chicago Man , ” The Cleveland Plain Dealer , January 10 , 1920 , Landis Scrapbook ...

Blackball  the Black Sox  and the Babe

Nineteen-twenty was a crucial year not just for the Chicago White Sox but for the game of baseball, in the aftermath of the 1919 World Series scandal. This work is both a collective biography of four individuals whose careers in baseball were forever altered in 1920 and an examination of the 1920 baseball season as a whole. It highlights four legendary personalities--Judge Kenesaw Mountain Landis, the longtime commissioner of Major League Baseball; Babe Ruth, the great pitcher and slugger who changed the game forever; Buck Weaver, the true lone innocent among the Black Sox players who threw the 1919 World Series; and Rube Foster, the fine pitcher, imaginative manager, and great administrator of blackball who founded the Negro National League. Key events that affected the season and the history of baseball are discussed. Nineteen-twenty was the year that Ruth shattered his own home run record and began a hitting spree that brought in record numbers of fans to the ballparks. It was the year that Rube found a way for large numbers of African-Americans to play the game meaningfully, before loyal crowds, despite Jim Crow laws that kept them out of the majors and minors. Instructors considering this book for use in a course may request an examination copy here.

Jazz and Justice

Clippings, 1926–27, Chicago Crime Scrapbooks, Chicago History Museum. See also Frank R. Hayde, Jazz Heavyweight, ... Scrapbook, 1920s, Louis Armstrong Archive, Queens College, New York. Laurence Bergreen, Louis Armstrong: An Extravagant ...

Jazz and Justice

A galvanizing history of how jazz and jazz musicians flourished despite rampant cultural exploitation The music we call “jazz” arose in late nineteenth century North America—most likely in New Orleans—based on the musical traditions of Africans, newly freed from slavery. Grounded in the music known as the “blues,” which expressed the pain, sufferings, and hopes of Black folk then pulverized by Jim Crow, this new music entered the world via the instruments that had been abandoned by departing military bands after the Civil War. Jazz and Justice examines the economic, social, and political forces that shaped this music into a phenomenal US—and Black American—contribution to global arts and culture. Horne assembles a galvanic story depicting what may have been the era’s most virulent economic—and racist—exploitation, as jazz musicians battled organized crime, the Ku Klux Klan, and other variously malignant forces dominating the nightclub scene where jazz became known. Horne pays particular attention to women artists, such as pianist Mary Lou Williams and trombonist Melba Liston, and limns the contributions of musicians with Native American roots. This is the story of a beautiful lotus, growing from the filth of the crassest form of human immiseration.

Calendar of the Speeches and Other Published Statements of Franklin D Roosevelt 1910 1920

Syracuse ( N.Y. ) Herald , July 4 , 1920 ( clipping in Scrapbook 14 , p . 15 , Group 9 ) . 795. Telegram of congratulations to Governor James M. Cox , from San Francisco , Calif . , July 6 , 1920 . Congratulates the Democratic nominee ...

Calendar of the Speeches and Other Published Statements of Franklin D  Roosevelt  1910 1920


Ernest Gruening and the American Dissenting Tradition

1199– 1200 ( March 8 , 1922 ) ; Herbert Seligman , “ The Conquest of Haiti , ” The Nation , July 10 , 1920 . 3. Boston Chronicle , Jan. ... Haitian press clippings , 1920s scrapbook , GP ; Schmidt , The U.S. Occupation of Haiti , pp .

Ernest Gruening and the American Dissenting Tradition

Gruening is perhaps best known for his vehement fight against U.S. military involvement in Vietnam. However, as Johnson shows here, it's Gruening's sixty-year public career in its entirety that provides an opportunity for historians to explore continuity and change in dissenting thought in twentieth-century America.

Penelope s Web

Collage 7 : Images of H.D. – The 1920s : 1. H.D. , c . 1919-20 . 2. H.D. , c . late 1920s ( ? ) . 3. H.D. , by Man Ray , 1922 ; another photo from this series was in H.D.'s Scrapbook . 4 . H.D. , Film cut from Wing Beat , 1927 , also ...

Penelope s Web

Penelope's Web, published in 1991, was the first book to examine fully the brilliantly innovative prose writing of Hilda Doolittle. H. D.'s reputation as a major modernist poet has grown dramatically; but she also deserves to be known for her innovative novels and essays.

Making Vintage 1920s Clothes for Women

Page from a scrapbook showing fashions from 1920 including day dresses, a mackintosh, a wool coat, a tailored suit and three cocktail dresses for evening wear. (Worthing Museum and Art Gallery) Page from a scrapbook showing fashions ...

Making Vintage 1920s Clothes for Women

The 'roaring twenties' were exciting years for women's fashion. The iconic image is of the young 'flapper' dancing the night away in a sparkling dress with fringes and tassels moving to the beat of the Jazz age. But, for all women in the post-war years of the 1920s, there was a new freedom in fashion as hemlines lifted and waistlines dropped. The simplified silhouette caused a boom in home dressmaking as women with basic sewing skills used tissue paper patterns to run up a new frock in the latest style. This practical book explains the background to these years and the trends in women's fashion, before introducing a range of garments that women would typically have worn. Suzanne Rowland gives a unique and detailed account of how to make vintage 1920s clothes for women based on the dress collections at the Royal Pavilion & Museums, Brighton & Hove, and Worthing Museum and Art Gallery. Fifteen detailed projects for garments and accessories include a pair of fashionably daring beach pyjamas, the wedding dress of a bride from East Sussex, and a simple striped frock suitable for wearing at a British seaside resort. Each project includes a detailed description of the original garment with an accompanying illustration alongside photographs of the original pieces. Scaled patterns are included with a list of materials and equipment required. Step-by-step instructions and close-up photographs are given for each stage of the making process with information about the original techniques used. Superbly illustrated with 314 close-up colour photographs.

Deportes

“Los Zapateros se Ponen las Botas,” ca. late 1920s, Scrapbook, Orozco Family Archive. 58. ... Another White Sox Ball Park, home of the Los Angeles White Sox, a black semipro team, existed in Boyle Heights in 1920.

Deportes

Spanning the first half of the twentieth century, Deportes uncovers the hidden experiences of Mexican male and female athletes, teams and leagues and their supporters who fought for a more level playing field on both sides of the border. Despite a widespread belief that Mexicans shunned physical exercise, teamwork or “good sportsmanship,” they proved that they could compete in a wide variety of sports at amateur, semiprofessional, Olympic and professional levels. Some even made their mark in the sports world by becoming the “first” Mexican athlete to reach the big leagues and win Olympic medals or world boxing and tennis titles. These sporting achievements were not theirs alone, an entire cadre of supporters—families, friends, coaches, managers, promoters, sportswriters, and fans—rallied around them and celebrated their athletic success. The Mexican nation and community, at home or abroad, elevated Mexican athletes to sports hero status with a deep sense of cultural and national pride. Alamillo argues that Mexican-origin males and females in the United States used sports to empower themselves and their community by developing and sustaining transnational networks with Mexico. Ultimately, these athletes and their supporters created a “sporting Mexican diaspora” that overcame economic barriers, challenged racial and gender assumptions, forged sporting networks across borders, developed new hybrid identities and raised awareness about civil rights within and beyond the sporting world.

Writing with Scissors

American Scrapbooks from the Civil War to the Harlem Renaissance Ellen Gruber Garvey ... in relation to clipping practices in visual arts, in “News, Paper, Scissors: Clippings in the Sciences and Arts Around 1920,” in Things That ...

Writing with Scissors

Men and women 150 years ago grappled with information overload by making scrapbooks-the ancestors of Google and blogging. From Abraham Lincoln to Susan B. Anthony, African American janitors to farmwomen, abolitionists to Confederates, people cut out and pasted down their reading. Writing with Scissors opens a new window into the feelings and thoughts of ordinary and extraordinary Americans. Like us, nineteenth-century readers spoke back to the media, and treasured what mattered to them. In this groundbreaking book, Ellen Gruber Garvey reveals a previously unexplored layer of American popular culture, where the proliferating cheap press touched the lives of activists and mourning parents, and all who yearned for a place in history. Scrapbook makers documented their feelings about momentous public events such as living through the Civil War, mediated through the newspapers. African Americans and women's rights activists collected, concentrated, and critiqued accounts from a press that they did not control to create "unwritten histories" in books they wrote with scissors. Whether scrapbook makers pasted their clippings into blank books, sermon collections, or the pre-gummed scrapbook that Mark Twain invented, they claimed ownership of their reading. They created their own democratic archives. Writing with Scissors argues that people have long had a strong personal relationship to media. Like newspaper editors who enthusiastically "scissorized" and reprinted attractive items from other newspapers, scrapbook makers passed their reading along to family and community. This book explains how their scrapbooks underlie our present-day ways of thinking about information, news, and what we do with it.