A Child's War

Growing Up on the Home Front

A Child's War

When the Second World War broke out in September 1939, it came as no surprise to the children of Germany: the Nazis had been preparing them for a war ever since they had come to power in 1933. To British children it was an altogether different matter. Children all over Britain were deeply affected by the war: many were separated from their parents by evacuation or bereavement; all had to 'make do and mend' with clothes and toys; and some even died while contributing to the war effort at home. In this moving and often amusing account, Mike Brown describes what life was like on the Home Front during the war from a child's point of view. His fully illustrated narrative includes details of evacuation, rationing, coping with gas masks and air raids, entertainment and the important - and often dangerous - roles of the Boy Scouts and Girl Guides. This photographic history pays tribute to the generation of girls and boys who grew up under the shadow of the Second World War.

A Child's War

A Child's War

A Child's War tells the story of Germany's occupation of Guernsey through the eyes of a young girl.

A Child's War

A Child's War

Like thousands of other children in London this eight year old boy with his younger brother, were evacuated to the country on the orders of the British Government. Two days before the outbreak of World War II, on September 1st, 1939, they left for the duration of the war, separated from their parents and families until the war ended in 1945, apart from rare visits for a few days during this period. The author recalls many of his memories and boyhood experiences – some horrifying, some sad, all indelible. Memories to remain with him like tens of thousands of other youngsters who went through this traumatic time in World War II.

A Child's War

World War II Through the Eyes of Children

A Child's War

Fifteen people, who were children during World War II, share their memories of the period and explain how it shaped their lives

A Child's War

A Child's War

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Omar El Akkad's "American War". A Child's Perspective on War

Omar El Akkad's

Scientific Essay from the year 2018 in the subject English - Literature, Works, Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz, language: English, abstract: The incorporation of war into English speaking literature has a long tradition since wars as such form ideal literacy backgrounds for plot, character development or political criticism. In times of civil uproar, political insecurity, outer enemies or ongoing wars this use of war as a literary means has always increased. This is recently perhaps best shown by the events of 9/11. They have not only taken American literature out from its long involvement in local matters such as family, village or town but pushed it into new directions which formed completely new types of novels such as the 9/11 novel, the post-9/11 novel or Ground Zero Fiction where war gained a new dimension which was so different from war literature of the First World War, the Second World War or the Vietnam War. In most cases this literary coverage of 9/11 has mostly remained in American families or matters of 'home' and it lacked an appropriate coverage of the Muslim side and it is here where the novel analyzed here steps in. Omar EI Akkad's novel American War (2017) exactly fits in this background not only because it is written by an author originating from a Muslim background it also brings the topic war back to America to discuss it here. This is new and radical in the sense that readers suddenly are confronted with problems such as war, terrorism, suicide bombers or chemical warfare which so far have been placed on foreign battlegrounds. It is now the USA which is used to discuss matters which were formerly used under American Presidents with slogans such as 'Crusade' or 'Holy War'. Omar El Akkad thus combines two main trends of Muslim writing which are characterized by bringing the narration into the West or by taking it back into the former colonies. By choosing a civil war as the background for his novel El Akkad mixes both trends while importing terror back to the USA which is to blame for it. American War is a novel which contains several elements thus being an important representative of contemporary English speaking literature.

A Child's Story of America

A Child's Story of America

Students are given a comprehensive overview of U.S. history from Columbus to the present. Review questions are included throughout, as well as helpful maps. The text contains numerous pictures and large print. Grade 4.

Children and War

A Historical Anthology

Children and War

How did a sleepy New England fishing village become a gay mecca? In this dynamic history, Karen Christel Krahulik explains why Provincetown, Massachusetts--alternately known as “Land's End,” “Cape-tip,” “Cape-end,” and, to some, “Queersville, U.S.A”--has meant many things to many people. Provincetown tells the story of this beguiling coastal town, from its early history as a mid-nineteenth century colonial village to its current stature as a bustling gay tourist destination. It details the many cultures and groups—Yankee artists, Portuguese fishermen, tourists—that have comprised and influenced Provincetown, and explains how all of them, in conjunction with larger economic and political forces, come together to create a gay and lesbian mecca. Through personal stories and historical accounts, Provincetown reveals the fascinating features that have made Provincetown such a textured and colorful destination: its fame as the landfall of the Mayflower Pilgrims, charm as an eccentric artists’ colony, and allure as a Dionysian playground. It also hints at one of Provincetown’s most dramatic economic changes: its turn from fishing village to resort town. From a history of fishing economies to a history of tourism, Provincetown, in the end, is as eclectic and vibrant as the city itself.

A Child's Adventure

Tragedy to Triumph

A Child's Adventure

William David writes in an economical style, conveying the extraordinary nature of the early childhood years. He captures childhood experiences, where the child has many first-time encounters and feels the joy of surprise in a world of daily adventure. The story unfolds around the life of a little boy caught up in the controlling influence of circumstances involving his parents and extended family, which culminates in the loss of all that he holds dear. A gradual and increasingly longer separation from his mother begins at three, until at five he suddenly is removed far away. In this story of undying hope, a little boy determines to endure his circumstances, and accepting his fate, learns the value of compassion, wisdom, and humility. He chooses to have faith in God, while accepting the ambiguity and ultimate mystery of life and existence. Sadness at times and loss may be inescapable in life, but the benefit at any age is priceless strength and endurance.

A Child's Guide to Biography

American Men of Action

A Child's Guide to Biography

Burton Egbert Stevenson (1872-1962) was born in Chillicothe, Ohio, and studied (1890-93) at Princeton. He was founder (1918) of the American Library in Paris and director (1918-20, 1925-30). For 58 years (1899-1957), Stevenson was Librarian of the City Library of Chillicothe, Ohio during which time he compiled anthologies, wrote historical fiction and childrens books, two travel books and a number of detective fiction novels, including "The Mystery of the Boule Cabinet" (1912), which was adapted for the film In the Next Room (1930).CONTENTSA Talk About BiographyThe BeginnersWashington to LincolnLincoln and His SuccessorsStatesmenPioneersGreat SoldiersGreat Sailors