A Commentary on Virgil

Aeneid VIII

A Commentary on Virgil

This book is a great historian's vivid and insightful episodic reflections on his life, from his childhood as a confident, clever little boy to his energetic old age in the present day.

A Commentary on Virgil, Eclogues

A Commentary on Virgil, Eclogues

Surprising though it may seem, this is the first full-scale scholarly commentary in English on Virgil's Eclogues. Written between about 42 and 35 BC, these ten short pastorals are among the best known poems in Latin literature. They have inspired numerous poets - Sidney, Ronsard, and others - and at the same time have held enduring fascination among scholars for their sophistaicated and allusive blend of Theocritean idyll and contemporary Roman history. Professor Clausen's commentary will provide a comprehensive guide to the poems and the considerable scholarship surrounding them, and should be indispensable to all serious students of Virgil's poetry. Special attention is paid throughout the commentary to the important question of Virgil's use of Theocritus and other Hellenistic poets, with translations provided of all Greek passages. There are many new and illuminating observations on Virgil's poetic style and vocabulary, often with reference to his Latin predecessors: Lucretius, Catullus and (virtually unnoticed by previous scholars) Plautus. A third feature of the commentary is a new examination of the plants and trees in the poems - both their exact identification and their significance. There are helpful introductions to each poem, as well as a comprehensive general introduction to the Eclogues as a whole, in which Professor Clausen discusses the nature of ancient pastoral poetry, the structure of the Eclogues, and the composition of a pastoral landscape by Virgil and Theocritus.

Virgil, "Aeneid" 6

A Commentary

Virgil,

Working “in the shadow of Eduard Norden” in the author’s own words, Nicholas Horsfall has written his own monumental commentary on Aeneid 6. This is Horsfall’s fifth large-scale commentary on the Aeneid, and as his earlier commentaries on books 7, 11, 3, and 2, this is not a commentary aimed at undergraduates. Horsfall is a commentators’ commentator writing with encyclopedic command of Virgilian scholarship for the most demanding reader. Volume One includes the introduction, text and translation, and bibliography,Volume Two includes the commentary, appendices, and indices.

Virgil, Aeneid 3

A Commentary

Virgil, Aeneid 3

Introduction, text and translation, detailed commentary and indices to Aeneid 3 are here offered on a scale not previously attempted and in keeping with the author's previous Virgil commentaries (Aeneid 7 and 11); the volume is aimed primarily at scholars, rather than undergraduates.

Virgil, Aeneid 2

Virgil, Aeneid 2

Introduction, text and translation, detailed commentary and indices to "Aeneid" 2 are here offered on a scale not previously attempted and in keeping with the author's previous Virgil commentaries ("Aeneid" 3, 7 and 11); the volume is aimed primarily at scholars, rather than undergraduates.

Servius and Commentary on Virgil

Bernardo Lecture Series, No. 5

Servius and Commentary on Virgil

Servius and Commentary on Vergil is the fifth in a series of publications occasioned by the annual Bernardo Lecture at the Center for Medieval and Early Renaissance Studies (CEMERS) at Binghamton University. This series offers public lectures which have been given by distinguished medieval and Renaissance scholars on topics and figures representative of these two important historical, religious, and intellectual periods.

A Commentary on Martial, Epigrams

A Commentary on Martial, Epigrams

Henriksén offers the first extensive commentary on Book 9 of the Epigrams of M. Valerius Martialis. The book consists of an introduction discussing the date, characteristics, structure, and themes of Book 9, followed by a detailed commentary on each of the 105 poems, which places them in their literary, social, and historical context.

A Commentary on Horace's Epodes

A Commentary on Horace's Epodes

This is by far the most detailed commentary yet on Horace's Epodes. The line-by-line commentary on each epode is prefaced by a substantial interpretative essay which offers a reading of that poem and synthesises existing scholarship. These essays, the first of their kind, will provideessential critical orientation to undergraduates approaching the Epode-book for the first time. Moreover, the scale and density of the commentary will make it an invaluable resource for scholars of Latin poetry. A particular feature is the first in-depth treatment of the two lengthy magical Epodes 5and 17. The author draws extensively on ancient magical texts preserved on papyrus and lead, as well as the recent flood of publications on Greek and Roman magic, to cast light on countless details in these epodes which reveal a marked familiarity on Horace's part with authentic magical belief andpractice.