A Companion to the Catholic Enlightenment in Europe

This book offers the first comprehensive overview of the Catholic Enlightenment in Europe. It surveys the diversity of views about the structure and nature of the movement, pointing toward the possibilities for further research.

A Companion to the Catholic Enlightenment in Europe

This book offers the first comprehensive overview of the Catholic Enlightenment in Europe. It surveys the diversity of views about the structure and nature of the movement, pointing toward the possibilities for further research. The volume presents a series of comprehensive treatments on the process and interpretation of Catholic Enlightenment in France, Spain, Portugal, Poland, the Holy Roman Empire, Malta, Italy and the Habsburg territories. An introductory overview explores the varied meanings of Catholic Enlightenment and situates them in a series of intellectual and social contexts. The topics covered in this book are crucial for a proper understanding of the role and place not only of Catholicism in the eighteenth century, but also for the social and religious history of Modern Europe.

A Companion to the Catholic Enlightenment in Europe

In sum, Catholic Enlightenment in Spain encompasses all of the distinctly religiously-motivated and uniquely Spanish attempts at bringing science, reason, progress, and greater social utility to Catholicism. As in other areas of Europe, ...

A Companion to the Catholic Enlightenment in Europe

This book present the first comprehensive overview of the Catholic Enlightenment in Europe by a group of leading international scholars.

The Catholic Enlightenment

In Enlightenment and Catholicism in Europe: A Transnational History, edited by Ulrich L. Lehner and Jeffrey Burson, 1–37. ... In A Companion to the Catholic Enlightenment in Europe, edited by Ulrich L. Lehner and Michael Printy, 1–61.

The Catholic Enlightenment

The Catholic Enlightenment: A Global Anthology presents readers with accessible, translated selections from the writings of fifteen major Catholic Enlightenment authors. These early modern authors include women, priests, lay intellectuals, and bishops. Twelve of these figures are being brought into English for the first time. The purpose of the volume is to provide students, scholars, and interested non-specialists with a single point of departure to delve into the primary sources of the Catholic Enlightenment. This anthology shows the geographical and intellectual diversity of the Catholic Enlightenment, while also demonstrating significant threads of commonality in intellectual orientation. One strength of this volume is the geographical spread of the figures considered. Included are Catholic thinkers from England, the United States, Mexico, Spain, Portugal, Brazil, France, Portugal, and the Italian and German-speaking lands. Another strength of this volume is the breadth of subject matter treated – it features pastoral letters, mystical tracts, pedagogical treatises, political manifestos, and theological works. These texts elucidate Catholic Enlightenment views on topics such as the history of women’s education, liturgy and devotions, and the relationship between church and state. The co-editors, Ulrich Lehner and Shaun Blanchard, have assembled a team of international scholars from Europe and the Americas for this exciting project. Lehner is one of the central scholars behind the renewed interest in the Catholic Enlightenment. He co-edits the volume, contributes to the introduction, and introduces and translates two significant German-speaking figures. Shaun Blanchard, who has recently published a monograph on radical Catholic Enlightenment figures, also co-edits, contributes selections from two English-speaking figures and has completed the first English translation of a section of Lodovico Muratori’s landmark On the Regulated Devotion of a Christian since 1789.

Reform Catholicism and the International Suppression of the Jesuits in Enlightenment Europe

For recent literature on the subject, see Jeffrey D. Burson and Ulrich Lehner, eds., Enlightenment and Catholicism: A Transnational History (Notre Dame: Notre Dame University Press, 2014), especially Burson's introduction, 1–37; ...

Reform Catholicism and the International Suppression of the Jesuits in Enlightenment Europe

An investigation into the role of Reform Catholicism in the international suppression of the Jesuits in 1773​ The Jesuits devoted themselves to preaching the word of God, administering the sacraments, and spreading the faith by missions in both Europe and newly discovered lands abroad. But, in 1773, under intense pressure from the monarchs of Europe, the papacy suppressed the Society of Jesus, an act that reverberated from Europe to the Americas and Southeast Asia. In this scholarly history, Dale Van Kley argues that Reform Catholicism, not a secular Enlightenment, provided the justification for Catholic kings to suppress a society instituted by the papacy. Spanning the years from the mid‑sixteenth century to the onset of the French Revolution, and the Jesuit presence from China to Brazil, this is the only single volume in English to make coherent sense of the series of expulsions that add up to what was arguably the most important religious event in Europe of the time, resulting in the secularization of tens of thousands of Jesuits.

English Catholics and the Supernatural 1553 1829

English Catholics were not alone in seeing a purified Catholicism as the religion of the Enlightenment par ... faces of Catholic Enlightenment' in Lehner, U.L. and Printy, M., A Companion to the Catholic Enlightenment in Europe (Leiden: ...

English Catholics and the Supernatural  1553   1829

In spite of an upsurge in interest in the social history of the Catholic community and an ever-growing body of literature on early modern 'superstition' and popular religion, the English Catholic community's response to the invisible world of the preternatural and supernatural has remained largely neglected. Addressing this oversight, this book explores Catholic responses to the supernatural world, setting the English Catholic community in the contexts of the wider Counter-Reformation and the confessional culture of early modern England. In so doing, it fulfils the need for a study of how English Catholics related to manifestations of the devil (witchcraft and possession) and the dead (ghosts) in the context of Catholic attitudes to the supernatural world as a whole (including debates on miracles). The study further provides a comprehensive examination of the ways in which English Catholics deployed exorcism, the church's ultimate response to the devil. Whilst some aspects of the Catholic response have been touched on in the course of broader studies, few scholars have gone beyond the evidence contained within anti-Catholic polemical literature to examine in detail what Catholics themselves said and thought. Given that Catholics were consistently portrayed as 'superstitious' in Protestant literature, the historian must attend to Catholic voices on the supernatural in order to avoid a disastrously unbalanced view of Catholic attitudes. This book provides the first analysis of the Catholic response to the supernatural and witchcraft and how it related to a characteristic Counter-Reformation preoccupation, the phenomenon of exorcism.

Culture of Enlightening

... in Spain and Its Empire, 1759–1808 (Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2008); Andrea J. Smidt, “Luces por la Fe: The Cause of Catholic Enlightenment in 18th-Century Spain,” in A Companion to the Catholic Enlightenment in Europe, ed.

Culture of Enlightening

Recent scholarly and popular attempts to define the Enlightenment, account for its diversity, and evaluate its historical significance suffer from a surprising lack of consensus at a time when the social and political challenges of today cry out for a more comprehensive and serviceable understanding of its importance. This book argues that regnant notions of the Enlightenment, the Radical Enlightenment, and the multitude of regional and religious enlightenments proposed by scholars all share an entangled intellectual genealogy rooted in a broader revolutionary "culture of enlightening" that took shape over the long-arc of intellectual history from the waning of the sixteenth-century Reformations to the dawn of the Atlantic Revolutionary era. Generated in competition for a changing readership and forged in dialog and conflict, dynamic and diverse notions of what it meant to be enlightened constituted a broader culture of enlightening from which the more familiar strains of the Enlightenment emerged, often ironically and accidentally, from originally religious impulses and theological questioning. By adapting, for the first time, methodological insights from the scholarship of historical entanglement (l'histoire croisée) to the study of the Enlightenment, this book provides a new interpretation of the European republic of letters from the late 1600s through the 1700s by focusing on the lived experience of the long-neglected Catholic theologian, historian, and contributor to Diderot's Encyclopédie, Abbé Claude Yvon. The ambivalent historical memory of Yvon, as well as the eclectic and global array of his sources and endeavors, Burson argues, can serve as a gauge for evaluating historical transformations in the surprisingly diverse ways in which eighteenth-century individuals spoke about enlightening human reason, religion, and society. Ultimately, Burson provocatively claims that even the most radical fruits of the Enlightenment can be understood as the unintended offspring of a revolution in theology and the cultural history of religious experience.

The Synod of Pistoia and Vatican II

The Catholic Enlightenment: The Forgotten History of a Global Movement. ... In Lehner and Printy, Companion to the Catholic Enlightenment in Europe, 1–61. ... Enlightenment and Catholicism in Europe: A Transnational History.

The Synod of Pistoia and Vatican II

In this book, Shaun Blanchard argues that the roots of the Vatican II reforms must be pushed back beyond the widely acknowledged twentieth-century forerunners of the Council, beyond Newman and the Tübingen School in the nineteenth century, to the eighteenth century, when a variety of reform movements attempted ressourcement and aggiornamento. This close study of the Synod of Pistoia (1786) sheds surprising new light on the nature of church reform and the roots of the Second Vatican Council (1962-65). The high-water mark of the late Jansenist reform movement, this Tuscan diocesan synod was harshly condemned by Pope Pius VI in the Bull Auctorem fidei (1794), and in the increasingly ultramontane nineteenth-century Church the late Jansenist movement was totally discredited. Nevertheless, much of the Pistoian agenda--an exaltation of the role of the local bishop, an emphasis on infallibility as a gift to the entire believing community, religious liberty, a more comprehensible liturgy that incorporates the vernacular, and the encouragement of lay Bible reading and Christocentric devotions--would be officially promulgated at Vatican II. Investigating the theological and historical context and nature of the reforms enacted by the Synod of Pistoia, he notes their parallels with the reforms of Vatican II, and argues that these connections are deeper than mere affinity. The tumultuous events surrounding the reception of the Synod explain why these reforms failed at the time. This book also offers a measured theological judgment on whether the Synod of Pistoia was "true or false reform." Although the Pistoians were completely rejected in their own day, the Second Vatican Council struggled with, and ultimately enacted, remarkably similar ideas.

Women Enlightenment and Catholicism

A Companion to the Catholic Enlightenment in Europe. Leiden: Brill, 63–125. Darnton, Robert. 2012. Review of The French Book Trade in Enlightenment Europe, 1769–1794 (review no. 1355). Online: www.history.ac.uk/reviews/review/1355.

Women  Enlightenment and Catholicism

Women, Enlightenment and Catholicism explores, for the first time, the uncharted territory of women’s religious Enlightenment. Each chapter offers a biographical insight into the social and cultural context of female Enlighteners and how Catholic women in Europe used the thought and values of Enlightenment to articulate their beliefs about how to live their faith in the world. The collection of portraits within this book offers a closer look into the new understanding of womanhood that emerged from Enlightenment culture and was conceived independently from marital relationships. They also highlight the distinctive contributions that women made to political and religious philosophy, spirituality and mysticism, and the efforts to bring scientific knowledge to the attention of other women. Guiding readers through the complex religious, intellectual and global connections influenced by the Enlightenment, Women, Enlightenment and Catholicism brings the achievements of Enlightenment women to the foreground and restores them to their rightful place in intellectual history. It is ideal reading for scholars and students of Enlightenment history, early modern religion and early modern women’s history.

Katholische Aufkl rung in Europa und Nordamerika

The Global History of a Forgotten Movement«6 wird vor allem Nordamerika – und hier insonderheit das Gebiet der ... In: Hg. Ulrich L. Lehner, Michael Printy: A Companion to the Catholic Enlightenment in Europe, Leiden / Boston 2010, ...

Katholische Aufkl  rung in Europa und Nordamerika

Die Katholische Aufklärung kann als weltumspannende Reformbewegung gedeutet werden. Im transatlantischen Raum war sie besonders wirksam. Die Katholische Aufklärung wirkte global, verfügte jedoch mit Europa und Nordamerika über ein besonders eng miteinander verflochtenes Betätigungsfeld. Es waren nicht zuletzt die britischen Kolonien Maryland und Pennsylvania, in denen aufgeklärte Katholiken, die sich aus Europa in die Neue Welt aufgemacht hatten, mit großem Erfolg agierten. Als 1776 die Vereinigten Staaten von Amerika gegründet wurden, konnten sie dort noch im ausgehenden 18. Jahrhundert unter Beweis stellen, dass der von ihnen gelebte Katholizismus mit einem von den Grundsätzen der politischen Aufklärung geprägten republikanisch-demokratischen Staatswesen vollständig in Einklang zu bringen war. Dies blieb auch für das katholische Selbstverständnis in Europa nicht ohne Wirkung - sichtbar auf den Gebieten der Erziehung und Bildung, der Religion und Theologie, der Politik und Staatstheorie, der Literatur und Öffentlichkeit, der Malerei und Architektur sowie der Musik und des Theaters.

Beda Mayr Vertheidigung Der Katholischen Religion 1789

Kontler, László, “What is the (Historians') Enlightenment Today?” European Review of History 13 (2006): 357–371. Korber, Norbert, Bitte an die ... Brill's Companion to the Catholic Enlightenment in Europe. (Leiden: 2009, forthcoming).

Beda Mayr  Vertheidigung Der Katholischen Religion  1789

Despite the importance the monks had as carriers of programmatic Enlightenment ideas, few of their original texts are available in modern editions. This edition contributes to filling this lacuna by publishing Dom Beda Mayra (TM)s (1742a "1794) ecumenical Catholic theology.

Catholicism Identity and Politics in the Age of Enlightenment

History Compass, vol. 8, no. 2 (2010), pp. 166–78; Ulrich L. Lehner and Michael Printy, eds, A Companion to the Catholic Enlightenment in Europe (Leiden, 2010); Marshall and Scott, 'Introduction: The Catholic Gentry in English Society', ...

Catholicism  Identity and Politics in the Age of Enlightenment

Explores the changing aspirations, attitudes and identities of English Catholics in the late eighteenth century

Our Dear Bought Liberty

Patrick W. Carey, “American Catholicism and the Enlightenment Ethos,” in Knowledge and Belief in America: Enlightenment Traditions ... “The Catholic Enlightenment in Portugal,” in A Companion to the Catholic Enlightenment in Europe, ed.

Our Dear Bought Liberty

How early American Catholics justified secularism and overcame suspicions of disloyalty, transforming ideas of religious liberty in the process. In colonial America, Catholics were presumed dangerous until proven loyal. Yet Catholics went on to sign the Declaration of Independence and helped to finalize the First Amendment to the Constitution. What explains this remarkable transformation? Michael Breidenbach shows how Catholic leaders emphasized their church’s own traditions—rather than Enlightenment liberalism—to secure the religious liberty that enabled their incorporation in American life. Catholics responded to charges of disloyalty by denying papal infallibility and the pope’s authority to intervene in civil affairs. Rome staunchly rejected such dissent, but reform-minded Catholics justified their stance by looking to conciliarism, an intellectual tradition rooted in medieval Catholic thought yet compatible with a republican view of temporal independence and church-state separation. Drawing on new archival material, Breidenbach finds that early American Catholic leaders, including Maryland founder Cecil Calvert and members of the prominent Carroll family, relied on the conciliarist tradition to help institute religious toleration, including the Maryland Toleration Act of 1649. The critical role of Catholics in establishing American church–state separation enjoins us to revise not only our sense of who the American founders were, but also our understanding of the sources of secularism. Church–state separation in America, generally understood as the product of a Protestant-driven Enlightenment, was in key respects derived from Catholic thinking. Our Dear-Bought Liberty therefore offers a dramatic departure from received wisdom, suggesting that religious liberty in America was not bestowed by liberal consensus but partly defined through the ingenuity of a persecuted minority.

Enlightened Monks

'The Many Faces of the Catholic Enlightenment,' in Lehner and Printy (eds.), Brill's Companion to the Catholic Enlightenment in Europe, 1–6. —— 'What is Catholic Enlightenment?' History Compass 8 (2010): 166–78. —— (ed.) ...

Enlightened Monks

A revisionist account of the effects of the Enlightenment process on German Benedictines which contributes to a better understanding not only of monastic culture in Central Europe, but also of Catholic religious culture in general.

The Huguenots of Paris and the Coming of Religious Freedom 1685 1789

39 Jeffrey D. Burson, 'The Catholic Enlightenment in France from the Fin de Siècle Crisis of Consciousness to the Revolution, 1750–1789', inA Companion to the Catholic Enlightenment in Europe, ed. Ulrich L. Lehner and Michael Printy ...

The Huguenots of Paris and the Coming of Religious Freedom  1685   1789

How did the Huguenots of Paris survive, and even prosper, in the eighteenth century when the majority Catholic population was notorious for its hostility to Protestantism? Why, by the end of the Old Regime, did public opinion overwhelmingly favour giving Huguenots greater rights? This study of the growth of religious toleration in Paris traces the specific history of the Huguenots after Louis XIV revoked the Edict of Nantes in 1685. David Garrioch identifies the roots of this transformation of attitudes towards the minority Huguenot population in their own methods of resistance to persecution and pragmatic government responses to it, as well as in the particular environment of Paris. Above all, this book identifies the extraordinary shift in Catholic religious culture that took place over the century as a significant cause of change, set against the backdrop of cultural and intellectual transformation that we call the Enlightenment.

Malleable Anatomies

A Companion to the Catholic Enlightenment in Europe (Leiden: Brill, 2010), 3–4. On the Catholic Enlightenment see, for instance, Bernard Plongeron, 'Recherches sur l' “Aufklärung" catholique en Europe occidentale (1770–1830), ...

Malleable Anatomies

Malleable Anatomies offers an account of the early stages of the practice of anatomical modelling in mid-eighteenth-century Italy. It investigates the 'mania' for anatomical displays that swept the Italian peninsula, and traces the fashioning of anatomical models as important social, cultural, and political as well as medical tools. Over the course of the eighteenth century, anatomical specimens offered particularly accurate insights into the inner body. Being coloured, soft, malleable, and often life-size, they promised to foster anatomical knowledge for different audiences in a delightful way. But how did anatomical models and preparations inscribe and mediate bodily knowledge? How did they change the way in which anatomical knowledge was created and communicated? And how did they affect the lives of those involved in their production, display, viewing, and handling? Examining the circumstances surrounding the creation and early viewing of anatomical displays in Bologna and Naples, Malleable Anatomies addresses these questions by reconstructing how anatomical modelling developed at the intersection of medical discourse, religious ritual, antiquarian and artistic cultures, and Grand Tour display. While doing so, it investigates the development of anatomical modelling in the context of the diverse worlds of visual and material practices that characterized the representation and display of the body in mid-eighteenth-century Italy. Drawing attention to the artisanal dimension of anatomical practice, and to the role of women as both makers and users of anatomical models, it considers how anatomical specimens lay at the centre of a composite world of social interactions, which led to the fashioning of modellers as anatomical celebrities. Moreover, it examines how anatomical displays transformed the proverbially gruesome practice of anatomy into an enthralling experience that engaged audiences' senses.

English Jesuit Education

4 For an important contribution to this debate, see Ulrich L. Lehner and Michael Printy (eds), A Companion to the Catholic Enlightenment in Europe (Leiden and Boston: Brill, 2010). This book explores, in a series of essays, the Catholic ...

English Jesuit Education

Analysing a period of 'hidden history', this book tracks the fate of the English Jesuits and their educational work through three major international crises of the eighteenth century: · the Lavalette affair, a major financial scandal, not of their making, which annihilated the Society of Jesus in France and led to the forced flight of exiled English Jesuits and their students from France to the Austrian Netherlands in 1762; · the universal suppression of the Jesuit order in 1773 and the English Jesuits' remarkable survival of that event, following a second forced flight to the safety of the Principality of Liège; · the French Revolution and their narrow escape from annihilation in Liège in 1794, resulting in a third forced flight with their students, this time to England. Despite repeated crises, huge adversity and multiple losses of personnel, property and educational goods, including significant libraries, the suppressed English Jesuits reconfigured themselves. Modernising their curriculum, they influenced the development of Jesuit education not only in the United Kingdom, but also in the nascent United States of America: in 1789, their influence contributed to the founding of Georgetown Academy, which later developed into the present-day Georgetown University in Washington, DC. English Jesuit Education is a unique story of educational survival and development against seemingly impossible odds, drawing on hitherto largely unexplored material in a wide range of archives.

The Enlightenment History Documents and Key Questions

Kant, Immanuel, An Answer to the Question: What is Enlightenment? Trans. H. B. Nisbet (London: Penguin, 1991). Lehner, Ulrich L., and Michael Printy (eds.), A Companion to the Catholic Enlightenment in Europe (Leiden: Brill, 2010).

The Enlightenment  History  Documents  and Key Questions

Based on the most recent scholarship, this book provides students and interested lay readers with a basic introduction to key facts and current controversies concerning the Enlightenment. • Provides the Enlightenment in various formats, thereby enabling students to better understand and fully appreciate its causes and effects • Develops critical thinking skills through the interplay of primary and secondary sources • Includes argumentative essays that showcase the diversity of informed opinions on the modern Enlightenment • Supports NCHS World History content standards for Era 6, Standard 2E

God in the Enlightenment

Stewart J. Brown and Timothy Hackett (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2006), 283–301; Ulrich L. Lehner and Michael Printy, eds., A Companion to the Catholic Enlightenment in Europe (Leiden: Brill, 2010); Michael Printy, ...

God in the Enlightenment

We have long been taught that the Enlightenment was an attempt to free the world from the clutches of Christian civilization and make it safe for philosophy. The lesson has been well learned. In today's culture wars, both liberals and their conservative enemies, inside and outside the academy, rest their claims about the present on the notion that the Enlightenment was a secularist movement of philosophically driven emancipation. Historians have had doubts about the accuracy of this portrait for some time, but they have never managed to furnish a viable alternative to it-for themselves, for scholars interested in matters of church and state, or for the public at large. In this book, William J. Bulman and Robert G. Ingram bring together recent scholarship from distinguished experts in history, theology, and literature to make clear that God not only survived the Enlightenment but thrived within it as well. The Enlightenment was not a radical break from the past in which Europeans jettisoned their intellectual and institutional inheritance. It was, to be sure, a moment of great change, but one in which the characteristic convictions and traditions of the Renaissance and Reformation were perpetuated to the point of transformation, in the wake of the Wars of Religion and during the early phases of globalization. The Enlightenment's primary imperatives were not freedom and irreligion but peace and prosperity. As a result, Enlightenment could be Christian, communitarian, or authoritarian as easily as it could be atheistic, individualistic, or libertarian. Honing in on the intellectual crisis of the late seventeenth and early eighteenth centuries while moving from Spinoza to Kant and from India to Peru, God in the Enlightenment takes a prism to the age of lights.

A Cultural History of the Senses in the Age of Enlightenment

Johnson, J. H., 1995, Listening in Paris: a cultural history, Berkeley, CA: University of California Press. ... in U. L. Lehner and M. Printy (eds), A Companion to the Catholic Enlightenment in Europe, Leiden and Boston, MA: Brill.

A Cultural History of the Senses in the Age of Enlightenment

This volume examines the varied ways in which the senses were perceived afresh during the Enlightenment. In addition to introducing new philosophical and scientific models which sometimes upended the classic hierarchy of the senses, this period witnessed major changes in living and working habits, including urbanization, travel and exploration, the invention of new sonic and visual media, and the rise of comfort and pleasure as values that cut across a range of social classes. As this volume shows, those developments inspired a wealth of sensorially stimulating styles of design, art, music, poetry, foodstuffs, material goods and modes of worship and entertainment. The volume also demonstrates the period's countervailing concern with managing the senses, evident in fields like natural philosophy, medicine, education, religion, and public hygiene. Finally, it explores some of the Enlightenment's desensualizing tendencies, like the separation of sensuous body from discerning mind in certain arenas of science and manufacturing, and the late 18th-century shift away from a politics of publicity, or intense visual and aural scrutiny, toward the secret ballot. A Cultural History of the Senses in the Age of Enlightenment presents essays on the following topics: the social life of the senses; urban sensations; the senses in the marketplace; the senses in religion; the senses in philosophy and science; medicine and the senses; the senses in literature; art and the senses; and sensory media.

Science in the Vanished Arcadia

The Cause of Catholic Enlightenment in 18thCentury Spain,” in Lehner and Printy, Brill's Companion to the Catholic Enlightenment in Europe, 403–452. There is much literature on Iberian American Catholic Enlightenment.

Science in the Vanished Arcadia

In Science in the Vanished Arcadia Miguel de Asúa provides the first modern comprehensive account of Jesuit science in the missions of Paraguay and the River Plate region during the 17th and 18th centuries.