A Companion to the Eucharist in the Reformation

This collection of articles by European and American scholars offers an introduction to the Eucharist in the Reformation, as theology, liturgy, and wellspring for thinking about the relationship between the sensible world and God.

A Companion to the Eucharist in the Reformation

This collection of articles by European and American scholars offers an introduction to the Eucharist in the Reformation, as theology, liturgy, and wellspring for thinking about the relationship between the sensible world and God.

A Companion to the Reformation in Central Europe

furnishings despite the spread of first Lutheran and then Reformed ideas to the city.31 In Transylvania we find an equally ... “The art of the liturgy: the Lutheran tradition,” in A Companion to the Eucharist in the Reformation, eds.

A Companion to the Reformation in Central Europe

A Companion to the Reformation in Central Europe analyses the history of Christianity from the 15th to the 18th centuries in the lands between the Baltic and Adriatic seas.

Peter Paul Rubens and the Counter Reformation Crisis of the Beati moderni

A Companion to the Eucharist in the Reformation. Leiden: Brill, 2014. Rubin, Corpus Christi, 121– 123 and 308–309. See also Bynum, Wonderful Blood, 2–4, 25, 28, 31; Eadem., “Seeing and Seeing Beyond: the Mass of St. Gregory in the ...

Peter Paul Rubens and the Counter Reformation Crisis of the Beati moderni

Peter Paul Rubens and the Crisis of the Beati Moderni takes up the question of the issues involved in the formation of recent saints - or Beati moderni (modern Blesseds) as they were called - by the Jesuits and Oratorians in the new environment of increased strictures and censorship that developed after the Council of Trent with respect to legal canonization procedures and cultic devotion to the saints. Ruth Noyes focuses particularly on how the new regulations pertained to the creation of emerging cults of those not yet canonized, the so-called Beati moderni, such as Jesuit founders Francis Xavier and Ignatius Loyola, and Filippo Neri, founder of the Oratorians. Centrally involved in the book is the question of the fate and meaning of the two altarpiece paintings commissioned by the Oratorians from Peter Paul Rubens. The Congregation rejected his first altarpiece because it too specifically identified Filippo Neri as a cult figure to be venerated (before his actual canonization) and thus was caught up in the politics of cult formation and the papacy’s desire to control such pre-canonization cults. The book demonstrates that Rubens' second altarpiece, although less overtly depicting Neri as a saint, was if anything more radical in the claims it made for him. Peter Paul Rubens and the Crisis of the Beati Moderni offers the first comparative study of Jesuit and Oratorian images of their respective would-be saints, and the controversy they ignited across Church hierarchies. It is also the first work to examine provocative Philippine imagery and demonstrate how its bold promotion specifically triggered the first wave of curial censure in 1602.

Worshiping with the Reformers

Catholic theologians after Trent wrestled with how to explain the reality of the Mass as a sacrifice without ignoring or downplaying ... 4Gary Macy, “The Medieval Inheritance” in A Companion to the Eucharist in the Reformation, ed.

Worshiping with the Reformers

In this RCS companion volume, Karin Maag takes readers inside the worshiping life of the church during the Reformation. Exploring several aspects of the church's worship, she considers what it was like to attend church, reforms in preaching, the function of prayer, how Christians experienced the sacraments, and the roles of both visual art and music in worship.

The Eucharist in Medieval Canon Law

12 John Calvin and Jacopo Sadoleto, A Reformation Debate, trans. John C. Olin (New York, 1966), 41, 70–71. 13 John D. Rempel, “Anabaptist Theologies of the Eucharist,” in A Companion to the Eucharist in the Reformation ...

The Eucharist in Medieval Canon Law

Thomas Izbicki presents a new examination of the relationship between the adoration of the sacrament and canon law from the twelfth to fifteenth centuries. The medieval Church believed Christ's glorified body was present in the Eucharist, the most central of the seven sacraments, and the Real Presence became explained as transubstantiation by university-trained theologians. Expressions of this belief included the drama of the elevated host and chalice, as well as processions with a host in an elaborate monstrance on the Feast of Corpus Christi. These affirmations of doctrine were governed by canon law, promulgated by popes and councils; and liturgical regulations were enforced by popes, bishops, archdeacons and inquisitors. Drawing on canon law collections and commentaries, synodal enactments, legal manuals and books about ecclesiastical offices, Izbicki presents the first systematic analysis of the Church's teaching about the regulation of the practice of the Eucharist.

A Companion to Anglican Eucharistic Theology

This book presents case studies from the Reformation to the Nineteenth Century and avoids the hermeneutic idealism of particular church parties by critically examining the Anglican eucharistic tradition.

A Companion to Anglican Eucharistic Theology

Anglican eucharistic theology varies between the different philosophical assumptions of realism and nominalism. This book presents case studies from the Reformation to the Nineteenth Century and avoids the hermeneutic idealism of particular church parties by critically examining the Anglican eucharistic tradition.

Richard Hooker and Reformed Orthodoxy

For the sacramental theology of the Reformers see Lee Palmer Wandel, The Eucharist in the Reformation: Incarnation and Liturgy (New York: Cambridge University Press, 2006); Lee Palmer Wandel, ed., A Companion to the Eucharist in the ...

Richard Hooker and Reformed Orthodoxy

For more than forty years now there has been a steady stream of interest in Richard Hooker. This renaissance in Hooker Studies began with the publication of the Folger Library Edition of the Works of Richard Hooker. With this renaissance has come a growing recognition that it is anachronistic to classify Hooker simply as an Anglican thinker, but as yet, no generally agreed-upon alternative label, or context for his thought, has replaced this older conception; in particular, the question of Hooker’s Reformed identity remains hotly contested. Given the relatively limited engagement of Hooker scholarship with other branches of Reformation and early modern scholarship to date, there is a growing recognition that Hooker must be evaluated not only against the context of English puritanism and conformism but also in light of his broad international Reformed context. At the same time, it has become clear that, if this is so, scholars of continental Reformed orthodoxy must take stock of Hooker’s work as one of the landmark theological achievements of the era.This volume aims to facilitate this long-needed conversation, bringing together a wide range of scholars to consider Richard Hooker’s theology within the full context of late 16th- and early 17th-century Reformed orthodoxy, both in England and on the Continent. The essays seek to bring Hooker into conversation not merely with contemporaries familiar to Hooker scholarship, such as William Perkins, but also with such contemporaries as Jerome Zanchi and Franciscus Junius, predecessors such as Heinrich Bullinger, and successors such as John Davenant, John Owen, and Hugo Grotius. In considering how these successors of Hooker identified themselves in relation to his theology, these essays will also shed light on how Hooker was perceived within 17th-century Reformed circles. The theological topics touched on in the course of these essays include such central issues as the doctrine of Scripture, predestination, Christology, soteriology, the sacraments, and law. It is hoped that these essays will continue to stimulate further research on these important questions among a wide community of scholars.

Cultures of Communication

7 For a sense of the richness of Eucharistic thinking in the period between the late Roman Empire and the ... For an introduction to Reformation debates more generally, see A Companion to the Eucharist in the Reformation, part 1.

Cultures of Communication

Contrary to the historiographical commonplace “no Reformation without print” Cultures of Communication examines media in the early modern world through the lens of the period’s religious history. Looking beyond the emergence of print, this collection of ground-breaking essays highlights the pivotal role of theology in the formation of the early modern cultures of communication. The authors assembled here urge us to understand the Reformation as a response to the perceived crisis of religious communication in late medieval Europe. In addition, they explore the novel demands placed on European media ecology by the acceleration and intensification of global interconnectedness in the early modern period. As the Christian evangelizing impulse began to propel growing numbers of Europeans outward to the Americas and Asia, theories and practices of religious communication had to be reformed to accommodate an array of new communicative constellations – across distances, languages, cultures.

A Reformation Life The European Reformation through the Eyes of Philipp of Hesse

A Companion to the Eucharist in the Reformation. Brill's Companions to the Christian Tradition, text. Wandel, Lee Palmer. The Eucharist in the Reformation: Incarnation and Liturgy. Cambridge; New York: Cambridge University Press, 2006.

A Reformation Life  The European Reformation through the Eyes of Philipp of Hesse

This title presents the European Reformation as seen through the life of an important but little-known participant—Philipp of Hesse, a nobleman who became a Reformation leader in Germany. • Provides a fresh approach to a curricular staple topic that is critical to the understanding of early modern history, the history of religion, and the current state of Christianity • Enables readers to understand how the events of the Reformation unfolded by viewing the events through the perspective of one man central to the cause and demonstrating how certain individuals' convictions led to the theology that followed

The Eucharist Mystery of Presence Sacrifice and Communion

“Communion for the Divorced and Remarried: Why Revisionists in Moral Theology Should Reject Kasper's Proposal.” Nova et Vetera (English) 13, no. 3 (2015): 765–85. Wandel, Lee Palmer, ed. A Companion to the Eucharist in the Reformation.

The Eucharist  Mystery of Presence  Sacrifice  and Communion

The Eucharist: Mystery of Presence, Sacrifice, and Communion explores the three ends of the Sacrament of Sacraments: God’s true presence, His redemptive sacrifice, and spiritual nourishment through communion with Him. In this follow-up to his groundbreaking work, Faith Comes From What Is Heard, Lawrence Feingold constructs a biblical vision of the Eucharist from its prefigurement in the Old Testament to its fulfillment in the New and presents the Eucharistic theology of the Church Fathers, St. Thomas Aquinas, and magisterial teaching from centuries past through today. The Eucharist is a masterful text, both challenging and spiritually rich, that comprehensively examines the unspeakable mystery that is the Eucharist.

Memory and the English Reformation

See Hutton, 'English Reformation and the Evidence of Folklore'; Alexandra Walsham, 'Recording Superstition in Early Modern ... Companion to the Eucharist in the Reformation (Leiden, 2014); Karen Spierling, Infant Baptism in Reformation ...

Memory and the English Reformation

Recasts the Reformation as a battleground over memory, in which new identities were formed through acts of commemoration, invention and repression.

The Oxford Handbook of the Protestant Reformations

Mainly about Catholicism is Alexander J. Fisher, “The Sounds of Eucharistic Culture,” in Wandel, Companion to the Eucharist, 445–465. 55. Karant- Nunn, The Reformation of Feeling: Shaping the Religious Emotions in Early Modern Germany ...

The Oxford Handbook of the Protestant Reformations

This Handbook takes a broad overview of the Protestant Reformations, seeing them as movements which stretched far beyond their European beginnings. Written by a team of international scholars of history and theology, the contributions offer up-to-date perspectives on Reformation ideas and the lasting historical impact of Protestantism.

The Eucharist in the Reformation

The first major study of the the Eucharist that divided Western Christendom in the sixteen century.

The Eucharist in the Reformation

The first major study of the the Eucharist that divided Western Christendom in the sixteen century.

Prayers of the Eucharist

Early and Reformed R.C.D. Jasper, G.J. Cuming Paul F. Bradshaw, Maxwell E. Johnson. Bradshaw and Johnson, The Eucharistic Liturgies, ... Nicolas Wolterstorff, “John Calvin,” in A Companion to the Eucharist in the Reformation, ed.

Prayers of the Eucharist

This classic work, previously edited by Ronald Jasper and Geoffrey Cuming, has been a staple source in teaching liturgy to generations of students in colleges, seminaries, and universities. It has now been comprehensively revised for future generations of liturgical scholars. Updates include: New introductions that take into account the substantial changes in recent scholarship New groupings of the various prayers into liturgical “families” in order to make their relationships clearer Plus, new bibliographies

Quid est sacramentum Volume One

became present 'under the form of bread and wine'.5 This was no Mass of Saint Gregory, where a vision of the suffering Christ appeared on the altar only ... A Companion to the Eucharist in the Reformation (Leiden – Boston: 2013) 13–37.

Quid est sacramentum  Volume One

An investigation into how sacred mysteries (in Latin, sacramenta or mysteria) were visualized in a wide range of media, including illustrated religious literature, produced in Italy, France, and the Low Countries between ca. 1500 and 1700.

Joseph Ratzinger and the Healing of Reformation Era Divisions

Alexandra Walsham describes well the remarkable change that the reformation brought to the spiritual landscape in ... A Companion to the Eucharist in the Middle Ages, Brill's Companions to the Christian Tradition 26 (Leiden: Brill, ...

Joseph Ratzinger and the Healing of Reformation Era Divisions

Edited by Emery de Gaál and Matthew Levering, Joseph Ratzinger and the Healing of Reformation-Era Divisions examines Joseph Ratzinger/Pope Benedict XVI’s manifold contributions to Catholic-Protestant theological reflection. The collection opens with an introduction comparing Ratzinger’s approach to ecumenism to that of Karl Rahner. Rahner argues that the structural uniting of Protestants and Catholics should take place now without worrying about doctrinal differences. In contrast, Ratzinger argues that unity in Christ requires probing the doctrinal differences and seeking a deeper understanding of the reasoning of each side—on the grounds that the truth of the Gospel that each side desires to preserve will ultimately be the basis for the only kind of Christian ecclesial unity worth having, namely, a unity of the basis of the truth of the Gospel of Jesus Christ. Detailed essays follow, treating a number of loci including papal primacy, ecumenical principles, liturgy, evangelization, Mariology, Christ’s birth and the celebration of Christmas, public theology, Christocentrism, Martin Luther, charity, conscience, missiology, justification, the reception of Ratzinger/Benedict in Radical Orthodoxy, and Scripture and Tradition. These essays run the full gamut of Ratzinger/Benedict’s major themes and preoccupations. Ten of the essays are by Catholic scholars, and seven by Protestant scholars. Contributors include many of the world’s leading Ratzinger experts, and the volume opens with an essay by Bishop Rudolf Voderholzer, Director of the Pope Benedict XVI Institute in Regensburg, Germany.

The Oxford Handbook of Reformed Theology

Baker , J. W. ( 1998 ) , ' Heinrich Bulllinger , the Covenant , and the Reformed Tradition in Retrospect , SCJ 29 : 359–76 . ... in L. Palmer Wandel ( ed ) , A Companion to the Eucharist in the Reformation , 57-74 ( Leiden : Brill ) .

The Oxford Handbook of Reformed Theology

The Oxford Handbook of Reformed Theology looks back to past resources that have informed Reformed theology and surveys present conversations among those engaged in Reformed theology today. First, the volume offers accounts of the major historical contexts of reformed theology, the various relationships (ancient and modern) which it maintains and from which it derives. Recent research has shown the intricate ties between the patristic and medieval heritage of the church and the work of the reformed movement in the sixteenth century. The past century has also witnessed an explosion of reformed theology outside the Western world, prompting a need for attention not only to these global voices but also to the unique (and contingent) history of reformed theology in the West (hence reflecting on its relationship to intellectual developments like scholastic method or the critical approaches of modern biblical studies). Second, the volume assesses some of the classic, representative texts of the reformed tradition, observing also their reception history. The reformed movement is not dominated by a single figure, but it does contain a host of paradigmatic texts that demonstrate the range and vitality of reformed thought on politics, piety, biblical commentary, dogmatic reflection, and social engagement. Third, the volume turns to key doctrines and topics that continue to receive attention by reformed theologians today. Contributors who are themselves making cutting edge contributions to constructive theology today reflect on the state of the question and offer their own proposals regarding a host of doctrinal topics and themes.

Parish Churches in the Early Modern World

Medieval Eucharistic Theology«, in I.C. Levy, G. Macy and K. van Ausdall (eds), A Companion to the Eucharist in the Middle Ages (Leiden, 2012), pp. ... A Companion to the Eucharist in the Reformation (Leiden, 2014), pp. 15¥ 37.

Parish Churches in the Early Modern World

Across Europe, the parish church has stood for centuries at the centre of local communities; it was the focal point of its religious life, the rituals performed there marked the stages of life from the cradle to the grave. Nonetheless the church itself artistically and architecturally stood apart from the parish community. It was often the largest and only stone-built building in a village; it was legally distinct being subject to canon law, as well as consecrated for the celebration of religious rites. The buildings associated with the "cure of souls" were sacred sites or holy places, where humanity interacted with the divine. In spite of the importance of the parish church, these buildings have generally not received the same attention from historians as non-parochial places of worship. This collection of essays redresses this balance and reflects on the parish church across a number of confessions - Catholic, Lutheran, Reformed and Anti-Trinitarian - during the early modern period. Rather than providing a series of case studies of individual buildings, each essay looks at the evolution of parish churches in response to religious reform as well as confessional change and upheaval. They examine aspects of their design and construction; furnishings and material culture; liturgy and the use of the parish church. While these essays range widely across Europe, the volume also considers how religious provision and the parish church were translated into a global context with colonial and commercial expansion in the Americas and Asia. This interdisciplinary volume seeks to identify what was distinctive about the parish church for the congregations that gathered in them for worship and for communities across the early modern world.

Rethinking Europe

In A Companion to the Eucharist in the Reformation, ed. Lee Palmer Wandel (Leiden: E.J. Brill, 2013), 13–37. Marzell, Heinrich. “Allermannsharnisch.” In Bächtold-Stäubli and Hoffmann-Krayer, HWDA, 1:264–267. Marzell, Heinrich. “Alraun.

Rethinking Europe

Rethinking Europe offers a selection of essays that reevaluate the Thirty Years’ War by contextualizing it within the broader history of the Reformation, military conflicts, peace initiatives, and negotiations of war in the early modern periods.

The Flesh of the Word

For instance, see Lee Palmer Wandel, ed., A Companion to the Eucharist in the Reformation, Brill's Companions to the Christian Tradition (Boston: Brill, 2014). For a beginning of a history of the second eucharistic controversy, ...

The Flesh of the Word

The extra Calvinisticum, the doctrine that the eternal Son maintains his existence beyond the flesh both during his earthly ministry and perpetually, divided the Lutheran and Reformed traditions during the Reformation. This book explores the emergence and development of the extra Calvinisticum in the Reformed tradition by tracing its first exposition from Ulrich Zwingli to early Reformed orthodoxy. Rather than being an ancillary issue, the questions surrounding the extra Calvinisticum were a determinative factor in the differentiation of Magisterial Protestantism into rival confessions. Reformed theologians maintained this doctrine in order to preserve the integrity of both Christ's divine and human natures as the mediator between God and humanity. This rationale remained consistent across this period with increasing elaboration and sophistication to meet the challenges leveled against the doctrine in Lutheran polemics. The study begins with Zwingli's early use of the extra Calvinisticum in the Eucharistic controversy with Martin Luther and especially as the alternative to Luther's doctrine of the ubiquity of Christ's human body. Over time, Reformed theologians, such as Peter Martyr Vermigli and Antione de Chandieu, articulated the extra Calvinisticum with increasing rigor by incorporating conciliar christology, the church fathers, and scholastic methodology to address the polemical needs of engagement with Lutheranism. The Flesh of the Word illustrates the development of christological doctrine by Reformed theologians offering a coherent historical narrative of Reformed christology from its emergence into the period of confessionalization. The extra Calvinisticum was interconnected to broader concerns affecting concepts of the union of Christ's natures, the communication of attributes, and the understanding of heaven.