A Deadly Wandering

A Mystery, a Landmark Investigation, and the Astonishing Science of Attention in the Digital Age

A Deadly Wandering

From Pulitzer Prize–winning journalist Matt Richtel, a brilliant, narrative-driven exploration of technology’s vast influence on the human mind and society, dramatically-told through the lens of a tragic “texting-while-driving” car crash that claimed the lives of two rocket scientists in 2006. In this ambitious, compelling, and beautifully written book, Matt Richtel, a Pulitzer Prize-winning reporter for the New York Times, examines the impact of technology on our lives through the story of Utah college student Reggie Shaw, who killed two scientists while texting and driving. Richtel follows Reggie through the tragedy, the police investigation, his prosecution, and ultimately, his redemption. In the wake of his experience, Reggie has become a leading advocate against “distracted driving.” Richtel interweaves Reggie’s story with cutting-edge scientific findings regarding human attention and the impact of technology on our brains, proposing solid, practical, and actionable solutions to help manage this crisis individually and as a society. A propulsive read filled with fascinating, accessible detail, riveting narrative tension, and emotional depth, A Deadly Wandering explores one of the biggest questions of our time—what is all of our technology doing to us?—and provides unsettling and important answers and information we all need.

Distracted Doctoring

Returning to Patient-Centered Care in the Digital Age

Distracted Doctoring

Examining-room computers require doctors to record detailed data about their patients, yet reduce the time clinicians can spend listening attentively to the very people they are trying to help. This book presents original essays by distinguished experts in their fields, addressing this critical problem and making an urgent case for reform, because while electronic technology has revolutionized the practice of medicine, it also poses a unique challenge to health care. Smartphones in the hands of doctors and nurses have become dangerously seductive devices that can endanger their patients. Distracted Doctoring is written for anesthesiologists and surgeons, as well as general practitioners, nurses, and health care administrators and students. Chapters include Electronic Challenges to Patient Safety and Care; Distraction, Disengagement, and the Purpose of Medicine; and Managing Distractions through Advocacy, Education, and Change.

Social Media

Enduring Principles

Social Media

Integrating the role of media in society with foundational research and theory, Social Media aims to open a well-structured, well-grounded conversation about media transition and its effects. Offering a comprehensive overview of topics, it covers not only cultural issues like online identityand community, but also tackles more analytical topics like social media measurement, network analysis, and social media economics at an introductory level.

Solitude

A Singular Life in a Crowded World

Solitude

Governor General's Award-winner Michael Harris explores the profound emotional and intellectual benefits of solitude, and how we may achieve it in our fast-paced world. The capacity to be alone--properly alone--is one of life's subtlest skills. Real solitude is a contented and productive state that garners tangible rewards: it allows us to reflect and recharge, improving our relationships with ourselves and, paradoxically, with others. Today, the zeitgeist embraces sharing like never before. Fueled by our dependence on online and social media, we have created an ecosystem of obsessive distraction that dangerously undervalues solitude. Many of us now lead lives of strangely crowded loneliness--we are ever-connected, but only shallowly so. Award-winning author Michael Harris examines why our experience of solitude has become so impoverished, and how we may grow to love it again in the frenzy of our digital landscape. Solitude is an optimistic and encouraging story about discovering true quiet inside the city, inside the crowd, inside our busy and urbane lives. Harris guides readers away from a life of ceaseless pings toward a state of measured connectivity, one that balances solitude and companionship. Rich with true stories about the life-changing power of solitude, and interwoven with reporting from the world's foremost brain researchers, psychologists and tech entrepreneurs, Solitude is a beautiful and convincing statement on the benefits of being alone.

Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and the Media

Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and the Media

Get a quick, expert overview of the increasingly important topic of technology and social media and its impact on children and adolescents. This practical resource presents a focused summary of today’s current knowledge on topics of interest to psychiatrists, pediatricians, and other health professionals working with children and adolescents. It provides current, relevant information on a wide variety of media-related topics as they relate to child and adolescent health and mental illness, making it a one-stop resource for staying up to date in this critical area.

The Deadly Percheron

A Novel

The Deadly Percheron

A classic, chilling tale of mystery and psychological horror that “will hold your attention to the last” (The New York Times). When a young, blond, handsome man walks into a psychiatrist’s office, stating that he believes he is losing his mind and asking questions about hallucinations, the doctor is prepared to help his new patient overcome his delusions. But as this twisting tale progresses, the line between what is real and unreal begins to blur—and the story becomes not only a murder mystery but a dark, unsettling voyage into memory, madness, torture, and despair.

The Deadly Dance

An Agatha Raisin Mystery

The Deadly Dance

The Deadly Dance continues the tradition in M. C. Beaton's beloved Agatha Raisin mystery series—now a hit show on Acorn TV and public television. Bossy, impulsive, and unlucky in love, the all-too-human Agatha Raisin has proved to be a surprisingly effective---and endearing---amateur sleuth. But can Agatha make it as a private investigator? After getting mugged on vacation, in what she will always think of as the Paris Incident, she decides to find out. Agatha soon learns that running her own detective agency in the Cotswolds is not quite like starring in a Raymond Chandler movie. Instead of dames in distress with big shoulder pads, her clients are ladies with missing cats and a man whose son has run off with his car. Agatha even worries that she might be outclassed by her sixty-seven-year-old secretary, Emma Comfrey. But then wealthy divorcée Catherine Laggat-Brown walks in with their first "real" case. Mrs. Laggat-Brown's daughter has received a death threat, and when Agatha thwarts an attack on the girl at a dinner dance, she recognizes an opportunity to show what Raisin Investigations can do. Even better, the case gives her a chance to reunite with her long-absent friend, Sir Charles Fraith. As they scour the Cotswolds in search of leads, Charles' insights prove invaluable and his charms irresistible, leading poor Emma to fall madly in love with him. As ever, Agatha bumbles her way through the case, trying her friends' patience and flirting shamelessly with the chief suspect. Will she put her tiny agency on the map, or has even the outrageous Agatha finally bitten off more than she can chew?