A Deed Without a Name

A Deed Without a Name

By turns hilarious and heartbreaking, A Deed Without a Name is Henry Catenacci's tale of an unlikely friendship. It's 1990, and Andrew, a shy, young, gay and painfully neurotic businessman, finds himself stuck in recession-ridden New York City with nothing but a pile of old books and a dog named Harry. City life has not been kind to Andrew, and there's not much he can do about it but suffer like everyone else -- not, that is, until he happens upon Lena, a stout Italian secretary of blunt opinions and indeterminate age with her own long list of grievances against humanity . . . and a penchant for witchcraft.

A Deed Without a Name

Unearthing the Legacy of Traditional Witchcraft

A Deed Without a Name

The field of witchcraft studies is continually over-turning new information and research about traditional witchcraft practices and their meanings. A Deed Without a Name seeks to weave together some of this cutting-edge research with insider information and practical know-how. Utilising her own decades of experience in witchcraft and core-shamanism Lee Morgan pulls together information from trial records, folklore and modern testimonials to deepen our understanding of the ecstatic and visionary substrata of Traditional Witchcraft. Those who identify themselves as 'Traditional' tend to read a lot of scholarly texts on the subject and yet still there remains a vast gulf between this information and knowledgeably applying it in practice; this book aims to close that gap.

A Deed Without a Name

The Witch in Society and History

A Deed Without a Name

Macbeth: How now, you secret, black, and midnight hags? What is't you do? Three Witches: A deed without a name. Macbeth, Act 4, Scene I What lessons can we learn from witch beliefs and witch-hunts in traditional societies and in earlier times? This fascinating cross-cultural survey of witchcraft aims to provide undergraduate students of anthropology and history with a comprehensive introduction to the figure of the witch. Case studies of witch-hunts in a broad range of societies -- from medieval Europe to America and tribal Africa -- demonstrate how those individuals who are perceived as a threat to the existing power structure are most vulnerable to being labelled a witch. The author argues that the process of 'labelling' witches has not changed and is used in western societies even today for scapegoating minorities and other groups such as people with AIDS.

Dorothy Harcourt's Secret

Sequel to "A Deed Without a Name"

Dorothy Harcourt's Secret


Unspeakable

Literature and Terrorism from the Gunpowder Plot to 9/11

Unspeakable

Unspeakable: Literature and Terrorism from the Gunpowder Plot to 9/11 explores the representation of terrorism in plays, novels, and films across the centuries. Time and time again, writers and filmmakers including William Shakespeare, Joseph Conrad, Henry James, Gillo Pontecorvo, Don DeLillo, John Updike, and Steven Spielberg refer to terrorist acts as beyond comprehension, “a deed without a name,” but they do not stop there. Instead of creating works that respond to terrorism by providing comforting narratives reassuring audiences and readers of their moral superiority and the perfidy of the terrorists, these writers and filmmakers confront the unspeakable by attempting to see the world from the terrorist’s perspective and by examining the roots of terrorist violence.

In the Beginning was the Deed

Reflections on the Passage of Faust

In the Beginning was the Deed


To Act, to Do, to Perform

Drama and the Phenomenology of Action

To Act, to Do, to Perform

To Act, To Do, To Perform takes a line from Hamlet's gravedigger as a basis for a philosophical inquiry into how action is constituted by language, materiality, and performance. Drawing on contemporary theory from the fields of drama, aesthetics, literature, and cultural studies, Alice Rayner uses dramatic texts by Shakespeare, Chekhov, and Beckett to examine problems of action. When an agent or subject appears to have trouble negotiating between the name of an act and the practice of that act, a range of difficult issues in drama - such as the troubled relationships between object and process, text and performance, structure and play - become apparent. Each chapter of this book takes on those issues through examination of various dimensions of the phenomenon of action, and each examines a possible position for an agent or subject in relation to acts and action, as that position is revealed by a grammatical structure. The active/passive position of a subject is examined in Waiting for Godot, the difference between withdrawal from action and performance is discussed in relation to Three Sisters, and the visible or "demonic" element of the material act is analyzed through Macbeth. The final chapter on Hamlet examines the interplay of all these elements as action is shown to dismantle itself in performance even as it is being repeated. These analyses demonstrate the processes by which action intersects with its own dismantling in the performative present and indicate how ideas about both subjects and their acts are limited by language that divides subject from processes. To Act, To Do, To Perform is the first inclusive study of dramatic action since Francis Fergusson's The Idea of a Theater. This challenging and insightful book uses drama to elucidate philosophical questions and simultaneously demonstrates how drama offers something of its own to questions in literary theory and philosophy. The book will interest specialists as well as anyone intrigued by the recent popularity of "performance" as a critical and cultural metaphor.

Winterreise

Plus Other Fiction, Some Theatre Pieces, and a Smattering of Poetry

Winterreise

Winterreise is a collection of stories, theatre pieces and poems most of them reflecting the authors background, experience, and gay sensibilityand ranging all the way from serious narratives to off the wall humor. However with but a few exceptions they are not autobiographical. Included among them are a few excerpts from larger works.