A Defoe Companion

CRITICISM Bell, Ian A., Defoe's Fiction (Croom Helm, London, 1985). Birdsall, Virginia Ogden, Defoe's Perpetual Seekers: A Study of the Major Fiction (Associated University Presses, London and Toronto, 1985). Boardman, Michael M., Defoe ...

A Defoe Companion

Defoe occupies a central place in the history of English literature. As the author of Robinson Crusoe and Moll Flanders he can claim to be the creator of the first novels in English, and he was one of the earliest practitioners of the 'desert island' myth which has had such an influence on the human imagination. In A Journal of the Plague Year and A Tour through the Whole Island of Great Britain he forged a distinctive documentary style which deeply influenced later writers.

The Cambridge Companion to Daniel Defoe

Daniel Defoe: Modern Critical Views. ... Defoe and Economics: The Fortunes of Roxana in the History of Interpretation, Basingstoke: Macmillan, ... Lexington: University of Kentucky Press, 1999 Hammond, J. R. A Defoe Companion.

The Cambridge Companion to Daniel Defoe

Daniel Defoe had an eventful and adventurous life as a merchant, politician, spy and literary hack. He is one of the eighteenth century's most lively, innovative and important authors, famous not only for his novels, including Robinson Crusoe, Moll Flanders, and Roxana, but for his extensive work in journalism, political polemic and conduct guides, and for his pioneering 'Tour through the Whole Island of Great Britain'. This volume surveys the wide range of Defoe's fiction and non-fiction, and assesses his importance as writer and thinker. Leading scholars discuss key issues in Defoe's novels, and show how the man who was once pilloried for his writings emerges now as a key figure in the literature and culture of the early eighteenth century.

A Defoe Companion

As the author of Robinson Crusoe and Moll Flanders he can claim to be the creator of the first novels in English, and he was one of the earliest practitioners of the 'desert island' myth which has had such an influence on the human ...

A Defoe Companion

Defoe occupies a central place in the history of English literature. As the author of Robinson Crusoe and Moll Flanders he can claim to be the creator of the first novels in English, and he was one of the earliest practitioners of the 'desert island' myth which has had such an influence on the human imagination. In A Journal of the Plague Year and A Tour through the Whole Island of Great Britain he forged a distinctive documentary style which deeply influenced later writers.

The Cambridge Companion to English Novelists

Dickens's Pickivick Papers (1836-7), as one influential reviewer put it, was 'pictured throughout with the minute reality of a Defoe'.4 By the second half of the century, Defoe's 'wonderful power in making a narrative seem real' had ...

The Cambridge Companion to English Novelists

In this Companion, leading scholars and critics address the work of the most celebrated and enduring novelists from the British Isles (excluding living writers): among them Defoe, Richardson, Sterne, Austen, Dickens, the Brontës, George Eliot, Hardy, James, Lawrence, Joyce, and Woolf. The significance of each writer in their own time is explained, the relation of their work to that of predecessors and successors explored, and their most important novels analysed. These essays do not aim to create a canon in a prescriptive way, but taken together they describe a strong developing tradition of the writing of fictional prose over the past 300 years. This volume is a helpful guide for those studying and teaching the novel, and will allow readers to consider the significance of less familiar authors such as Henry Green and Elizabeth Bowen alongside those with a more established place in literary history.

The Life of Daniel Defoe

Green, Martin. Dreams of Adventure, Deeds of Empire. London: Routledge & Kegan Paul, 1980. Green, Martin. The Robinson Crusoe Story. University Park and London: Penn State University Press, 1990. Hammond, J.R. A Defoe Companion.

The Life of Daniel Defoe

The Life of Daniel Defoe examines the entire range of Defoe’s writing in the context of what is known about his life and opinions. Features extended and detailed commentaries on Defoe’s political, religious, moral, and economic journalism, as well as on all of his narrative fictions, including Robinson Crusoe Places emphasis on Defoe’s distinctive style and rhetoric Situates his work within the precise historical circumstances of the eighteenth-century in which Defoe was an important and active participant Now available in paperback

Defoe and the Dutch

Hammond, J. R. A Defoe Companion. Basingstoke: Macmillan, 1993. Hanna, Willard A. Indonesian Banda: Colonialism and its Aftermath in the Nutmeg Islands. Bandanaira: Yayasan Warisan dan Budaya Banda Naira. 1991. Happé, Peter.

Defoe and the Dutch

The novels of Daniel Defoe are set in years during which two Anglo-Dutch wars were fought, a Dutch king took over the English throne, and the primacy of the Dutch in Northern European commerce was in the process of being overtaken by the English. At the time of these novels’ publication, the geo-physical, political and cultural achievements of the United Provinces were still remarked upon as extraordinary, while so many people had travelled between the two countries that Dutch communities in England and English communities in the United Provinces were unremarkable. Defoe’s personal, professional and political interests lay parallel and very close to stereotypically Dutch affairs, such as tolerance of dissenting Christianity, the promotion of trade as the source of a country’s wealth, and Court Whig (specifically Williamite) interests. In spite of this, the many Dutch elements in his novels are not always evident, and the body of his fiction has not previously been examined from this perspective. Defoe and the Dutch: Places, Things, People explores what English readers of seventeenth and early eighteenth century English fiction and non-fiction knew about the Dutch, what images of the Dutch they were exposed to, and what significance these images may have had. Against that background, it investigates how Dutch elements are used or referred to in nine novels attributed to Daniel Defoe. From the ubiquity of Dutch ships and the Dutch bill of exchange to the disallowing of Dutch martial heroism and the exchange of gifts in Dutch weddings, images and associations of Dutch places, things and people in Defoe’s novels are woven into the fabric of the narratives. The novels’ uses of these and many other Dutch motifs or images are shown to avoid crude or negative stereotypes, and to be complex, subtle, and sensitive to the real-life events and contexts of the fictions, while also participating in a mode of representation that is overridingly emblematic.

A study guide for Daniel Defoe s A Journal of the Plague Year

Backsheider, Paula R., Daniel Defoe: His Life, Johns Hopkins University Press, 1989, pp. 321, 84106,41236, 46792, 493528. ... Hammond, J. R. "A Journal of the Plague Year," in A Defoe Companion, Macmillan, 1993, pp. 106117.

A study guide for Daniel Defoe s  A Journal of the Plague Year

A study guide for Daniel Defoe's "A Journal of the Plague Year", excerpted from Gale's acclaimed Novels for Students series. This concise study guide includes plot summary; character analysis; author biography; study questions; historical context; suggestions for further reading; and much more. For any literature project, trust Novels for Students for all of your research needs.

The Habit of Lying

5 Michael Boardman, for example, claims that ''Defoe wrote for readers who affirmed an absolute and perhaps ... which clearly indicates that Defoe saw the story differently from his heroine''' (Hammond, A Defoe Companion [Lanham, ...

The Habit of Lying

Lying appears to be ubiquitous, what Franz Kafka called "a universal principle”; yet, despite a number of recent books on the subject, it has been given comparatively little genuinely systematic attention by philosophers, social scientists, or even literary theorists. In The Habit of Lying John Vignaux Smyth examines three forms of falsification—lying, concealment, and fiction—and makes a strong critique of traditional approaches to each of them, and, above all, to the relations among them. With recourse to Rene Girard, Paul de Man, Theodor Adorno, Leo Strauss, and other theoreticians not usually considered together, Smyth arrives at some surprising conclusions about the connections between lying, mimesis, sacrifice, sadomasochism, and the sacred, among other central subjects. Arguing that the relation between lying and truthtelling has been characterized in the West by sharply sacrificial features, he begins with a critique of the philosophies of lying espoused by Kant and Sissela Bok, then concludes that the problem of truth and lies leads to the further problem of the relation between law and arbitrariness as well as to the relation between rationality and unanimity. Constructively criticizing the work of such philosophers as Bertrand Russell, Ludwig Wittgenstein, Richard Rorty, and Nelson Goodman, Smyth shows how these problems occur comparably in fiction theory and how Paul de Man’s definition of fiction as arbitrariness finds confirmation in analytic philosophy. Through the novels of Defoe, Stendhal, and Beckett—with topics ranging from Defoe’s treatment of lies, fiction, and obscenity to Beckett’s treatment of the anus and the sacred—Smyth demonstrates how these texts generalize the issues of mendacity, concealment, and sacrificial arbitrariness in Girard’s sense to almost every aspect of experience, fiction theory, and cultural life. The final section of the book, taking its cue from Shakespeare, elaborates a sacrificial view of the history of fashion and dress concealment.

Reference Works in British and American Literature

Hammond , J. R. A Defoe Companion . Lanham , MD : Barnes & Noble , 1993 . 151p . LC 92-39387 . ISBN 0-389-21006-4 . A handbook to Defoe's life and works , containing biographical and critical surveys , dictionaries of Defoe's works and ...

Reference Works in British and American Literature

Bracken identifies and describes a substantial portion of the currently available reference sources in British and American literature with more than 1,500 resources on individual writers. Descriptive annotations offer thorough and detailed assessments of the works.

Moll Flanders

BIBLIOGRAPHY Leslie Stephen , ' De Foe's Novels ' , in Hours in a Library , First Series , Smith & Elder , London 1874 ... in the Eighteenth Century , Colleagues Press , East Lansing , MI 1988 J. R. Hammond , A Defoe Companion , Barnes &

Moll Flanders

Abandoned at birth and threatened with a life in service, Defoe's young rebel sets her heart on independence. One fatal seduction and five husbands later, she resorts to a life of self-supporting crime.

Authoring War

129 P. N. Furbank and W. R. Owens, A Critical Bibliography of Daniel Defoe (London: Pickering & Chatto, 1998), 194. 130 J. R. Hammond, A Defoe Companion (Basingstoke: Macmillan, 1993), 80. 131 John Mullan, 'Introduction', ...

Authoring War

Kate McLoughlin's Authoring War is an ambitious and pioneering study of war writing across all literary genres from earliest times to the present day. Examining a range of cultures, she brings wide reading and close rhetorical analysis to illuminate how writers have met the challenge of representing violence, chaos and loss. War gives rise to problems of epistemology, scale, space, time, language and logic. She emphasises the importance of form to an understanding of war literature and establishes connections across periods and cultures from Homer to the 'War on Terror'. Exciting new critical groupings arise in consequence, as Byron's Don Juan is read alongside Heller's Catch-22 and English Civil War poetry alongside Second World War letters. Innovative in its approach and inventive in its encyclopedic range, Authoring War will be indispensable to any discussion of war representation.

Robinson Crusoe

SELECT BIBLIOGRAPHY Bibliographies and Reference J. R. Hammond , A Defoe Companion , Macmillan , Basingstoke 1993 Henry Clinton Hutchins , Robinson Crusoe and Its Printing , 1719- 1731 , Columbia University Press , New York 1925 ...

Robinson Crusoe

The adventures of Robinson Crusoe who was marooned on a desert island for twenty years.

A Journal of the Plague Year

HAMMOND , J.R. A Defoe Companion . Lanham , MD : Roman & Littlefield , 1993 . LOCKE , JOHN . Second Treatise of Government . New York : Dover Publications , Inc. , 2002 . LUND , ROGER D. Critical Essays on Daniel Defoe .

A Journal of the Plague Year

Being observations or memorials of the most remarkable occurrences as well public as private which happened in london during the last great visitation in 1665. written by a citizen who continuedall the while in london. never made public before...

Gale Researcher Guide for Daniel Defoe s Picaresque From the News to the Novel

Defoe's works help establish the modern idea of the self and an image of the relations and antagonisms between selfhood and society that remains the dominant ... In The Cambridge Companion to Daniel Defoe, edited by John Richetti, ...

Gale Researcher Guide for  Daniel Defoe s Picaresque  From the News to the Novel

Gale Researcher Guide for: Daniel Defoe's Picaresque: From the News to the Novel is selected from Gale's academic platform Gale Researcher. These study guides provide peer-reviewed articles that allow students early success in finding scholarly materials and to gain the confidence and vocabulary needed to pursue deeper research.

Christian Encounters with the Other

Hammond, J. R. A Defoe Companion. Lanham, MD: Barnes and Noble, 1993. Heims, Neil. “Robinson Crusoe and the Fear of Being Eaten.” Colby Library Quarterly 19 (1983): 190–93. Jager, Eric. “The Parrot's Voice: Language and the Self in ...

Christian Encounters with the Other

Why does Christianity feel the need to impose its customs and beliefs on the rest of the world? Using a cultural studies approach, CHRISTIAN ENCOUNTERS WITH THE OTHER covers the Renaissance through to the present. It spans much of the globe, discussing a range of authors and their works and the social forces that help shape missionary movements.

Historicizing Christian Encounters with the Other

Hammond, J. R. A Defoe Companion. Lanham, MD: Barnes and Noble, 1993. Heims, Neil. “Robinson Crusoe and the Fear of Being Eaten.” Colby Library Quarterly 19 (1983): 190–93. Jager, Eric. “The Parrot's Voice: Language and the Self in ...

Historicizing Christian Encounters with the Other

Written from a cultural studies point of view, thirteen original essays analyse literary accounts of historically famous sites of conversion. Beginning with the Renaissance and extending to the present, authors under discussion include: Beaumont and Fletcher, Lope de Vega, Guamam Poma, Thomas Nashe, Daniel Defoe, Chateaubriand, Salvation Army pamphleteers, Chinese missionaries, Stephen Riggs, Samson Occom, Shusaku Endo, Mongo Beti, and Rigoberta Menchu. What were the missionaries' intentions, and how were they perceived?

The Cambridge Companion to Daniel Defoe

A survey of Defoe's career and writings aimed at students, with readings of his major works.

The Cambridge Companion to Daniel Defoe

A survey of Defoe's career and writings aimed at students, with readings of his major works.

Youth s Companion

WKOX 564 HEX WRM THE COMPANION XBOX FOR ALL THE FAMILY XLX HLOH October 23 , 1913 weet KB ROBINSON CRUSOE 2 Robinson Crusoe . By Daniel Defoe . Given to Companion subscribers only for one new subscription and 15 cents extra .

Youth s Companion


The Postcolonial Enlightenment

For references to Friday as a black, see e.g. Martin Green, The Robinson Crusoe Story (University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 1990), 23; J. R. Hammond, A Defoe Companion (Lanham, Md.: Barnes & Noble, 1993), 49; Colley, ...

The Postcolonial Enlightenment

Over the last thirty years, postcolonial critiques of European imperial practices have transformed our understanding of colonial ideology, resistance, and cultural contact. The Enlightenment has played a complex but often unacknowledged role in this discussion, alternately reviled and venerated as the harbinger of colonial dominion and avatar of liberation, as target and shield, as shadow and light. This volume brings together two arenas - eighteenth-century studies and postcolonial theory - in order to interrogate the role and reputation of Enlightenment in the context of early European colonial ambitions and postcolonial interrogations of Western imperial aspirations. With essays by leading scholars in the field, Postcolonial Enlightenment address issues central not only to literature and philosophy but also to natural history, religion, law, and the emerging sciences of man. The contributors situate a range of writers - from Hobbes and Herder, Behn and Burke, to Defoe and Diderot - in relation both to eighteenth-century colonial practices and to key concepts within current postcolonial theory concerning race, globalization, human rights, sovereignty, and national and personal identity. By enlarging the temporal and geographic framework through which we read, the essays in this volume open up alternate genealogies for categories, events and ideas central to the emergence of global modernity.