A Handbook of the Troubadours

Introduction F. R. P. Akehurst The troubadours have been called “ the inventors of modern verse , ” ' l and they stand ... This book is intended to be a reference book and a digest of the material known to every troubadour specialist .

A Handbook of the Troubadours

This book is a reference volume and a digest of more than a century of scholarly work on troubadour poetry. Written by leading scholars, it summarizes the current consensus on the various facets of troubadour studies. Standing at the beginning of the history of modern European verse, the troubadours were the prime poets and composers of the twelfth and thirteenth centuries in the South of France. No study of medieval literature is complete without an examination of the courtly love which is celebrated in the elaborately rhymed stanzas of troubadour verse, creations whose words and melodies were imitated by poets and musicians all over medieval Europe. The words of about 2,500 troubadour songs have survived, along with 250 melodies, and all have come under intense scholarly scrutiny. This Handbook brings together the fruits of this scrutiny, giving teachers and students an overview of the fundamental issues in troubadour scholarship. All quotations are given in the original Old Occitan and in English. The editors provide a list of troubadour editions and an index, and each chapter includes a list of additional readings.

Handbook of Medieval Studies

sation des structures interstrophiques dans la poésie lyrique destroubadours et destrouvères, 1989; Michel-André Bossy, “The trobar clus of Raimbau d'Aurenga, Giraut de Bornelh, and Arnaut Daniel,” Medievalia 19 [1996]: 203–19; ...

Handbook of Medieval Studies

This interdisciplinary handbook provides extensive information about research in medieval studies and its most important results over the last decades. The handbook is a reference work which enables the readers to quickly and purposely gain insight into the important research discussions and to inform themselves about the current status of research in the field. The handbook consists of four parts. The first, large section offers articles on all of the main disciplines and discussions of the field. The second section presents articles on the key concepts of modern medieval studies and the debates therein. The third section is a lexicon of the most important text genres of the Middle Ages. The fourth section provides an international bio-bibliographical lexicon of the most prominent medievalists in all disciplines. A comprehensive bibliography rounds off the compendium. The result is a reference work which exhaustively documents the current status of research in medieval studies and brings the disciplines and experts of the field together.

The Oxford Handbook of Music and Medievalism

and a book about the troubadours. He moved in Pre-Raphaelite social circles: His wife, Catherine Madox Brown, was an artist and model, the daughter of Ford Madox Brown, and their son was the novelist Ford Madox Ford, whose lifelong love ...

The Oxford Handbook of Music and Medievalism

The Oxford Handbook of Music and Medievalism provides a snapshot of the diverse ways in which medievalism--the retrospective immersion in the images, sounds, narratives, and ideologies of the European Middle Ages--powerfully transforms many of the varied musical traditions of the last two centuries. Thirty-three chapters from an international group of scholars explore topics ranging from the representation of the Middle Ages in nineteenth-century opera to medievalism in contemporary video game music, thereby connecting disparate musical forms across typical musicological boundaries of chronology and geography. While some chapters focus on key medievalist works such as Orff's Carmina Burana or Peter Jackson's Lord of the Rings films, others explore medievalism in the oeuvre of a single composer (e.g. Richard Wagner or Arvo Pärt) or musical group (e.g. Led Zeppelin). The topics of the individual chapters include both well-known works such as John Boorman's film Excalibur and also less familiar examples such as Eduard Lalo's Le Roi d'Ys. The authors of the chapters approach their material from a wide array of disciplinary perspectives, including historical musicology, popular music studies, music theory, and film studies, examining the intersections of medievalism with nationalism, romanticism, ideology, nature, feminism, or spiritualism. Taken together, the contents of the Handbook develop new critical insights that venture outside traditional methodological constraints and provide a capstone and point of departure for future scholarship on music and medievalism.

The Songs of Peire Vidal

Gerald Bond discusses the influence of the round dance and Romance vernacular songs in the chapter entitled “ Origins ” in A Handbook of the Troubadours , eds . F.R.P. Akehurst and Judith M. Davis ( Berkeley : U of California Press ...

The Songs of Peire Vidal

Peire Vidal, one of the most celebrated of the Occitan troubadours, was a favorite performer at the courts of France, Spain, Italy, Malta, and Palestine during the late twelfth and early thirteenth centuries. His witty and humorous love-songs and satires provide a fascinating insight into the courtly society of his times. This book includes the first English translation and commentary of the complete works of Peire Vidal. It is a useful and accessible text for students and specialists of medieval literature.

Lark in the Morning

“The Trobairitz.” In Gaunt and Kay,Troubadours. Schulze-Busacker, Elisabeth. “Topoi.” In Akehurst and Davis,Handbook of the Troubadours. Seward, Desmond.The Monks of War: The Military Religious Orders. 1972; London: Penguin Books, 1995.

Lark in the Morning

Robert Kehew augments his own verse translations with those of Pound & Snodgrass, to provide a collection that captures both the poetic pyrotechnics of the original verse & the astonishing variety of troubadour voices.

A New Handbook of Literary Terms

See A Handbook of the Troubadours ( ), ed. F. R. P. Akehurst and Judith Davis. See also . fin de siècle French (pronounced FAHN deh seeAYKleh): “end of the century.” A term applied to the literature and art ...

A New Handbook of Literary Terms

A New Handbook of Literary Terms offers a lively, informative guide to words and concepts that every student of literature needs to know. Mikics’s definitions are essayistic, witty, learned, and always a pleasure to read. They sketch the derivation and history of each term, including especially lucid explanations of verse forms and providing a firm sense of literary periods and movements from classicism to postmodernism. The Handbook also supplies a helpful map to the intricate and at times confusing terrain of literary theory at the beginning of the twenty-first century: the author has designated a series of terms, from New Criticism to queer theory, that serves as a concise but thorough introduction to recent developments in literary study. Mikics’s Handbook is ideal for classroom use at all levels, from freshman to graduate. Instructors can assign individual entries, many of which are well-shaped essays in their own right. Useful bibliographical suggestions are given at the end of most entries. The Handbook’s enjoyable style and thoughtful perspective will encourage students to browse and learn more. Every reader of literature will want to own this compact, delightfully written guide.

The Legacy of Courtly Literature

Akehurst and Davis, eds. Handbook of the Troubadours. (University of California 1995) and Gaunt and Kay, eds. The Troubadours: An Introduction (Cambridge University Press, 1999). 5. The Allegory of Love (Oxford University Press, 1958), ...

The Legacy of Courtly Literature

This fascinating volume examines the enduring influence of courtly tradition and courtly love, particularly in contemporary popular culture. The ten chapters explore topics including the impact of the medieval troubadour in modern love songs, the legacy of figures such as Tristan, Iseult, Lancelot, Guinevere, and Merlin in modern film and literature, and more generally, how courtly and chivalric conceptions of love have shaped the Western world’s conception of love, loyalty, honor, and adultery throughout history and to this day.

Where Troubadours Were Bishops

90–111 . Cambridge , 1984 . . “ Manuscripts . " Chap . 15 of A Handbook of the Troubadours , edited by F. R. P. Akehurst and Judith M. Davis , pp . 307–33 . Berkeley , 1995 . " The Troubadours and the Albigensian Crusade : A Long View .

Where Troubadours Were Bishops

Using one man as a lens, a man known variously as Folquet, Folques, Folco, and Folc, it will examine some of the important changes and developments of the period from a new, more human, perspective.

Troubadour Poems from the South of France

Troubadours and Medieval Lyric Poetry Akehurst , F. R. P. , and Judith M. Davis , eds . A Handbook of the Troubadours . Berkeley : University of California Press , 1995. Contributions on major aspects of the subject , including non ...

Troubadour Poems from the South of France

The poetry of the troubadours was famous throughout the middle ages, but the difficulty and diversity of the original languages have been obstacles to its appreciation by a wider audience. This collection aims to redress the situation, presenting English verse translations in contemporary idiom and a highly readable form. It includes some 125 poems, with a strong representation of those composed by women, and goes beyond traditional limits in time to feature a sampling of the earliest texts in the Occitan language, written in the tenth and eleventh centuries, and later works from the early fourteenth. Though most poems translated in the book were written in Occitan, the vernacular of southern France, there are also a few translations of poems written in the same place and time but in other languages, including Latin, Hebrew, Norse, Catalan, and Italian. Genres include love songs, satires, invectives, pastourelles, debates, laments, and religious songs. A comprehensive introduction places the troubadours in their historical context and traces the development of their art; headnotes introduce each poet, and the book ends with a bibliography and suggestions for further reading. WILLIAM D. PADEN is a Professor of French and Italian at Northwestern University, and was recently named a Chevalier dans l'Ordre des Palmes Acad130>miques. FRANCES FREEMAN PADEN is a Distinguished Senior Lecturer in The Writing Program and Gender Studies, also at Northwestern University.

Mapping Medieval Identities in Occitanian Crusade Song

Like Aquitanian versus, troubadour song could act as a kind of resistance, based partly on its interaction with the ... Troubadour. 83 Gerald A. Bond, “Origins,” in A Handbook of the Troubadours, ed. F. R. P. Akehurst and Judith M.

Mapping Medieval Identities in Occitanian Crusade Song

In medieval Occitania (southern France), troubadours and monastic creators fostered a vibrant musical culture. In response to the early Crusade campaigns of the twelfth and thirteenth centuries, Christians of the region turned to producing monophonic, poetic song, encompassing both secular and sacred genres. These works assert shifting regional identities and worldviews, exploring devotional practices and religious beliefs, overlaid with notions of contemporaneous geopolitics and secular, intellectual interests. Mapping Medieval Identities in Occitanian Crusade Song demonstrates the profound impact the Crusades had on two seemingly discrete musical-poetic practices: the Latin, sacred Aquitanian versus, associated with Christian devotion, and the vernacular troubadour lyric, associated with courtly love. Rachel May Golden investigates how such Crusade songs distinctively arose out of their geographic environment, uncovering intersections between the beginning of Holy War and the emergence of new styles of poetic-musical composition. She brings together sacred and secular genres of the region to reveal the inventiveness of new composition and the imaginative scope of the Crusades within medieval culture. These songs reflect both the outer world and interior lives, and often their conjunction, giving shape and expression to concerns with the Occitanian homeland, spatial aspects of the Crusades, and newly emerging positions within socio-political history. Drawing on approaches from cultural geography, literary studies, and musicology, Mapping Medieval Identities in Occitanian Crusade Song provides a timely perspective on geopolitical and cultural interactions between nations.

Dante s Lyric Redemption

Indeed, there was a powerful association between troubadour song and the experience of love. ... overview of the tradition's cultural roots, see G. A. Bond, 'Origins', in Akehurst and Davis, eds, A Handbook of the Troubadours, pp.

Dante s Lyric Redemption

Dante's Lyric Redemption offers a re-examination of two strongly interrelated aspects of the poet's work: the role and value he ascribes to earthly love and his relationship to the Romance lyric tradition of his time. It argues that an account of Dante's poetic journey that posits a stark division between earthly and divine love, and between the secular lyric poet and the Christian auctor, does little justice to his highly distinctive and often polemical handling of these categories. The book firstly contextualizes, traces, and accounts for Dante's intriguing commitment to love poetry, from the 'minor works' to the Commedia. It highlights his attempts, especially in his masterpiece, to overcome normative oppositions in formulating a uniquely redemptive vernacular poetics, one oriented towards the eternal while rooted in his affective, and indeed erotic, past. It then examines how this matter is at stake in Dante's treatment of three important lyric predecessors: Guittone d'Arezzo, Arnaut Daniel, and Folco of Marseilles. Through a detailed reading of Dante's engagement with these poets, the book illuminates his careful departure from a dualistic model of love and conversion and shows his erotic commitment to be at the heart of his claims to pre-eminence as a vernacular author.

Sound Score

In A Handbook of the Troubadours, edited by F. R. P. Akehurst and Judith M. Davis. London: University of California Press, Ltd. Chapman, James. 1818. The Music, orMelody and Rhythmus ofLanguage. Edinburgh: Macredi, Skelly, and Co.

Sound   Score

Sound and Score brings together music expertise from prominent international researchers and performers to explore the intimate relations between sound and score and the artistic possibilities that this relationship yields for performers, composers and listeners. Considering "notation" as the totality of words, signs, and symbols encountered on the road to an accurate and effective performance of music, this book embraces different styles and periods in a comprehensive understanding of the complex relations between invisible sound and mute notation, between aural perception and visual representation, and between the concreteness of sound and the iconic essence of notation. Three main perspectives structure the analysis: a conceptual approach that offers contributions from different fields of enquiry (history, musicology, semiotics), a practical one that takes the skilled body as its point of departure (written by performers), and finally an experimental perspective that challenges state-of-the-art practices, including transdisciplinary approaches in the crossroads to visual arts and dance.

When Saint Francis Saved the Church

How a Converted Medieval Troubadour Created a Spiritual Vision for the Ages Jon M. Sweeney. 6. Hans-Erich Keller, “Italian Troubadours,” in A Handbook of the Troubadours, ed. F. R. P. Akehurst and Judith M. Davis (Berkeley: University ...

When Saint Francis Saved the Church

When Saint Francis Saved the Church offers a surprising new look at the world’s most popular saint, showing how this beloved, but often-mythologized character created a spiritual vision for the ages and may very well have rescued the Christian faith. In When Saint Francis Saved the Church (paperback), popular historian Jon Sweeney presents an intriguing portrait of Francis beyond the readily familiar stories and images. In the tradition of Thomas Cahill’s How the Irish Saved Civilization, Sweeney reveals how the saint became a hinge in the history of the Christian faith and shows how in just fourteen years—from 1205 to 1219—the unconventional and stumbling wisdom of a converted troubadour changed the Church. Sweeney outlines Francis’s revolutionary approach to friendship, “the other” (people at the margins), poverty, spirituality, care (for people, creatures, and the natural world), and death. This vibrant book presents the unsullied life and message of Francis in its essential details, offering a sweeping, informative, remarkable look at how Francis and his movement quite literally saved the Christian faith—and continues to offer a spiritual vision with contemporary relevance.

Female Voice Song and Women s Musical Agency in the Middle Ages

In A Handbook of the Troubadours, edited by F. R. P. Akehurst and Judith M. Davis, pp. 185–97. Berkeley, 1995. Pollina, Vincent. “Melodic Continuity and Discontinuity in A Chantar m'er of the Comtessa de Dia.” In Miscellanea Di Studi ...

Female Voice Song and Women   s Musical Agency in the Middle Ages

This collection presents fresh evidence and new perspectives on the diverse ways in which women created and interacted with cultures of song between c. 600 and c. 1500.

The Cathars and the Albigensian Crusade

The best introductions in English to troubadour poetry remain A Handbook of the Troubadours, eds F. R. P. Akehurst and J. M. Davis (Berkeley, London: University of California Press, 1995), and An Introduction ...

The Cathars and the Albigensian Crusade

The Cathars and the Albigensian Crusade brings together a rich and diverse range of medieval sources to examine key aspects of the growth of heresy and dissent in southern France in the twelfth and thirteenth centuries and the Church’s response to that threat through the subsequent authorisation of the Albigensian crusade. Aimed at students and scholars alike, the documents it discusses – papal letters, troubadour songs, contemporary chronicles in Latin and the vernacular, and inquisitorial documents – reflect a deeper perception of medieval heresy and the social, political and religious implications of crusading than has hitherto been possible. The reader is introduced to themes which are crucial to our understanding of the medieval world: ideologies of crusading and holy war, the complex nature of Catharism, the Church’s implementation of diverse strategies to counter heresy, the growth of papal inquisition, southern French counter-strategies of resistance and rebellion, and the uses of Latin and the vernacular to express regional and cultural identity. This timely and highly original collection not only brings together previously unexplored and in some cases unedited material, but provides a nuanced and multi-layered view of the religious, social and political dimensions of one of the most infamous conflicts of the High Middle Ages. This book is a valuable resource for all students, teachers and researchers of medieval history and the crusades.

Zutot 2001

The popular distinction today between the 'aristocratic troubadour' and the 'lowly jongleur' isnot supported bythe sources,which —atleast in ... R.P. Akehurst and J.M. Davis, eds,A Handbook of the Troubadours, Berkeley 1995, 121–164.

Zutot 2001

The 2001 yearbook aims to fill a gap that has become more and more conspicuous among the wealth of scholarly periodicals in the field of Jewish Studies. It covers Jewish Culture in its broadest sense, i.e. encompassing various academic disciplines - literature, languages and linguistics, philosophy, art, sociology, politics and history - and reflects binary oppositions such as religious and secular, high and low, written and oral, male and female culture.

Middle Ages

For more on William DK, known as the first troubadour, and his poetry, see The Poetry of William VII, ... For an introduction to this fascinating genre, see Elizabeth W. Poe, The Vidas and Razos, in A Handbook of the Troubadours, ed.

Middle Ages

The Oxford History of Life-Writing: Volume 1: The Middle Ages explores the richness and variety of life-writing from late Antiquity to the threshold of the Renaissance. During the Middle Ages, writers from Bede to Chaucer were thinking about life and experimenting with ways to translate lives, their own and others', into literature. Their subjects included career religious, saints, celebrities, visionaries, pilgrims, princes, philosophers, poets, and even a few 'ordinary people.' They relay life stories not only in chronological narratives, but also in debates, dialogues, visions, and letters. Many medieval biographers relied on the reader's trust in their authority, but some espoused standards of evidence that seem distinctly modern, drawing on reliable written sources, interviewing eyewitnesses, and cross-checking their facts wherever possible. Others still professed allegiance to evidence but nonetheless freely embellished and invented not only events and dialogue but the sources to support them. The first book devoted to life-writing in medieval England, The Oxford History of Life-Writing: Volume 1: The Middle Ages covers major life stories in Old and Middle English, Latin, and French, along with such Continental classics as the letters of Abelard and Heloise and the autobiographical Vision of Christine de Pizan. In addition to the life stories of historical figures, it treats accounts of fictional heroes, from Beowulf to King Arthur to Queen Katherine of Alexandria, which show medieval authors experimenting with, adapting, and expanding the conventions of life writing. Though Medieval life writings can be challenging to read, we encounter in them the antecedents of many of our own diverse biographical forms-tabloid lives, literary lives, brief lives, revisionist lives; lives of political figures, memoirs, fictional lives, and psychologically-oriented accounts that register the inner lives of their subjects.

The Shadow of Dante in French Renaissance Lyric

The Occitan troubadours made significant contributions to European literary conceptions of love. ... On the development of fin'amor, see Moshe Lazar, “Fin'amor,” in A Handbook of the Troubadours, (1995), 61–100. 35 Sarah Kay, “Courts, ...

The Shadow of Dante in French Renaissance Lyric

This book presents an interpretation of Maurice Scève’s lyric sequence Délie, object de plus haulte vertu (Lyon, 1544) in literary relation to the Vita nuova, Commedia, and other works of Dante Alighieri. Dante’s subtle influence on Scève is elucidated in depth for the first time, augmenting the allusions in Délie to the Canzoniere of Petrarch (Francesco Petrarca). Scève’s sequence of dense, epigrammatic dizains is considered to be an early example, prior to the Pléiade poets, of French Renaissance imitation of Petrarch’s vernacular poetry, in a time when imitatio was an established literary practice, signifying the poet’s participation in a tradition. While the Canzoniere is an important source for Scève’s Délie, both works are part of a poetic lineage that includes Occitan troubadours, Guinizzelli, Cavalcanti, and Dante. The book situates Dante as a relevant predecessor and source for Scève, and examines anew the Petrarchan label for Délie. Compelling poetic affinities emerge between Dante and Scève that do not correlate with Petrarch.

From Arabye to Engelond

A Handbook of the Troubadours . Berkeley : U of California P , 1995 . Alin , José María , ed . Cancionero tradicional . Madrid : Castalia , 1991 . Ashley , Kathleen . “ Voice and Audience : The Emotional World of the cantigas de amigo .

From Arabye to Engelond

This collection of essays explores the dialogue between Arabic and European cultures during the medieval period starting from the year 700. Using critical approaches the contributors examine a variety of thematic and cultural concerns.

The English Lyric Tradition

Elizabeth W. Poe, “The Vidas and Razos,” in A Handbook of the Troubadours, ed. F. R. P. Akehurst and Judith M. Davis (Berkeley: University of California Press, 1995), 185–97; Simon Gaunt and John Marshall, “Occitan Grammars and the Art ...

The English Lyric Tradition

 Modern readers can sometimes be unsure about the language and the literary conventions of medieval and Renaissance verse—lyrical works written at a time before poetry was assumed to be about personal expression. This readers’ guide introduces to a 21st century audience some of the greatest masterpieces of English poetry spanning five centuries. Focusing on poems by Chaucer, Wyatt, Shakespeare, Milton and others, the author discusses the development of poetic technique, explains the rhetorical culture of earlier centuries and describes the various lyric forms—including lover’s complaints, sonnets and elegies—that poets used to communicate with readers.