The Magic of Indian Cricket

... Lord Gordon 34 Higgs, Jack 175 Hinduism 2; reforms 10 Hindus 1–2, 14–15, 75; Dharma Yuddha 224–5; views on Muslims 203–4, 216–18 historical apologies 6 History of India (Mill) 35 History of Indian Cricket (Bose) 138, 179 A History ...

The Magic of Indian Cricket

In the last twenty years, Indian cricket has been transformed. With the arrival of global television networks, mass-media coverage and multinational sponsors, cricket has become big business and India has become the economic driving force in the world game. For the first time a developing country has become a major player in the international sports arena. This fully updated and revised edition of Mihir Bose's classic history is a unique account of the Indian cricket phenomenon. Drawing on a combination of extensive research and personal experience, Bose traces the development of the Indian game from its beginnings as a colonial pastime to its coming of age as a national passion and now a global commercial powerhouse. This illuminating study reveals Indian cricket's central place in modern India’s identity, culture and society. Insightful, honest and challenging, Bose tackles the myths and controversies of Indian cricket. He considers the game in terms of race, caste, politics, national consciousness and ambition, money, celebrity and the media, evoking all the unpredictability, frustration and glory that is the magic of Indian cricket.

Lost Histories of Indian Cricket

For detailed descriptions on how the players had been alienated from Nayudu, see, Bose, History of Indian Cricket, pp. 78–79. 31. The building of the Feroz Shah Kotla stadium in Delhi was due largely to the donation of Rs. 500,000 by ...

Lost Histories of Indian Cricket

Lost Histories of Indian Cricket studies the personalities and controversies that have shaped Indian cricket over the years and brings to life the intensity surrounding India's national game. It may be true that that cricket today arouses more passions in India than in any other cricket playing country in the world. Yet, when it comes to writing on the history of the game, Indians have been reticent and much of the past has been obscured and lost. Majumdar here recovers this history and restores it to its rightful place in India's rich sporting heritage.

The 1935 Australian Cricket Tour of India

Despite a proliferation of Indian cricket research, especially in recent history, the absence of the 1935/36 tour from the literary canon is notable. This observation of omission confirms the elitist and racially exclusive reputation of ...

The 1935 Australian Cricket Tour of India

The first Australian cricket tour to India possesses an inherent intrigue that, for inexplicable reasons, has fallen into obscurity. Megan Ponsford rectifies this through her investigation of the uneasy relationships between Australia, British India and Indian nationalism during the interwar period, using the 1935/36 tour as a case study. The unique liaison between the entrepreneurial tour manager Frank Tarrant and the Maharaja of Patiala, who financed the exercise, led the way. From the palaces of the Raj to the foothills of the Himalayas, the evolving racial consciousness of the ragtag team of Australia cricketers defines the tour. The cricket establishment was also challenged as the tour defied the amateur game with participation encouraged by the Maharaja’s deep pockets. Employing a unique methodology, this book interprets the material culture located in the archives of the Australian and Indian cricketers. In the absence of first-hand accounts, these artefacts enable insight into the forgotten and overlooked sportspeople who are finally given the voice and acknowledgement they deserve. It is a brilliant new contribution to the study of both cricket and history, and will be a great resource for academics, researchers, and advanced students of History, Politics, Sports, Sociology, and Cultural Studies. The chapters in this book were originally published as a special issue of Sport in Society.

The Oxford Handbook of Sports History

The book's genesis was my doctoral dissertation on the social history of Indian cricket at Oxford University conducted in the years 1999 to 2003. It was published by PenguinViking in 2004 under the title Twenty- Two Yards to Freedom: A ...

The Oxford Handbook of Sports History

Practiced and watched by billions, sport is a global phenomenon. Sport history is a burgeoning sub-field that explores sport in all forms to help answer fundamental questions that scholars examine. This volume provides a reference for sport scholars and an accessible introduction to those who are new to the sub-field.

Cricket Literature and Culture

In a history of Indian cricket published in 1929, Wahiuddin Begg wrote that 'while the Governor of Bombay [...] he [Harris] took special pains to improve Indian Cricket and did a lot to invigorate interest of the game among all classes ...

Cricket  Literature and Culture

In his important contribution to the growing field of sports literature, Anthony Bateman traces the relationship between literary representations of cricket and Anglo-British national identity from 1850 to the mid 1980s. Examining newspaper accounts, instructional books, fiction, poetry, and the work of editors, anthologists, and historians, Bateman elaborates the ways in which a long tradition of literary discourse produced cricket's cultural status and meaning. His critique of writing about cricket leads to the rediscovery of little-known texts and the reinterpretation of well-known works by authors as diverse as Neville Cardus, James Joyce, the Great War poets, and C.L.R. James. Beginning with mid-eighteenth century accounts of cricket that provide essential background, Bateman examines the literary evolution of cricket writing against the backdrop of key historical moments such as the Great War, the 1926 General Strike, and the rise of Communism. Several case studies show that cricket simultaneously asserted English ideals and created anxiety about imperialism, while cricket's distinctively colonial aesthetic is highlighted through Bateman's examination of the discourse surrounding colonial cricket tours and cricketers like Prince Kumar Shri Ranjitsinhji of India and Sir Learie Constantine of Trinidad. Featuring an extensive bibliography, Bateman's book shows that, while the discourse surrounding cricket was key to its status as a symbol of nation and empire, the embodied practice of the sport served to destabilise its established cultural meaning in the colonial and postcolonial contexts.

Indian Cricket Why Good Will Never be Great

Author's take In history, time periods are bifurcated as B.C & A.D. In Indian cricket, it is B.D and A.D i.e. Before Dada and After Dada! That's how significant Sourav Chandi Ganguly is in the history of Indian Cricket or should I say ...

Indian Cricket   Why Good Will Never be Great

In India, cricket is a religion and cricketers are Gods. This book is a pure celebration of India's cricket history and the players who took Indian cricket to great heights. Yet unlike other books that are one-dimensional, this book also looks at the flip side and asks the ‘why’ questions that are seldom asked in India. The book offers great insights into why India has never managed to reach the peaks that the great Australian and West Indian teams of the past did. More importantly, it offers great suggestions to make Indian cricket truly great.

Indian Cricket Controversies

In the category of Manjrekar, Lala Amarnath and Vinoo Mankad, he was, at that juncture in the history of Indian cricket, a cricketer par excellence, a celebrity. Despite being a Muslim, insulted and abused by a predominantly Hindu crowd ...

Indian Cricket Controversies

-

Cricket in Colonial India 1780 1947

Indian cricket was thus a fiercely contested domain, much of the competition arising beyond the sporting field — a ... Docker, History of Indian Cricket; Cashman, Patrons, Players and the Crowd; Mario Rodrigues, The Statesman, 1 Nov.

Cricket in Colonial India 1780     1947

This is an exacting social history of Indian cricket between 1780 and 1947. It considers cricket as a derivative sport, creatively adapted to suit modern Indian socio-cultural needs, fulfil political imperatives and satisfy economic aspirations. Majumdar argues that cricket was a means to cross class barriers and had a healthy following even outside the aristocracy and upper middle classes well over a century ago. Indeed, in some ways, the democratization of the sport anticipated the democratization of the Indian polity itself. Boria Majumdar reveals the appropriation, assimilation and subversion of cricketing ideals in colonial and post-colonial India for nationalist ends. He exposes a sport rooted in the contingencies of the colonial and post-colonial context of nineteenth- and twentieth-century India. Cricket, to put it simply, is much more than a ‘game’ for Indians. This study describes how the genealogy of their intense engagement with cricket stretches back over a century. It is concerned not only with the game but also with the end of cricket as a mere sport, with Indian cricket’s commercial revolution in the 1930s, with ideals and idealism and their relative unimportance, with the decline of morality for reasons of realpolitik, and with the denunciation, once and for all, of the view that sport and politics do not mix. This book was previously published as a special issue of the International Journal of the History of Sport

Cricket Country

Bandyopadhyay, Kausik, 1911 in Retrospect: A Revisionist Perspective on a Famous Indian Sporting Victory', International Journal of the History of Sport, 21: 3–4 (June–September 2004): 363–83. Bateman, Anthony, Cricket, Literature and ...

Cricket Country

Cricket is an Indian game accidentally invented by the English, it has famously been said. Today, the Indian cricket team is a powerful national symbol, a unifying force in a country riven by conflicts. But India was represented by a cricket team long before it became an independent nation. Drawing on an unparalleled range of original archival sources, Cricket Country is the story of the first All India cricket tour of Great Britain and Ireland. It is also the extraordinary tale of how the idea of India took shape on the cricket field in the high noon of empire. Conceived by an unlikely coalition of colonial and local elites, it took twelve years and three failed attempts before an Indian cricket team made its debut on the playing fields of imperial Britain. This historic tour, which took place against the backdrop of revolutionary politics in the Edwardian era, featured an improbable cast of characters. The teams young captain was the newly enthroned ruler of a powerful Sikh state. The other cricketers were chosen on the basis of their religious identity. Remarkably, for the day, two of the players were Dalits. Over the course of the blazing Coronation summer of 1911, these Indians participated in a collective enterprise that epitomizes the way in which sport and above all cricket helped fashion the imagined communities of both empire and nation.

Routledge Companion to Sports History

2 Kausik Bandyopadhyay, 'Sports History in India: Prospects and Problems', International Journal of the History of Sport ... 4 I refer to the works of: Edward Docker, History of Indian Cricket (Delhi: Macmillan, 1977); Richard Cashman, ...

Routledge Companion to Sports History

The field of sports history is no longer a fledgling area of study. There is a great vitality in the field and it has matured dramatically over the past decade. Reflecting changes to traditional approaches, sport historians need now to engage with contemporary debates about history, to be encouraged to position themselves and their methodologies in relation to current epistemological issues, and to promote the importance of reflecting on the literary or poetic dimensions of producing history. These contemporary developments, along with a wealth of international research from a range of theoretical perspectives, provide the backdrop to the new Routledge Companion to Sports History. This book provides a comprehensive guide to the international field of sports history as it has developed as an academic area of study. Readers are guided through the development of the field across a range of thematic and geographical contexts and are introduced to the latest cutting edge approaches within the field. Including contributions from many of the world’s leading sports historians, the Routledge Companion to Sports History is the most important single volume for researchers and students in, and entering, the sports history field. It is an essential guide to contemporary research themes, to new ways of doing sports history, and to the theoretical and methodological foundations of this most fascinating of subjects.

Cricket and National Identity in the Postcolonial Age

It chose to recreate Indian cricket's folklore instead, depicting a bunch of barefoot villagers – not a group of educated merchants – as India's country's first home-grown cricket heroes. When the Denness affair boiled over in South ...

Cricket and National Identity in the Postcolonial Age

Bringing together leading international writers on cricket and society, this important new book places cricket in the postcolonial life of the major Test-playing countries. Exploring the culture, politics, governance and economics of cricket in the twenty-first century, this book dispels the age-old idea of a gentle game played on England's village greens. This is an original political and historical study of the game's development in a range of countries and covers: * cricket in the new Commonwealth: Sri Lanka, Pakistan, the Caribbean and India * the cricket cultures of Australia, New Zealand and post-apartheid South Africa * cricket in England since the 1950s. This new book is ideal for students of sport, politics, history and postcolonialism as it provides stimulating and comprehensive discussions of the major issues including race, migration, gobalization, neoliberal economics, the media, religion and sectarianism.

The Making of New Zealand Cricket

100 Not Out: A Centennial History of the Auckland Cricket Association (Auckland, 1983). 50 Years of Cricket, 1921–71: A History of the ... Bose, M., A History of Indian Cricket (London, 1990). Bowden, R., Green Fields of Yesteryear ...

The Making of New Zealand Cricket

It is generally forgotten that cricket rather than rugby union was the 'national game' in New Zealand until the early years of the twentieth century. This book shows why and how cricket developed in New Zealand and how its character changed across time. Greg Ryan examines the emergence and growth of cricket in relation to diverse patterns of European settlement in New Zealand - such as the systematic colonization schemes of Edward Gibbon Wakefield and the gold discoveries of the 1860s. He then considers issues such as cricket and social class in the emerging cities; cricket and the elite school system; the function of the game in shaping relations between the New Zealand provinces; cricket encounters with the Australian colonies in the context of an 'Australasian' world. A central theme is cricketing relations with England at a time when New Zealand society was becoming acutely conscious of both its own identity and its place within the British Empire. This imperial relationship reveals structures, ideals and objectives unique to New Zealand. Articulate, engaging and entertaining, Ryan demonstrates convincingly how the cricketing experience of New Zealand was quite different from that of other colonies.

Sport Development and Olympic Studies

See Bhattacharya, A Dictionary of Indian History, 244; Farwell, Armies of the Raj, 26. See, for example, Edward Docker, History of Indian Cricket (Meerut: Macmillan Company of India, 1976); Richard Cashman, Patrons, Players and the ...

Sport Development and Olympic Studies

In 2017 the Olympic Studies Centre of the German Sport University organized a workshop on Sport Development and Olympic Studies. This book resulted from the presentations and discussions they engendered around identifying new international collaborative research fields and deepening research on the Olympics, the Olympic Movement and sport development. The effective application of the hermeneutical method unifies the chapters. The interpretive strengths of this method sharpen the analytical perspective of the chapters, with the strict requirements for the use of primary sources meaning that the contributors have conducted extensive archival research. Assuring thematic coherence, the studies assembled for this book focus on the analysis of processes of continuity, transformation, and development across four areas: sport institutions and their policies; commissions within and policies of governing bodies of sports; legacy discussions; and sport events within the summer and winter Olympic Games transformed into political and cultural spectacles. Bringing together experts in the field, Sport Development and Olympic Studies will be of great use to scholars of Sport Development, Sport History, The Olympics and Sport Sociology. This book was originally published as a special issue of The International Journal of the History of Sport.

The Cambridge Companion to Cricket

Birbalsingh, F., The Rise of West Indian Cricket: From Colony to Nation. St John's, antigua: hansib, 1996. Birbalsingh, F. and C. Shiwcharan, Indo-Westindian Cricket. London: hansib, 1988. Birley, d., A Social History of English Cricket ...

The Cambridge Companion to Cricket

Perfect for fans and scholars alike, this Companion explores cricket's origins, global reach, iconic personalities and enduring popularity.

Crickonomics

Bose, M., A History of Indian Cricket (Andre Deutsch, 2002). Bose, M., The Magic of Indian Cricket: Cricket and Society in India (Routledge, 2006). Cashman, R., Patrons, players and the crowd: the phenomenon of Indian cricket (Orient ...

Crickonomics

“Fascinating” The Observer “Illuminating” The Times “Crickonomics is packed with sufficient statistical analysis to have the most ardent cricket geek purring with pleasure” Mail on Sunday “An insightful, Hawk-Eye-like analysis of the numbers behind cricket” Financial Times An engaging tour of the modern game from an award-winning journalist and the economist who co-authored the bestselling Soccernomics. Why does England rely on private schools for their batters – but not their bowlers? How did demographics shape India's rise? Why have women often been the game's great innovators? Why does South Africa struggle to produce Black Test batters? And how does the weather impact who wins? Crickonomics explores all of this and much more – including how Jayasuriya and Gilchrist transformed Test batting but T20 didn't; English cricket's great missed opportunity to have a league structure like football; why batters are paid more than bowlers; how Afghanistan is transforming German cricket; what the rest of the world can learn from New Zealand and even the Barmy Army's importance to Test cricket. This incisive book will entertain and surprise all cricket lovers. It might even change how you watch the game.

Sport Culture and History

[17] Birbalsingh and Shiwcharan, Indo-Westindian Cricket. [18] Manley, A History of West Indian Cricket. [19] Contrast the recent sophisticated work of Rowe, Sport, Media, and Culture with his collaborative work with Geoffrey Lawrence ...

Sport  Culture and History

In addition to being an internationally recognised pioneer of sports history, Brian Stoddart has also been a leading thinker and influence in the field. That influence has crossed several areas of history, sociology, business, politics and media aspects of sports studies, and has drawn deeply upon his own training in Asian studies. His work has been characterised by cross-disciplinary work from the outset, and has encompassed some very different geographical areas as well as crossing from academic outlets to media commentary. As a result, his influential work has appeared in many different locations, and it has been difficult for a wide variety of readers to access it fully and easily. This volume draws together, in the one place for the first time, some of his most important academic and journalistic work. Importantly, the pieces are drawn together by an intellectual/autobiographical commentary that locates each piece in a wider social and cultural framework. This book was previously published as a special issue of Sport in Society

Legendary Indian Cricketers

The surrender by the Kangaroos provided the tonic and resulted in an about turn in the Indian cricket's fortune. The saga of success continued from there onwards. Ganguly's gladiators created a history by trouncing Pakistan on its home ...

Legendary Indian Cricketers

Legendary Indian Cricketers’ follow the form and format of the ragas of Indian classical music. The first phase, which spans over several decades, has the leisurely pace of village life; the second phase, which unfolds over the 1950s and 70s, goes with a simple, measured melodious beat; while the third is a kind of scherzo, where action is compressed into less than a day. All the same the scene, the setting and the structure of the Legendary Indian Cricketers (Men, Moments and Memories) are classically Indian. The echoes and the ethos too have a typical Indian flavour. ‘Legendary Indian Cricketers’ is a saga of some of the cricketers who have moulded the game and won acclaim both at home and abroad. The author has highlighted the contribution of 52 cricketers – ranging from Ranji to Umrigar, from Gavaskar to Sehwag, from Nissar to Srinath, from Pawlankar to Gupte, from Bedi to Harbhajan, from Amar Singh to Kapil, from Navle to Engineer and from Lall Singh to Kaif. The captaincy that spans from Nayudu to Kapil and Ganguly to Dhoni has added to the flavour of the book. Every legendary Indian cricketer is well portrayed and it provides interesting and informative ingredients to this absorbing work of reference.

America s Game s

Alexander, Charles C. Our Game: An American Baseball History. New York: Henry Holt, 1991. Appadurai, Arjun. 'Playing with Modernity: Decolonization of Indian Cricket'. In Consuming Modernity: Public Culture in a South Asian World, ...

America s Game s

This insightful volume considers how to locate America in the sporting world: in the traditions and rituals of a national pastime or in the baseball academies run by American professional teams in the Dominican Republic? With the athletes that carry a flag in Olympic ceremonies or among the executives in the boardrooms of Nike? The contributors argue that 'America' is located in these familiar sites and practices but also and increasingly in these novel contexts, where the bodies, strategies, and aspirations of others are becoming subject to American ludic, agonistic, and moral orders. Collectively, their contention is that American sports as a category needs to be reconsidered, to take into account the extensive networks of expertise, finance, and performance moving out from American athletic institutions as well as the ever increasing influx of talent coming from abroad that sustains American collegiate and professional athletics. As America strives to balance cosmopolitan objectives with resurgent nationalism, it is critical to consider 'American sports' from within and without. This book will be of great interest to scholars of culture, politics, and sport. This book was published as a special issue of the International Journal of the History of Sport.