A History of Nineteenth century American Women s Poetry

From these essays, a rich story emerges about a diverse poetics that was once immensely popular but has since been forgotten. This History confirms that the field has advanced far beyond the recovery of select individual poets.

A History of Nineteenth century American Women s Poetry

A History of Nineteenth-Century American Women's Poetry is the first book to construct a coherent history of the field and focus entirely on women's poetry of the period. With contributions from some of the most prominent scholars of nineteenth-century American literature, it explores a wide variety of authors, texts, and methodological approaches. Organized into three chronological sections, the essays examine multiple genres of poetry, consider poems circulated in various manuscript and print venues, and propose alternative ways of narrating literary history. From these essays, a rich story emerges about a diverse poetics that was once immensely popular but has since been forgotten. This History confirms that the field has advanced far beyond the recovery of select individual poets. It will be an invaluable resource for students, teachers, and critics of both the literature and the history of this era.

In Plain Sight

By reclaiming these conventions as a constitutive part of nineteenth-century American women's poetry, this book asks readers to take seriously the work these women produced and the role their work might play in remapping American literary ...

In Plain Sight

In Plain Sight explores how the poetry of nineteenth-century American women that was once so visible within American culture could have, with the exception of that by Emily Dickinson, so thoroughly disappeared from literary history. By investigating erasure not merely as something that was done to these women but as the result of the conventions that once made the circulation of their poetry possible in the first place, this volume offers the first book-length analysis of the conventions of nineteenth-century American women's poetry. While each of the chapters focuses on a specific convention, taken together they tell the complicated story of nineteenth-century American women's poetry, tracing the spaces within literary culture where it lived and thrived, the spaces from which it was always in the process of vanishing. By reclaiming these conventions as a constitutive part of nineteenth-century American women's poetry, this book asks readers to take seriously the work these women produced and the role their work might play in remapping American literary history.

A History of Nineteenth Century American Women s Poetry

In particular, see Mary Louise Kete, “The Reception of NineteenthCentury American Poetry,” Cambridge Companion to ... In Bennett, Poets in the Public Sphere, she associates several female poets of the 1890s as “imagist forerunners” or ...

A History of Nineteenth Century American Women s Poetry

A History of Nineteenth-Century American Women's Poetry is the first book to construct a coherent history of the field and focus entirely on women's poetry of the period. With contributions from some of the most prominent scholars of nineteenth-century American literature, it explores a wide variety of authors, texts, and methodological approaches. Organized into three chronological sections, the essays examine multiple genres of poetry, consider poems circulated in various manuscript and print venues, and propose alternative ways of narrating literary history. From these essays, a rich story emerges about a diverse poetics that was once immensely popular but has since been forgotten. This History confirms that the field has advanced far beyond the recovery of select individual poets. It will be an invaluable resource for students, teachers, and critics of both the literature and the history of this era.

Representations of Women

Representations of Women


Nineteenth Century American Women Poets

Previously neglected avant-garde poetry from the last decades of the century, as found in penny magazines of the period, is also thoroughly covered with compelling consequences for the understanding of Emily Dickinson and the early women ...

Nineteenth Century American Women Poets

Paula Bernat's anthology, based on seven years of pioneering archival research, establishes nineteenth-century American women's poetry as a major field in American literature and American women's history.

The Cambridge History of American Literature Volume 4 Nineteenth Century Poetry 1800 1910

This variegated background of Biblical dissemination frames the participation of nineteenth - century American women , including poets , in the project of interpreting Scripture . The poetry further underscores the mixture of opposing ...

The Cambridge History of American Literature  Volume 4  Nineteenth Century Poetry 1800 1910

Discusses the social, cultural, intellectual, and aesthetic aspects of American literature

The Social Lives of Poems in Nineteenth Century America

In short, it should be possible to develop a history as well as a theory of reader response. ... 2003); Mary Loeffelholz, From School to Salon: Reading Nineteenth-Century American Women's Poetry (Princeton, NJ: Princeton University ...

The Social Lives of Poems in Nineteenth Century America

Poetry occupied a complex position in the social life of nineteenth-century America. While some readers found in poems a resource for aesthetic pleasure and the enjoyment of linguistic complexity, many others turned to poems for spiritual and psychic wellbeing, adapted popular musical settings of poems to spread scandal and satire, or used poems as a medium for asserting personal and family memories as well as local and national affiliations. Poetry was not only read but memorized and quoted, rewritten and parodied, collected, anthologized, edited, and exchanged. Michael C. Cohen here explores the multiplicity of imaginative relationships forged between poems and those who made use of them from the post-Revolutionary era to the turn of the twentieth century. Organized along a careful genealogy of ballads in the Atlantic world, The Social Lives of Poems in Nineteenth-Century America demonstrates how the circulation of texts in songs, broadsides, letters, and newsprint as well as in books, anthologies, and critical essays enabled poetry to perform its many different tasks. Considering the media and modes of reading through which people encountered and made sense of poems, Cohen traces the lines of critical interpretations and tracks the emergence and disappearance of poetic genres in American literary culture. Examining well-known works by John Greenleaf Whittier and Walt Whitman as well as popular ballads, minstrel songs, and spirituals, Cohen shows how discourses on poetry served as sites for debates over history, literary culture, citizenship, and racial identity.

Major Voices

An introductory essay to the book identifies central concerns, historical backgrounds, evolving patterns and poetic issues, while there is also a specific introduction for each poet. Book jacket.

Major Voices

There are a number of anthologies of nineteenth-century American women poets in print, but these tend to offer a very small sample of poems from a very large number of writers, often based around a specific topical concern. "Major Voices, this Toby anthology, compiled and edited by Shira Wolosky, will instead present a substantial number of texts by a select group of poets--focusing in depth on the major voices of that time. This anthology will thus allow the reader the opportunity to engage more deeply with the poetry; to see the range within each poet's writings, and the relation among the poets. An introductory essay will identify central concerns, historical backgrounds, evolving patterns and poetic issues, as marked through the course of the century. The work of these poets provides a gripping view of the creativity of nineteenth-century American women that has been until recently almost entirely lost to literary history. Supremely relevant to today's readers, this is poetry that began the efforts at the redefinition of self, of America, and of womanhood that continues to touch the lives and thoughts of so many today.

A History of Twentieth Century American Women s Poetry

As twentiethcentury American women poets launched their poetic experiments and initiated the modernist project of “making it new,” they did so in a culture of democratic experiment that was already wellestablished by the late nineteenth ...

A History of Twentieth Century American Women s Poetry

A History of Twentieth-Century American Women's Poetry explores the genealogy of modern American verse by women from the early twentieth century to the millennium. Beginning with an extensive introduction that charts important theoretical contributions to the field, this History includes wide-ranging essays that illuminate the legacy of American women poets. Organized thematically, these essays survey the multilayered verse of such diverse poets as Edna St Vincent Millay, Marianne Moore, Anne Sexton, Adrienne Rich, and Audre Lorde. Written by a host of leading scholars, this History also devotes special attention to the lasting significance of feminist literary criticism. This book is of pivotal importance to the development of women's poetry in America and will serve as an invaluable reference for specialists and students alike.

WOMEN S WRITINGS IN THE NINETEENTH AND TWENTIETH CENTURIES

This book will be treasured not only by students but also by those who wish to study critically the feminist writings of the period. In addition, it will enrich readers’ understanding of American and British literary history and culture.

WOMEN   S WRITINGS IN THE NINETEENTH AND TWENTIETH CENTURIES

Intended as a text for undergraduate students of English for their course on Women’s Writings in the Nineteenth and Twentieth centuries, this compact and well-organized book provides both the history of the development of the short story in America and Britain and a comprehensive introduction to the modes on critical practices based on feminist thinking. It takes into account the strategies used by women writers, and discusses the politics of reception and production keeping especially the gender issue in mind. The text is divided into three parts—Part I: Introduction—containing two chapters that deal with the development of the American short story and the resurgence of radical feminism in America. These provide the historical and the feminist frame within which the short stories by the Anglo American Women’s Writers should be read. Part II gives four short stories: Kate Chopin—The Story of An Hour; Charlotte Perkins Gilman—The Yellow Wallpaper; Willa Cather—Coming, Aphrodite!; and Katherine Mansfield—Bliss. Each short story is preceded by a critical introduction, detailed references for further reading, and a biographical time line. Part III comprises three critical essays which provide sharp insights into the period in which the four women writers were writing. This book will be treasured not only by students but also by those who wish to study critically the feminist writings of the period. In addition, it will enrich readers’ understanding of American and British literary history and culture. The critical introduction to each short story traces the development of the form from its origins, both historically and in terms of female literary contributions to its development. The chapter on Radical Feminism is mapped in the context of social, political and cultural development. The book provides historical, literary and biographical contexts of the writers and their short stories.

The Oxford Handbook of Edgar Allan Poe

This is the poem's fantasy, heard like “the echo, in you, [that] breaks upon the words which you are speaking.” Only this, and nothing more. ... 2 (2016); and essays in the History of Nineteenth-Century American Women's Poetry, ed.

The Oxford Handbook of Edgar Allan Poe

No American author of the early 19th century enjoys a larger international audience than Edgar Allan Poe. Widely translated, read, and studied, he occupies an iconic place in global culture. Such acclaim would have gratified Poe, who deliberately wrote for "the world at large" and mocked the provincialism of strictly nationalistic themes. Partly for this reason, early literary historians cast Poe as an outsider, regarding his dark fantasies as extraneous to American life and experience. Only in the 20th century did Poe finally gain a prominent place in the national canon. Changing critical approaches have deepened our understanding of Poe's complexity and revealed an author who defies easy classification. New models of interpretation have excited fresh debates about his essential genius, his subversive imagination, his cultural insight, and his ultimate impact, urging an expansive reconsideration of his literary achievement. Edited by leading experts J. Gerald Kennedy and Scott Peeples, this volume presents a sweeping reexamination of Poe's work. Forty-five distinguished scholars address Poe's troubled life and checkered career as a "magazinist," his poetry and prose, and his reviews, essays, opinions, and marginalia. The chapters provide fresh insights into Poe's lasting impact on subsequent literature, music, art, comics, and film and illuminate his radical conception of the universe, science, and the human mind. Wide-ranging and thought-provoking, this Handbook reveals a thoroughly modern Poe, whose timeless fables of peril and loss will continue to attract new generations of readers and scholars.

Nineteenth Century American Women Writers and Theologies of the Afterlife

1 Notably, Mormon women in their poetry rarely differentiate between the spirit world and heaven. Instead Mormon women mirror their religious contemporaries ... Cohen, Michael C. The Social Lives of Poems in Nineteenth-Century America.

Nineteenth Century American Women Writers and Theologies of the Afterlife

This collection analyzes the theme of the "afterlife" as it animated nineteenth-century American women’s theology-making and appeals for social justice. Authors like Harriet Beecher Stowe, Elizabeth Stuart Phelps, Martha Finley, Jarena Lee, Maria Stewart, Zilpha Elaw, Rebecca Cox Jackson, Catherine Maria Sedgwick, Elizabeth Palmer Peabody, Belinda Marden Pratt, and others wrote to have a voice in the moral debates that were consuming churches and national politics. These texts are expressions of the lives and dynamic minds of women who developed sophisticated, systematic spiritual and textual approaches to the divine, to their denominations or religious traditions, and to the mainstream culture around them. Women do not simply live out theologies authored by men. Rather, Nineteenth-Century American Women Writers and Theologies of the Afterlife: A Step Closer to Heaven is grounded in the radical notion that the theological principles crafted by women and derived from women’s experiences, intellectual habits, and organizational capabilities are foundational to American literature itself.

From School to Salon

Presents the work of nineteenth-century women poets in the context of the history, culture, and politics of the times.

From School to Salon

Presents the work of nineteenth-century women poets in the context of the history, culture, and politics of the times.

American Women Poets of the Nineteenth Century

INTRODUCTION In the nineteenth century the world of publication opened up to women poets to a startling , some even ... many of them familiar to students of American history but until recently often overlooked in the study of poetry .

American Women Poets of the Nineteenth Century

An anthology of nineteenth-century American women's poetry includes the humorous parodies of Mary Weston Fordham and the abolitionist poems of Frances Harper.

Romantic Education in Nineteenth Century American Literature

Fictions of Female Education in the Nineteenth Century. New York: Routledge, 2009. Print. ... The Story of A: The Alphabetization of America from The New England Primer to The Scarlet Letter. Stanford: Stanford UP, 2000. Print.

Romantic Education in Nineteenth Century American Literature

American publishing in the long nineteenth century was flooded with readers, primers, teaching-training manuals, children’s literature, and popular periodicals aimed at families. These publications attest to an abiding faith in the power of pedagogy that has its roots in transatlantic Romantic conceptions of pedagogy and literacy. The essays in this collection examine the on-going influence of Romanticism in the long nineteenth century on American thinking about education, as depicted in literary texts, in historical accounts of classroom dynamics, or in pedagogical treatises. They also point out that though this influence was generally progressive, the benefits of this social change did not reach many parts of American society. This book is therefore an important reference for scholars of Romantic studies, American studies, historical pedagogy and education.

Overwhelmed

For poetic extracts in the nineteenth century, see Glazener, Literature in the Making, 27–29. See also Alexandra Socarides, “Making and Unmaking a Canon: American Women's Poetry and the Nineteenth-Century Anthology,” in A History of ...

Overwhelmed

An engaging look at how debates over the fate of literature in our digital age are powerfully conditioned by the nineteenth century's information revolution What happens to literature during an information revolution? How do readers and writers adapt to proliferating data and texts? These questions appear uniquely urgent today in a world of information overload, big data, and the digital humanities. But as Maurice Lee shows in Overwhelmed, these concerns are not new—they also mattered in the nineteenth century, as the rapid expansion of print created new relationships between literature and information. Exploring four key areas—reading, searching, counting, and testing—in which nineteenth-century British and American literary practices engaged developing information technologies, Overwhelmed delves into a diverse range of writings, from canonical works by Coleridge, Emerson, Charlotte Brontë, Hawthorne, and Dickens to lesser-known texts such as popular adventure novels, standardized literature tests, antiquarian journals, and early statistical literary criticism. In doing so, Lee presents a new argument: rather than being at odds, as generations of critics have viewed them, literature and information in the nineteenth century were entangled in surprisingly collaborative ways. An unexpected, historically grounded look at how a previous information age offers new ways to think about the anxieties and opportunities of our own, Overwhelmed illuminates today’s debates about the digital humanities, the crisis in the humanities, and the future of literature.

Poets in the Public Sphere

LITERARY STUDIES | WOMEN'S HISTORY Poets in the Public Sphere The Emancipatory Project of American Women's Poetry ... There is no doubt that this book will be the most important single survey of nineteenthcentury American women's verse ...

Poets in the Public Sphere

Between 1800 & 1900, in America, there emerged a 'new woman' who strove for her emancipation.

Transamerican Sentimentalism and Nineteenth Century US Literary History

Gabrielle Foreman, “Manifest in Signs: The Politics of Sex and Representation in Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl,” 76–99; ... Paula Bernat Bennett, Poets in the Public Sphere: The Emancipatory Project of American Women's Poetry, ...

Transamerican Sentimentalism and Nineteenth Century US Literary History

Sentimentalism is usually studied through US-British relations after the American Revolution or in connection to national reforms like the abolitionist movement. Transamerican Sentimentalism and Nineteenth-Century US Literary History instead argues that African American, Native American, Latinx, and Anglo American women writers also used sentimentalism to construct narratives that reframed or countered the violence dominating the nineteenth-century Americas, including the Haitian Revolution, Indian Removal, the US-Mexican War, and Cuba's independence wars. By tracking the transformation of sentimentalism as the US reacted to, enacted, and intervened in conflict Transamerican Sentimentalism and Nineteenth-Century US Literary History demonstrates how marginalized writers negotiated hemispheric encounters amidst the gendered, racialized, and cultural violence of the nineteenth-century Americas. It remaps sentiment's familiar transatlantic and national scholarly frameworks through authors such as Leonora Sansay and Mary Peabody Mann, and considers how authors including John Rollin Ridge, John S. and Harriet Jacobs, María Amparo Ruiz de Burton, Victor Séjour, and Martin R. Delany adapted the mode. Transamerican sentimentalism cannot unseat the violence of the nineteenth-century Americas, but it does produce other potential outcomes-including new paradigms for understanding the coquette, a locally successful informal diplomacy, and motivations for violent slave revolt. Such transformations mark not sentiment's failures or distortions, but its adaptive attempts to survive and thrive.

Victorian Sappho

Feminist criticism in particular has been interested in reclaiming a literary tradition of “ lost " women poets , whose ... which “ rediscovers rich and diverse female traditions " ; or Nineteenth - Century American Women Poets : An ...

Victorian Sappho

What is Sappho, except a name? Although the Greek archaic lyrics attributed to Sappho of Lesbos survive only in fragments, she has been invoked for many centuries as the original woman poet, singing at the origins of a Western lyric tradition. Victorian Sappho traces the emergence of this idealized feminine figure through reconstructions of the Sapphic fragments in late-nineteenth-century England. Yopie Prins argues that the Victorian period is a critical turning point in the history of Sappho's reception; what we now call "Sappho" is in many ways an artifact of Victorian poetics. Prins reads the Sapphic fragments in Greek alongside various English translations and imitations, considering a wide range of Victorian poets--male and female, famous and forgotten--who signed their poetry in the name of Sappho. By "declining" the name in each chapter, the book presents a theoretical argument about the Sapphic signature, as well as a historical account of its implications in Victorian England. Prins explores the relations between classical philology and Victorian poetics, the tropes of lesbian writing, the aesthetics of meter, and nineteenth-century personifications of the "Poetess." as current scholarship on Sappho and her afterlife. Offering a history and theory of lyric as a gendered literary form, the book is an exciting and original contribution to Victorian studies, classical studies, comparative literature, and women's studies.

Album Verses and Romantic Literary Culture

... in A History of Nineteenth Century American Women's Poetry , ed . and intr . Jennifer Putzi and Alexandra Socarides ( Cambridge : Cambridge University Press , 2017 ) , 68-86 ( 82 ) . 18 Michelle Levy , Family Authorship and Romantic ...

Album Verses and Romantic Literary Culture

'Will you write in my album?' Many Romantic poets were asked this question by women who collected contributions in their manuscript books. Those who obliged included Byron, Scott, Wordsworth, and Lamb, but also Felicia Hemans, Amelia Opie, and Sara Coleridge. Album Verses and Romantic Literary Culture presents the first critical and cultural history of this forgotten phenomenon. It asks a series of questions. Where did 1820s 'albo-mania' come from, and why was it satirized as a women's 'mania'? What was the relation between visitors' books associated with great institutions and country houses, personal albums belonging to individuals, and the poetry written in both? What caused albums' re-gendering from earlier friendship books kept by male students and gentlemen on the Grand Tour to a 'feminized' practice identified mainly with young women? When albums were central to women's culture, why were so many published album poems by men? How did amateur and professional poets engage differently with albums? What does album culture's privileging of 'original poetry' have to say about attitudes towards creativity and poetic practice in the age of print? This volume recovers a distinctive subgenre of occasional poetry composed to be read in manuscript, with its own characteristic formal features, conventions, themes, and cultural significance. Unique albums examined include that kept at the Grande Chartreuse, those owned by Regency socialite Lady Sarah Jersey, and those kept by Lake poets' daughters. As Album Verses and Romantic Literary Culture shows, album poetry reflects changing attitudes to identity, gender, class, politics, poetry, family dynamics, and social relations in the Romantic period.