Philadelphia s Lost Waterfront

Join Harry Kyriakodis as he strolls Front Street, Delaware Avenue, and Penn's Landing to rediscover the story of Philadelphia's lost waterfront.

Philadelphia s Lost Waterfront

The wharves and docks of William Penn's city that helped build a nation are gone lost to the onslaught of over 300 years of development. Yet the bygone streets and piers of Philadelphia's central waterfront were once part of the greatest trade center in the American colonies. Local historian Harry Kyriakodis chronicles the history of the city's original port district from Quaker settlers who first lived in caves along the Delaware and the devastating yellow fever epidemic of 1793 to its heyday as a maritime center and then the twentieth century that saw much of the historic riverfront razed. Join Kyriakodis as he strolls Front Street, Delaware Avenue, and Penn's Landing to rediscover the story of Philadelphia's lost waterfront.

Quarters

John Russell Young, Memorial History of the City of Philadelphia from Its First
Settlement to the Year 1895, 2 vols. ... Pargellis, Lord Loudoun, 202; Harry
Kyriakodis, Philadelphia's Lost Waterfront (Charleston, S.C.: History Press, 2011),
19, 23; ...

Quarters

When Americans declared independence in 1776, they cited King George III "for quartering large bodies of armed troops among us." In Quarters, John Gilbert McCurdy explores the social and political history behind the charge, offering an authoritative account of the housing of British soldiers in America. Providing new interpretations and analysis of the Quartering Act of 1765, McCurdy sheds light on a misunderstood aspect of the American Revolution. Quarters unearths the vivid debate in eighteenth-century America over the meaning of place. It asks why the previously uncontroversial act of accommodating soldiers in one's house became an unconstitutional act. In so doing, Quarters reveals new dimensions of the origins of Americans' right to privacy. It also traces the transformation of military geography in the lead up to independence, asking how barracks changed cities and how attempts to reorder the empire and the borderland led the colonists to imagine a new nation. Quarters emphatically refutes the idea that the Quartering Act forced British soldiers in colonial houses, demonstrates the effectiveness of the Quartering Act at generating revenue, and examines aspects of the law long ignored, such as its application in the backcountry and its role in shaping Canadian provinces. Above all, Quarters argues that the lessons of accommodating British troops outlasted the Revolutionary War, profoundly affecting American notions of place. McCurdy shows that the Quartering Act had significant ramifications, codified in the Third Amendment, for contemporary ideas of the home as a place of domestic privacy, the city as a place without troops, and a nation with a civilian-led military.

Northern Liberties

In this first history of Northern Liberties, Kyriakodis unearths the story of this remarkable riverside community.

Northern Liberties

Since the time of William Penn, the Philadelphia neighborhood of Northern Liberties has had a tradition of hard work and innovation. This former Leni-Lenape territory became one of the industrial River Wards of North Philadelphia after being annexed by the city in 1854. The district's mills and factories were powered not just by the Delaware River and its tributaries but also by immigrants from across Europe and the city's largest community of free African Americans. The Liberties' diverse narrative, however, was marred by political and social problems, such as the anti-Irish Nativist Riots of 1844. Local historian Harry Kyriakodis traces over three hundred years of the district's evolution, from its rise as a premier manufacturing precinct to the destruction of much of the original cityscape in the 1960s and its subsequent rebirth as an eclectic and vibrant urban neighborhood. In this first history of Northern Liberties, Kyriakodis unearths the story of this remarkable riverside community.

Philadelphia s Old Southwark District

Keels, Thomas H. Forgotten Philadelphia: Lost Architecture of the Quaker City.
Philadelphia: Temple University Press, 2007. Kyriakodis, Harry. Philadelphia's
Lost Waterfront. Charleston, SC: The History Press, 2011. Lynch, M. Antonia.

Philadelphia s Old Southwark District

The area along the banks of the Delaware River originally known as Philadelphia s Southwark District encompasses the present-day neighborhoods of Queen Village, Pennsport, and Dickinson Square West. Southwark s deep history is tied to its relationship to the waterfront and the multitude of immigrant communities that settled its streets. The Washington Avenue Immigration Station, Southwark s counterpart to Ellis Island, was a testament to the waves of immigrants reaching America s shores in the 19th and early 20th centuries. Many of the immigrants who stayed in Philadelphia found inexpensive housing in Southwark and employment along the waterfront. Today, the neighborhoods of old Southwark continue to embrace diversity. Many of the area s historic houses still stand alongside newly built homes. While the construction of high-volume roadways cut off the neighborhoods from the waterfront, new efforts are reconnecting Southwark to the river through improved access points and attractive waterfront recreation areas."

Philadelphia s Old Southwark District

Keels, Thomas H. Forgotten Philadelphia: Lost Architecture of the Quaker City.
Philadelphia: Temple University Press, 2007. Kyriakodis, Harry. Philadelphia's
Lost Waterfront. Charleston, SC: The History Press, 2011. Lynch, M. Antonia.

Philadelphia s Old Southwark District

The area along the banks of the Delaware River originally known as Philadelphia’s Southwark District encompasses the present-day neighborhoods of Queen Village, Pennsport, and Dickinson Square West. Southwark’s deep history is tied to its relationship to the waterfront and the multitude of immigrant communities that settled its streets. The Washington Avenue Immigration Station, Southwark’s counterpart to Ellis Island, was a testament to the waves of immigrants reaching America’s shores in the 19th and early 20th centuries. Many of the immigrants who stayed in Philadelphia found inexpensive housing in Southwark and employment along the waterfront. Today, the neighborhoods of old Southwark continue to embrace diversity. Many of the area’s historic houses still stand alongside newly built homes. While the construction of high-volume roadways cut off the neighborhoods from the waterfront, new efforts are reconnecting Southwark to the river through improved access points and attractive waterfront recreation areas.

Philadelphia Mansions Stories and Characters behind the Walls

Jamison, Kay Redfield. Robert Lowell: Setting the River on Fire. New York: Alfred
A. Knopf, 2017. Kyriakodis, Harry. Philadelphia's Lost Waterfront. Charleston, SC:
The History Press, 2011. Lord, James. A Gift for Admiration: Further Memoirs.

Philadelphia Mansions  Stories and Characters behind the Walls

Philadelphia's grand mansions and architectural treasures reflect its iconic status in American history, for each Greek Revival home and Corinthian column tells a compelling story of the people behind it. Historic Strawberry Mansion in North Philadelphia was home to Judge William Lewis, a Patriot who defended colonists accused of treason and was Aaron Burr's defense lawyer. Socialite, millionaire and world-renowned art collector Henry McIlhenny made his home at Rittenhouse Square and left his art collection to the Philadelphia Museum of Art. Famed architect Addison Mizner's Spanish Colonial Revival house La Ronda brought the stark contrast of South Florida to Philadelphia. Author Thom Nickels presents the city's most iconic homes and the stories behind them.

Underground Philadelphia From Caves and Canals to Tunnels and Transit

Join authors Harry Kyriakodis and Joel Spivak as they reveal the curious aspects of the Quaker City's underground experience.

Underground Philadelphia  From Caves and Canals to Tunnels and Transit

Philadelphia's relationship with the underground is as old as the city itself, dating back to when Quaker settlers resided in caves alongside the Delaware River more than three hundred years ago. The City of Brotherly Love later became a national and world leader in the delivery of water, gas, steam, and electricity during the industrial age. The construction of multiple subway lines within Center City took place during the early twentieth century. An intricate subsurface pedestrian concourse was also developed throughout the downtown area for the city's inhabitants. From Thirtieth Street Station and Reading Terminal to the Commuter Rail Tunnel and transit lines that were never built, Philadelphia's infrastructure history is buried under the earth as much as above. Join authors Harry Kyriakodis and Joel Spivak as they reveal the curious aspects of the Quaker City's underground experience.

Northern Liberties

In this first history of Northern Liberties, Kyriakodis unearths the story of this remarkable riverside community.

Northern Liberties

Since the time of William Penn, the Philadelphia neighborhood of Northern Liberties has had a tradition of hard work and innovation. This former Leni-Lenape territory became one of the industrial River Wards of North Philadelphia after being annexed by the city in 1854. The district's mills and factories were powered not just by the Delaware River and its tributaries but also by immigrants from across Europe and the city's largest community of free African Americans. The Liberties' diverse narrative, however, was marred by political and social problems, such as the anti-Irish Nativist Riots of 1844. Local historian Harry Kyriakodis traces over three hundred years of the district's evolution, from its rise as a premier manufacturing precinct to the destruction of much of the original cityscape in the 1960s and its subsequent rebirth as an eclectic and vibrant urban neighborhood. In this first history of Northern Liberties, Kyriakodis unearths the story of this remarkable riverside community.

Waterfront Workers

92 “ The history of the Philadelphia Longshoremen ' s connection with the I . W .
W . is one of unswerving loyalty to its ... It is our action or inaction here , ” it read , "
that will decide whether we have completely lost the longshoremen of this port ...

Waterfront Workers

Few work settings can compete with the waterfront for a long, rich history of multi-ethnic and multiracial interaction. Here, five scholars focus on the complex relationships involved in this intersection of race, class, and ethnicity. "Opens up some of the most significant questions in American labor and social history.--David Brundage, THE MAKING OF WESTERN LABOR RADICALISM: DENVER'S ORGANIZED WORKERS.

A History of American Dwellings

The people of New York had lost their waterfront — save Coney Island — fifty
years before ; and Philadelphia was even less fortunate than Chicago or New
York . The " City of Brotherly Love ” is , therefore , now engaged in one of the
nation ' s ...

A History of American Dwellings


Philadelphia Off the Beaten Path

Philadelphia   Off the Beaten Path

Discover the less-well-known side of Philadelphia and enjoy funky shops and eateries, truly unique museums and galleries, and obscure theater and music venues.

A Graphic History of Delaware County

Later in the century Chester declined as a business center , and the waterfront
lost some of its industrial giants , offset in part ... The Philadelphia International
Airport is located partly in Tinicum in the southeasternmost corner of the County .

A Graphic History of Delaware County


Records of the American Catholic Historical Society of Philadelphia

Memorial Mass Mass was celebrated at Old St. Mary's , 48 S. Fourth Street ,
Philadelphia on September 21 , 1997 at 2:00 p . m . ... Since our Memorial Mass
in April of 1996 , we lost two past presidents , J. Robert Mendte ( 1981-1983 )
who died in December 1996 and John T. ... We toured the old house , steeped in
Catholic history and the beautiful terraced gardens which sloped down to the
waterfront .

Records of the American Catholic Historical Society of Philadelphia


Travel Smart

Part 1 City Insider Report Philadelphia New York Face To Face With History . ...
Ben Franklin's penny - saving maxim has ner and maps on posts in the
Harrisburg never been lost on Philadelphia . ... In short , Pass , $ 5.50 , incl 1 -
way to the The Historic & Waterfront District runs Philadelphia is not only
historically airport .

Travel Smart


First City

Philadelphia and the Forging of Historical Memory Gary B. Nash ... left the next
year for the new national capital on the shores of the Potomac River,
Philadelphia lost some of its cosmopolitan Sheen. ... some of his views give a
feeling for Philadelphia's busy street life and waterfront character while
emphasizing the new ...

First City

With its rich foundation stories, Philadelphia may be the most important city in America's collective memory. By the middle of the eighteenth century William Penn's "greene countrie town" was, after London, the largest city in the British Empire. The two most important documents in the history of the United States, the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution, were drafted and signed in Philadelphia. The city served off and on as the official capital of the young country until 1800, and was also the site of the first American university, hospital, medical college, bank, paper mill, zoo, sugar refinery, public school, and government mint. In First City, acclaimed historian Gary B. Nash examines the complex process of memory making in this most historic of American cities. Though history is necessarily written from the evidence we have of the past, as Nash shows, rarely is that evidence preserved without intent, nor is it equally representative. Full of surprising anecdotes, First City reveals how Philadelphians—from members of elite cultural institutions, such as historical societies and museums, to relatively anonymous groups, such as women, racial and religious minorities, and laboring people—have participated in the very partisan activity of transmitting historical memory from one generation to the next.

The American Historical Scene

PHILADELPHIA WATERFRONT 1702 ! By Horace Mather Lippincott C 1
HESTNUT STREET and the Delaware River at Philadelphia in 1702 was a
primitive place . ... Pastorius says he was often lost in the woods and brush going
from his cave along the river bank to the house of the Dutch baker , Bom , at the
southeast ...

The American Historical Scene


Digging in the City of Brotherly Love

This intriguing book explores eighteenth- and nineteenth-century Philadelphia through the findings of archaeological excavations, sharing with readers the excitement of digging into the past and reconstructing the lives of earlier ...

Digging in the City of Brotherly Love

Beneath the modern city of Philadelphia lie countless clues to its history and the lives of residents long forgotten. This intriguing book explores eighteenth- and nineteenth-century Philadelphia through the findings of archaeological excavations, sharing with readers the excitement of digging into the past and reconstructing the lives of earlier inhabitants of the city.Urban archaeologist Rebecca Yamin describes the major excavations that have been undertaken since 1992 as part of the redevelopment of Independence Mall and surrounding areas, explaining how archaeologists gather and use raw data to learn more about the ordinary people whose lives were never recorded in history books. Focusing primarily on these unknown citizens-an accountant in the first Treasury Department, a coachmaker whose clients were politicians doing business at the State House, an African American founder of St. Thomas’s African Episcopal Church, and others-Yamin presents a colorful portrait of old Philadelphia. She also discusses political aspects of archaeology today-who supports particular projects and why, and what has been lost to bulldozers and heedlessness. Digging in the City of Brotherly Love tells the exhilarating story of doing archaeology in the real world and using its findings to understand the past.

Philadelphia and the Pennsylvania Dutch Country

PHILADELPHIA ' S OTHER LEGACY seum itself , host to Rocky - like runners
who raise their arms in salute during early morning jaunts . ... Benjamin Franklin
Bridge provides a tough but rewarding 3 / 2 - mi round - trip run with a terrific view
of the Delaware River waterfront . ... Indeed , Philadelphia has played a vital role
in the history of boxing . ... Camden ' s Jersey Joe Walcott was the region ' s first
heavyweight champ , but he lost to Rocky Marciano in 1952 in what Herman
Taylor ...

Philadelphia and the Pennsylvania Dutch Country

America's favorite travel series has a whole new look--lively, bright, and bursting with information. Two-color, bulleted maps.

Sea History

Nevertheless , when the Philadelphia Navy Yard flourished . Relocated from the
the innovative John Roach resolved to build iron steamships , central
Philadelphia waterfront where Joshua Humphreys had he came from New York
to take over ...

Sea History


Urban Land

... the key players in the area ' s redevelopment , calls “ one of the most fas -
cinating adventure stories in modern urban history . ... Bolstered by the success
of this first project , Baltimore turned to its blighted waterfront and transformed it
into the Inner ... Meanwhile , between 1990 and 2000 , the city of Baltimore lost
another 85 , 000 resi - dents , having lost more than ... Whether it is urban villages
in Arlington County , Virginia , or live / work apartments in Philadelphia , zoning is
taking ...

Urban Land