A Love Letter to Texas Women

After decades of observing Texas women, Bird knows the species as few others do. A Love Letter to Texas Women is a must-have guide for newcomers to the state and the ideal gift to tell any Yellow Rose how special she is.

A Love Letter to Texas Women

What is it that distinguishes Texas women—the famous Yellow Rose and her descendants? Is it that combination of graciousness and grit that we revere in First Ladies Laura Bush and Lady Bird Johnson? The rapier-sharp wit that Ann Richards and Molly Ivins used to skewer the good ole boy establishment? The moral righteousness with which Barbara Jordan defended the US constitution? An unnatural fondness for Dr Pepper and queso? In her inimitable style, Sarah Bird pays tribute to the Texas Woman in all her glory and all her contradictions. She humorously recalls her own early bewildered attempts to understand Lone Star gals, from the big-haired, perfectly made-up ladies at the Hyde Park Beauty Salon to her intellectual, quinoa-eating roommates at Seneca House Co-op for Graduate Women. After decades of observing Texas women, Bird knows the species as few others do. A Love Letter to Texas Women is a must-have guide for newcomers to the state and the ideal gift to tell any Yellow Rose how special she is.

Texas Women

Paula Mitchell Marks, Hands to the Spindle: Texas Women and Home Textile
Production, 1822– 1880 (College ... see Randolph B. Campbell and Donald K.
Pickens, “Documents: 'My Dear Husband': A Texas Slave's Love Letter, 1862,” ...

Texas Women

"This is a collection of biographies and composite essays of Texas women, contextualized over the course of history to include subjects that reflect the enormous racial, class, and religious diversity of the state. Offering insights into the complex ways that Texas' position on the margins of the United States has shaped a particular kind of gendered experience there, the volume also demonstrates how the larger questions in United States women's history are answered or reconceived in the state. Beginning with Juliana Barr's essay, which asserts that 'women marked the lines of dominion among Spanish and Indian nations in Texas' and explodes the myth of Spanish domination in colonial Texas, the essays examine the ways that women were able to use their borderland status to stretch the boundaries of their own lives. Eric Walther demonstrates that the constant changing of governments in Texas (Spanish, Mexican, Texan, and U.S.) gave slaves the opportunities to resist their oppression because of the differences in the laws of slavery under Spanish or English or American law. Gabriela Gonzalez examines the activism of Jovita Idar on behalf of civil rights for Mexicans and Mexican Americans on both sides of the border. Renee Laegreid argues that female rodeo contestants employed a "unique regional interplay of masculine and feminine behaviors" to shape their identities as cowgirls"--Site web de l'éditeur.

Black Women in Texas History

Campbell, Empirefor Slavery, 51; Winegarten, Black Texas Women, 16; Boswell,
HerAct ana' Deea', 79—91; Malone, ... Randolph Campbell and Donald K.
Pickens, “My Dear— est Husband': A Texas Slave's Love Letter, 1862,” journal ...

Black Women in Texas History

Though often consigned to the footnotes of history, African American women are a significant part of the rich, multiethnic heritage of Texas and the United States. Until now, though, their story has frequently been fragmented and underappreciated. "Black Women in Texas History" draws together a multi-author narrative of the experiences and impact of black American women from the time of slavery until the recent past. Each chapter, written by an expert on the era, provides a readable survey and overview of the lives and roles of black Texas women during that period. Each provides careful documentation, which, along with the thorough bibliography compiled by the volume editors, will provide a starting point for others wanting to build on this important topic. The authors address significant questions about population demographics, employment patterns, family and social dimensions, legal and political rights, and individual accomplishments. They look not only at how African American women have been shaped by the larger culture but also at how these women have, in turn, affected the culture and history of Texas. This work situates African American women within the context of their times and offers a due appreciation and analysis of their lives and accomplishments. "Black Women in Texas History" is an important addition to history and sociology curriculums as well as black studies and women's studies programs. It will provide for interested students, scholars, and general readers a comprehensive survey of the crucial role these women played in shaping the history of the Lone Star State.

African American Women Confront the West 1600 2000

Fanny Perry , a Harrison County , Texas , slave woman has provided one such
opportunity with the letter she wrote to her husband , Norfleet Perry , personal
servant of Theophilus Perry , who at the time was serving with the 28th Texas ...

African American Women Confront the West  1600 2000

Reconstructs the history of black women’s participation in western settlement “A stellar collection of essays by talented authors who explore fascinating topics.”—Journal of American Ethnic History African American Women Confront the West, 1600–2000 is the first major historical anthology on the topic. The editors argue that African American women in the West played active, though sometimes unacknowledged, roles in shaping the political, ideological, and social currents that have influenced the United States over the past three centuries. Contributors to this volume explore African American women’s life experiences in the West, their influences on the experiences of the region’s diverse peoples, and their legacy in rural and urban communities from Montana to Texas and from California to Kansas. The essayists explore what it has meant to be an African American woman, from the era of Spanish colonial rule in eighteenth-century New Mexico to the black power era of the 1960s and 1970s.

The Grand Prairie Years

Dorothy is worrying because she can't find out who I am writing to . ... How
prosaic it seems for a love letter . ... Many Texas women in that era understood
the unvarnished love letters of their men and said , " He ain't no big love maker
with ...

The Grand Prairie Years


Texas Women in World War II

Of course Marjorie and I being from Texas are always on the lookout for a fellow
Texan and we have found a number of them. ... Must close as I owe lots of letters
and since they are the most important thing in one's life there, I must get some of
... All My Love, Pat 3 January 1945 Leyte, Philippine Islands Dearest Eleanor, ...

Texas Women in World War II

Women are all too easily forgotten when it comes to war. In this unique volume, Cindy Weigand tells the individual stories of female WWII veterans now living in Texas. These courageious women reveal their war experiences detailing physical exams, troop train rides, and coping with the reactions of their families. They describe the trials of seeing fiances one day and losing them the next, healing the emotional and mental as well as the physical wounds, and enduring extreme conditions in service to their country.

Women and Texas History

Women and Texas History

"An attempt to show what sort of materials are accessible within the state for researchers in Texas women's history."--From the preface.

Texas Women Writers

( Embree ) , 72 “ Lesson in Semantics , A ” ( De Hoyos ) , 221 Let ' s Pretend (
Simond ) , 248 Letters from Early Texas Settlers ( Cardelle ) , 60 Letters from Fort
Sill ( Brown ) , 55 Letters from the United States . . . ( Murray ) , 52 Letters of an ...

Texas Women Writers

A critical survey of over 150 years of Texas women writers, including fiction and nonfiction authors, poets, and dramatists.

My Year of Meats

She said it was a love letter from your lover in America. . . ." "So you read it?" "Of
course I read it. It is my right. As your wife, I ... He has a soft spot in his heart for
Texas women. Bunny and her ancient husband drove me to a beef trade show, ...

My Year of Meats

A cross-cultural tale of two women brought together by the intersections of television and industrial agriculture, fertility and motherhood, life and love—the breakout hit by the celebrated author of A Tale for the Time Being Ruth Ozeki’s mesmerizing debut novel has captivated readers and reviewers worldwide. When documentarian Jane Takagi-Little finally lands a job producing a Japanese television show that just happens to be sponsored by an American meat-exporting business, she uncovers some unsavory truths about love, fertility, and a dangerous hormone called DES. Soon she will also cross paths with Akiko Ueno, a beleaguered Japanese housewife struggling to escape her overbearing husband. Hailed by USA Today as “rare and provocative” and awarded the Kirayama Prize for Literature of the Pacific Rim, My Year of Meats is a modern-day take on Upton Sinclair’s The Jungle for fans of Michael Pollan, Margaret Atwood, and Barbara Kingsolver.

Texas Linguistic Forum

Why are young women and men putting their literacy skills to use in the writing of
love letters ? To answer this question very briefly : Junigau marriage practices
have been changing dramatically over the past ten to fifteen yearfewer and fewer
 ...

Texas Linguistic Forum


One Hundred Women of the Rio Grande Valley of Texas

Two weeks later , she received a love letter from one of them . Estella taught at
Webber one year then transferred to Hidalgo where she taught third grade only .
During the summers , Estella continued her education at Texas A & I in Kingsville
.

One Hundred Women of the Rio Grande Valley of Texas

A salute to women who stand out as a shining example among others in her profession, business or creative talent. They range from the early 20s to past 90 years. Several of them were born in the Valley and have never lived anywhere else. Others have lived all over the world before choosing the area for their permanent home.

Texas Quarterly

His Elegies recast his lifelong needs ; in them he exalts little known women of
other times as the noblest of nature's ... a Portuguese nun ( 1640–1723 ) who
was long considered the authoress of sublime love letters to the man who had ...

Texas Quarterly


Southwestern Historical Quarterly

... Bonds : Stories by and about Modern Texas Women , by Ellen C. Temple
Bennion , Equal to the Occasion : Women Editors of the NineteenthCentury West
, by Marilyn McAdams Sibley Reeve , My Dear Mollie : Love Letters of a Texas
Sheep ...

Southwestern Historical Quarterly


Black Texas Women

A Marshall woman , Harriet Person Perry , wrote about slaves sewing for the
Confederacy . ... A few months after the letter was written ( and presumably
received ) , Norfleet disappeared from camp and made his way home from the ...
My love is just as great as the first night I married you and I hope it will be so with
you .

Black Texas Women

This book is like a time capsule of black women's history.

Publishers Weekly

Merydew , J. T. , Love Letters of Famous Men and Maillard , Texas . Women , 2
vols . London , 1888 . Book of Mormon , Kirtland . 1837 . Hints On Letter Writing .
London , about 1842 . Captivity of the Oatnian Girls . Depny's Müitary Journal .

Publishers Weekly


Texas Libraries

years , but Texas became a bestseller though Holley never became rich . She
continued writing about and promoting Texas until her death in 1846 . These
three women - Waerenskjold , Barr , and Holley — were educated daughters who
 ...

Texas Libraries

"Directory and statistics" (called -1954 "Directory of Texas libraries") issued as Apr. number, 1954-58 (Apr. 1954 as Special ed.).

Texas Quilts Texas Women

... however , and records of the times show that the majority of these women
came to love their new homes and instilled in their children a ... A letter written in
1830 by an immigrant from Virginia indicated these aspects of early life in Texas .

Texas Quilts  Texas Women

Discusses the history of quilts in Texas, looks at their role in the lives of Texas women, and includes profiles of prominent quilters

Women Culture and Community

Beginning in 1867, Mardi Gras captured the romantic imaginations of young
women fortunate enough to be invited to the masquerade ball. ... Oh! for the days
of romance once more, roses, Valentines, and love letters of poetry, gallantry,
chivalry, modesty and deference. ... Courtesy Rosenberg Library, Galveston,
Texas ...

Women  Culture  and Community

Why in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries did middle- and upper-class southern women-black and white-advance from the private worlds of home and family into public life, eventually transforming the cultural and political landscape of their community? Using Galveston as a case study, Elizabeth Hayes Turner asks who where the women who became activists and eventually led to progressive reforms and the women sufferage movement. Turner discovers that a majority of them came from particular congregations, but class status had as much to do with reofrm as did religious motivation. The Hurricane of 1900, disfranchisement of black voters, and the creation of city commission government gave white women the leverage they needed to fight for a women's agenda for the city. Meanwhile, African American women, who were excluded from open civic association with whites, created their own organizations, implemented their own goals, and turned their energies to resisting and alleviating the numbing effects of racism. Separately white and black women created their own activist communities. Together, however, they changed the face of this New South city. Based on an exhaustive database of membership in community organizations compiled by the author from local archives, Women, Culture, and Community will appeal to students of race relations in the post-Reconstruction South, women's history, and religious history.

Twenty Two Texas Women

Porter recalled that her interest in writing began at the age of six , when she wrote
what she subtitled a “ nobell . ... Her themes of love and hate in short stories
about troubled marriages and troubled families could be firsthand experiences
from ...

Twenty Two Texas Women

Biographies of women who were the first or best in their fields including business, aviation, and medicine when such professions were not considered appropriate for women.

The Portable Handbook of Texas

In 1852 , Jane Cazneau ( writing under the pseudonym Cora Montgomery )
published Eagle Pass , a vivid description of ... In 1855 Augusta Evans Wilson
published the first Texas novel by a woman , the highly sentimental and romantic
Inez ...

The Portable Handbook of Texas

Texas! It is an evocative word that brings to mind images of cowboys and Indians, Mexican vaqueros and mustangs, endless prairies and the Alamo...and today, astronauts and high tech industries, with pickup trucks and policemen on horseback reflected in glass skyscrapers. The history and mythology of Texas span many centuries and cultures: from the Tejas Indians that the Spanish conquistador Vasquez de Coronado encountered on the High Plains...to the Tejanos of South Texas...to the Texians of the fledgling republic...to the Texans of today. This richness, the layered historical panorama of past and present Texas, is the subject of the Portable Handbook of Texas.