A Networked Self and Love

We fall in love every day, with others, with ideas, with ourselves. Stories of love excite us and baffle us. This volume is about love and the networked self. It focuses on how love forms, grows, or dissolves.

A Networked Self and Love

We fall in love every day, with others, with ideas, with ourselves. Stories of love excite us and baffle us. This volume is about love and the networked self. It focuses on how love forms, grows, or dissolves. Chapters address how relationships of love develop, are sustained or broken up through technologies of expression and connection. Authors explore how technologies reproduce, reorganize, or reimagine our dominant rituals of love. Contributors also address what our experiences with love teach us about ourselves, others, and the art of living. Every love story has a beginning and an end. Technology does not give love the kiss of eternity; but it can afford love new meaning.

A Networked Self and Platforms Stories Connections

A Networked Self Each volume in this series develops and pursues a distinct theme focused on the concept of the ... Stories, Connections A Networked Self and Love A Networked Self and Birth, Life, Death A Networked Self and Human ...

A Networked Self and Platforms  Stories  Connections

We tell stories about who we are. Through telling these stories, we connect with others and affirm our own sense of self. Spaces, be they online or offline; private or public; physical, augmented or virtual; or of a hybrid nature, present the performative realms upon which our stories unfold. This volume focuses on how digital platforms support, enhance, or confine the networked self. Contributors examine a range of issues relating to storytelling, platforms, and the self, including the live-reporting of events, the curation of information, emerging modalities of journalism, collaboratively formed memories, and the instant historification of the present.

Configuring the Networked Self

They tolerated my absences, for the most part without complaint, endured my occasional grouchiness, and always made clear their unconditional love and support. PART I Locating the Networked Self CHAPTER 1 Introduction: Imagining.

Configuring the Networked Self

The legal and technical rules governing flows of information are out of balance, argues Julie E. Cohen in this original analysis of information law and policy. Flows of cultural and technical information are overly restricted, while flows of personal information often are not restricted at all. The author investigates the institutional forces shaping the emerging information society and the contradictions between those forces and the ways that people use information and information technologies in their everyday lives. She then proposes legal principles to ensure that people have ample room for cultural and material participation as well as greater control over the boundary conditions that govern flows of information to, from, and about them.

A Networked Self and Human Augmentics Artificial Intelligence Sentience

To an ad network? To the company that makes him? People who love their pets often cite companionship as one of the pleasures of the relationship. When you are out with your dog (or home with your cat) you are not alone.

A Networked Self and Human Augmentics  Artificial Intelligence  Sentience

Every new technology invites its own sets of hopes and fears, and raises as many questions as it answers revolving around the same theme: Will technology fundamentally alter the essence of what it means to be human? This volume draws inspiration from the work of the many luminaries who approach augmented, alternative forms of intelligence and consciousness. Scholars contribute their thoughts on how human augmentic technologies and artificial or sentient forms of intelligence can be used to enable, reimagine, and reorganize how we understand our selves, how we conceive the meaning of "human", and how we define meaning in our lives.

A Networked Self and Birth Life Death

The self is a property-owner, owning oneself in such a fashion that they can negotiate that property in a marketplace. ... a set of capacities— loving to cook, committed to particular gender roles and particular types of stable selves.

A Networked Self and Birth  Life  Death

We are born, live, and die with technologies. This book is about the role technology plays in sustaining narratives of living, dying, and coming to be. Contributing authors examine how technologies connect, disrupt, or help us reorganize ways of parenting and nurturing life. They further consider how technology sustains our ways of thinking and being, hopefully reconciling the distance between who we are and who we aspire to be. Finally, they address the role technology plays in helping us come to terms with death, looking at technologically enhanced memorials, online rituals of mourning, and patterns of grief enabled through technology. Ultimately, this volume is about using technology to reimagine the art of life.

A Networked Self

Five: Copying, Reposting, and Recirculating a Work or Part ofa Work for Purposes of Launching a Discussion Description: Online video contributors often copy and post a work or part of it because they love or hate it, ...

A Networked Self

A Networked Self examines self presentation and social connection in the digital age. This collection brings together new work on online social networks by leading scholars from a variety of disciplines. The focus of the volume rests on the construction of the self, and what happens to self-identity when it is presented through networks of social connections in new media environments. The volume is structured around the core themes of identity, community, and culture – the central themes of social network sites. Contributors address theory, research, and practical implications of many aspects of online social networks including self-presentation, behavioral norms, patterns and routines, social impact, privacy, class/gender/race divides, taste cultures online, uses of social networking sites within organizations, activism, civic engagement and political impact.

The Social Media Age

Bauman's notion of liquid love fits with Illouz's vision of hyperconnective modernity, although Illouz characterizes hyperconnective ... professor of communication and editor of The Networked Self and Love, takes a different stance.

The Social Media Age

We are all aware of social media and how it is seamlessly integrated into our private and public lives as everyday users, but this book aims to provide a deeper understanding of social media by asking questions about its place in our society, our culture and our economy.

Architecture and the Urban in Spanish Film

In A Networked Self and Love, Zizi Papacharissi examines the intersection of technology and romantic relationships in the twenty-first century, arguing that 'networks can only be as lively as the information and sentiments that flow ...

Architecture and the Urban in Spanish Film

This will be the first edited collection in English on urban space and architecture in Spanish popular film since 1898. Building on existing film and urban histories, this innovative volume will examine Spanish film through contemporary interdisciplinary theories of urban space, the built environment, visuality and mass culture from the industrial through to the digital age. Architecture and Urbanism in Spanish Film brings together the innovative scholarship of an international and interdisciplinary group of film, architecture and urban studies scholars thinking through the reciprocal relationship between the seventh art and the built environment. Some of the shared concerns that emerge from this volume include the ways cinema as a new technology reshaped how cities and buildings are built and inhabited since the early twentieth century; the question of the mobile gaze; films role in the shifting relationship between the private and the public; film and everyday life; monumentality and the construction of historical memory for a variety of viewing publics; the impact of the digital and the virtual on filmmaking and spectatorship. Primary readership will be those researching, teaching and studying Spanish film, international film studies, urban cultural studies, cultural studies, and architects who are interested in interdisciplinary endeavours.

Impacts of Mobile Use and Experience on Contemporary Society

Whereas, women regarded self-affirmation (to feel good) more valuable when they would like sexual actions and when ... of Jane Austen was dead; the interpersonal dynamics of mobile dating is “a networked self and love” (Worsley, 2015).

Impacts of Mobile Use and Experience on Contemporary Society

As a popular and powerful medium, mobile use has increased significantly across the world. The effects of these communication devices have not only transformed how we communicate but also how we gather and distribute information in a variety of industries including healthcare, business, and education. Impacts of Mobile Use and Experience on Contemporary Society provides cross-disciplinary research that ties together use and experience examining the transformative influence of mobile technology and how it is reshaping who we are and what we do. Featuring research that investigates the impacts on both actors and activities with topic coverage that includes academic application, economic value, and mobile learning, scholars from different disciplines from all over the world identify the crucial implications behind mobile technology. Included amongst the targeted audience are educators, policymakers, healthcare professionals, managers, academicians, researchers, and practitioners.

Emotions and Loneliness in a Networked Society

Conclusion: A Networked Self. In A Networked Self: Identity, Community, and Culture on Social Networking Sites, ed. Zizi Papacharissi. ... Love Me Tinder: Untangling Emerging Adults' Motivations for Using the Dating Application Tinder.

Emotions and Loneliness in a Networked Society

Loneliness affects quality of life, life satisfaction, and well-being, and it is associated with various health problems, both somatic and mental. This book takes an international and interdisciplinary approach to the study of loneliness, identifying and bridging the gaps in academic research on loneliness, and creating new research pathways. Focusing in particular on loneliness in the context of new and emergent communication technologies, it provides a wide range of theoretical and methodological perspectives and will contribute to the re-evaluation of the way we understand and research this contemporary global phenomenon.

Social Support and Health in the Digital Age

In A Networked Self and Love, edited by Zizi Papacharissi, 102–128. New York, NY: Routledge. Teppers, Eveline, Koen Luyckx, Theo A. Klimstra, and Luc Goossens. 2014. “Loneliness and Facebook Motives in Adolescence: A Longitudinal ...

Social Support and Health in the Digital Age

Social Support and Health in the Digital Age discusses how the information age has revolutionized nearly every facet of human communication--from the ways in which people purchase products to how they meet and fall in love. These exciting new communication technologies can both unite and divide us. People who are separated by great distances can now communicate with each other in real time, whereas parents often find themselves competing with smartphones and tablets for their children's attention. This book explores the many ways that digital communication media, such as online forums, social networking sites, and mobile applications, enhance and constrain social support in health-related contexts. We already know a great deal about how the Internet has altered how people search for health information, but less about how people seek and receive social support in this new age of information, which is critical for maintaining our physical, mental, and emotional wellbeing.

Digital Anthropology

In A Networked Self and Love. Ed. Z. Papacharissi. 1st ed., 12–30. New York: Routledge. Golub A, Lingley K. 2008. “Just like the Qing empire”: Internet addiction, MMOGs, and moral crisis in contemporary China.

Digital Anthropology

Digital Anthropology, 2nd Edition explores how human and digital can be explored in relation to one another within issues as diverse as social media use, virtual worlds, hacking, quantified self, blockchain, digital environmentalism and digital representation. The book challenges the prevailing moral universal of “the digital age” by exploring emergent anxieties about the global spread of new technological forms, the cultural qualities of digital experience, critically examining the intersection of the digital to new concepts and practices across a wide range of fields from design to politics. In this fully revised edition, Digital Anthropology reveals how the intense scrutiny of ethnography can overturn assumptions about the impact of digital culture and reveal its profound consequences for everyday life around the world. Combining case studies with theoretical discussion in an engaging style that conveys a passion for new frontiers of enquiry within anthropological study, this will be essential reading for students and scholars interested in theory of anthropology, media and information studies, communication studies and sociology. With a brand-new Introduction from editors Haidy Geismar and Hannah Knox, as well as an abridged version of the original Introduction by Heather Horst and Daniel Miller, in conjunction with new chapters on hacking and digitizing environments, amongst others, and fully revised chapters throughout, this will bring the field-defining overview of digital anthropology fully up to date.

Smartphones within Psychological Science

Break-ups and the limits of encoding love. In Z. Papacharissi (ed.), A Networked Self and Love (pp. 113–128). Routledge. Hogg, M. A. & Vaughan, G. (2005). Introduction to Social Psychology. Pearson. Holt-Lunstad, J., Smith, T. B., ...

Smartphones within Psychological Science

Find out how the common smartphone is challenging and transforming psychological science.

Digital Existence

On Love and Touch: The Radical Haptics of Gestational Surrogacy. In: Z. Papacharissi, ed. A Networked Self and Love. New York: Routledge, 213–229. Smolicki, J., 2017. Para-Archives: Rethinking Personal Archiving Practices in the Times ...

Digital Existence

Digital Existence: Ontology, Ethics and Transcendence in Digital Culture advances debates on digital culture and digital religion in two complementary ways. First, by focalizing the themes ‘ontology,’ ‘ethics’ and ‘transcendence,’ it builds on insights from research on digital religion in order to reframe the field and pursue an existential media analysis that further pushes beyond the mandatory focus in mainstream media studies on the social, cultural, political and economic dimensions of digitalization. Second, the collection also implies a broadening of the scope of the debate in the field of media, religion and culture – and digital religion in particular – beyond ‘religion,’ to include the wider existential dimensions of digital media. It is the first volume on our digital existence in the budding field of existential media studies.

Intersectional Automations

In A Networked Self and Love, edited by Zizi Papacharissi, 173–188. New York: Routledge. Karppi, Tero, Marc Bölen, and Yvette Granata. 2016. “Killer Robots as Cultural Techniques.” International Journal of Cultural Studies, ...

Intersectional Automations

Intersectional Automations explores a range of situations where robotics, biotechnological enhancement, artificial intelligence (AI), and algorithmic culture collide with intersectional social justice issues such as race, class, gender, sexuality, ability, and citizenship. As robots, machine learning applications, and human augmentics are artifacts of human culture, they sometimes carry stereotypes, biases, exclusions, and other forms of privilege into their computational logics, platforms, and/or embodiments. The essays in this multidisciplinary collection consider how questions of equity and social justice impact our understanding of these developments, analyzing not only the artifacts themselves, but also the discourses and practices surrounding them, including societal understandings, design choices, law and policy approaches, and their uses and abuses.

McQuail s Media and Mass Communication Theory

(2018a) A Networked Self: Birth, Life, Death. Abingdon: Routledge. Papacharissi, Z. (ed.) (2018b) A Networked Self: Human Augmentics, Artificial Intelligence, Sentience. Abingdon: Routledge. ... (2018c) A Networked Self: Love.

McQuail   s Media and Mass Communication Theory

Now in its seventh edition, this landmark text continues to define the field of media and mass communication research, offering a uniquely detailed, broad, and balanced guide. It maintains the narrative into the world of pervasive, ubiquitous, mobile, social and always-online media that we live in today. New to this edition: • Examples are now integrated within each chapter around politics and the public sphere, as popular culture and politics become more regularly intertwined. • An increased focus on conceptualizing ‘mass’ media and communication and media theory in an age of big data, such as algorithmic culture, AI, platform economies, streaming, and mass self-communication. • Further discussion of what we want and expect of media and society in all chapters. • New and revised material, including a new chapter “A Canon of Media Effects”, bringing together Social-Cultural Effects & News, Public Opinion and Political Communication, helping the reader to rethink and reframe the whole idea of media effects and influence. A vitally important for all students of Media and Mass Communication in the 21st century.

Dislike Minded

A Reflection on Personal Trauma, Networked Play, and Ethical Sight.” In A Networked Self and Love, ed. Zizi Papacharissi, 202–12. New York: Routledge. Proctor, William, and Bridget Kies. 2018a. “Editors' Introduction: On Toxic Fan ...

Dislike Minded

Explains why audiences dislike certain media and what happens when they do The study and discussion of media is replete with talk of fans, loves, stans, likes, and favorites, but what of dislikes, distastes, and alienation? Dislike-Minded draws from over two-hundred qualitative interviews to probe what the media’s failures, wounds, and sore spots tell us about media culture, taste, identity, representation, meaning, textuality, audiences, and citizenship. The book refuses the simplicity of Pierre Bourdieu’s famous dictum that dislike is (only) snobbery. Instead, Jonathan Gray pushes onward to uncover other explanations for what it ultimately means to dislike specific artifacts of television, film, and other media, and why this dislike matters. As we watch and listen through gritted teeth, Dislike-Minded listens to what is being said, and presents a bold case for a new line of audience research within communication, media, and cultural studies.

Peer Pedagogies on Digital Platforms

Papacharissi Zizi . 2015. Affective Publics : Sentiment , Technology , and Politics . Oxford : Oxford University Press . Papacharissi , Zizi . 2018. A Networked Self and Love . New York : Routledge . Papert , Seymour . 1980.

Peer Pedagogies on Digital Platforms

How a popular entertainment genre on YouTube--Let's Play videos created by Minecraft players--offers opportunities for children to learn from their peers. Every day millions of children around the world watch video gameplay on YouTube in the form of a popular entertainment genre known as Let's Play videos. These videos, which present a player's gameplay and commentary, offer children opportunities for interaction and learning not available in traditional television viewing or solo video gameplay. In this book, Michael Dezuanni examines why Let's Play videos are so appealing to children, looking in particular at videos of Minecraft gameplay. He finds that a significant aspect of the popularity of these videos is the opportunity for knowledge and skill exchange.

Production of the Self in the Digital Age

Self-love is seen as inducing self-destruction and madness, highlighting the fatal flaw in the human condition. ... public and private spaces with multiple audiences, enabling a networked self to emerge (Papacharissi 2011: 304–305).

Production of the  Self  in the Digital Age

This book investigates the relationship between the self and screen in the digital age, and examines how the notion of the self is re-negotiated and curated online. The chapters examine the production of the self in postmodernity through digital platforms by employing key concepts of ubiquity, the everyday, disembodiment and mortality. It locates self-production through ubiquitous imaging of the self and our environments with and through mobile technologies and in terms of its ‘embeddedness’ in our everyday lives. In this innovative text, Yasmin Ibrahim explores technology’s co-location on our corporeal body, our notions of domesticity and banality, our renewed relationship with the screen and our enterprise with capital as well as the role of desire in the formation of the self. The result is a richly interdisciplinary volume that seeks to examine the formation of the self online, through its renewed negotiations with personalised technologies and with the emergence of social networking sites.

The Global Smartphone

A Networked Self: Identity, community, and culture on social network sites. London: Taylor and Francis. Papacharissi, Zizi. 2018. A Networked Self and Love. London: Taylor and Francis. Pariser, Eli. 2012. The Filter Bubble: What the ...

The Global Smartphone

The smartphone is often literally right in front of our nose, so you would think we would know what it is. But do we? To find out, 11 anthropologists each spent 16 months living in communities in Africa, Asia, Europe and South America, focusing on the take up of smartphones by older people. Their research reveals that smartphones are technology for everyone, not just for the young. The Global Smartphone presents a series of original perspectives deriving from this global and comparative research project. Smartphones have become as much a place within which we live as a device we use to provide ‘perpetual opportunism’, as they are always with us. The authors show how the smartphone is more than an ‘app device’ and explore differences between what people say about smartphones and how they use them. The smartphone is unprecedented in the degree to which we can transform it. As a result, it quickly assimilates personal values. In order to comprehend it, we must take into consideration a range of national and cultural nuances, such as visual communication in China and Japan, mobile money in Cameroon and Uganda, and access to health information in Chile and Ireland – all alongside diverse trajectories of ageing in Al Quds, Brazil and Italy. Only then can we know what a smartphone is and understand its consequences for people’s lives around the world.