A Novel Journal: The Picture of Dorian Gray (Compact)

A Novel Journal: The Picture of Dorian Gray (Compact)

Adorn the lines of this classic cautionary tale with fresh insights of your own. Published in 1890, The Picture of Dorian Gray is Oscar Wilde’s only novel, and at first, it was considered too salacious to publish. In this story of greed, sin, and arrogance, a young, handsome man makes a devil’s bargain to have his portrait age instead of his body. A cautionary tale of innocence sacrificed for the sake of vanity, The Picture of Dorian Gray is a time-honored story that remains relevant today. In A Novel Journal: The Picture of Dorian Gray, the famously insightful novel serves as the lines of this journal in tiny type. With this journal in hand, writers can rest assured that the pages are graced with greatness and write with abandon, whether they use Wilde’s words as inspiration for their own unique stories or simply enjoy the reminder of his classic each time they sit down to write. Packaged with a deluxe Svepa cover, brilliant endpapers, colored edges, and matching elastic band to close pages tight, this book is a great gift or collectible for admirers of Wilde’s work. And the compact size makes this journal easy to slip into a purse, briefcase, or backpack so you can record and revisit your thoughts on the go.

The Picture of Dorian Gray and Three Stories

The Picture of Dorian Gray and Three Stories

A fashionable young man sells his soul for eternal youth and beauty in Oscar Wilde's fascinating gothic tale. The Picture of Dorian Gray, Oscar Wilde’s only full-length novel, is the enduringly eerie story of a naïve and irresistible young man lured by decadent Lord Henry Wotton into a life of depravity. Though Dorian is steeped in sin, his face remains perfect, unlined as years pass—while only his portrait, locked away, reveals the blackness of his soul. This timeless tale of Gothic horror and fable, reveling in the unabashed hedonism and cynical wit of its characters, epitomizes Wilde’s literary revolt against the proprieties of the Victorian era. Sharing this volume with The Picture of Dorian Gray are Wilde’s clever and sophisticated story “Lord Arthur Savile’s Crime” and two of his delicate fairy tales, “The Happy Prince” and “The Birthday of the Infanta.” With an Introduction by Gary Schnidgall and an Afterword by Peter Raby

The Uncensored Picture of Dorian Gray

The Uncensored Picture of Dorian Gray

Over 120 years after Oscar Wilde submitted The Picture of Dorian Gray for publication, the uncensored version of his novel appears here for the first time in a paperback edition. This volume restores material, including instances of graphic homosexual content, removed by the novel’s first editor, who feared it would be “offensive” to Victorians.

Wilde Passions of Dorian Gray

A Novel

Wilde Passions of Dorian Gray

Inspired by Oscar Wilde’s classic novel The Picture of Dorian Gray, Mitzi Szereto’s Wilde Passions of Dorian Gray continues where Wilde left off with the Faustian tale of a man of eternal youth and great physical beauty who lives a life of corruption, decadence and hedonism. The story begins in the bordellos of Jazz-Age Paris, moving to the opium dens of Marrakesh and the alluring anonymity of South America. In his pursuit of sensation and carnal thrills, Dorian’s desires turn increasingly extreme and he leaves behind yet more devastation and death. He ultimately settles in present-day New Orleans, joining with a group of like-minded beings known as The Night People. They inadvertently return to Dorian his humanity when he falls in love with a young woman he rescues from becoming their victim. She will be his redemption, but she will also be his final curse.

The Culture of Yellow

Or, The Visual Politics of Late Modernity

The Culture of Yellow

This is the first book to explore the cultural significance of the color yellow, showing how its psychological and aesthetic value marked and shaped many of the intellectual, political, and artistic currents of late modernity. It contends that yellow functions during this period primarily as a color of stigma and scandal. Yellow stigmatization has had a long history: it goes back to the Middle Ages when Jews and prostitutes were forced to wear yellow signs to emphasize their marginal status. Although scholars have commented on these associations in particular contexts, Sabine Doran offers the first overarching account of how yellow connects disparate cultural phenomena, such as turn-of-the-century decadence (the "yellow nineties"), the rise of mass media ("yellow journalism"), mass immigration from Asia ("the yellow peril"), and mass stigmatization (the yellow star that Jews were forced to wear in Nazi Germany). The Culture of Yellow combines cultural history with innovative readings of literary texts and visual artworks, providing a multilayered account of the unique role played by the color yellow in late nineteenth- and twentieth-century American and European culture.

The Picture of Dorian Gray

Includes Fresh-squeezed Mla Style Citations

The Picture of Dorian Gray

Each title in Squid Ink Classics' Electric Orange Book Collection includes the full text of the work plus fresh-squeezed MLA style citations for scholarly secondary sources, peer-reviewed journal articles and critical essays.

The Heart of Thoreau's Journals

The Heart of Thoreau's Journals

The conflict between scientific observation and poetry, reflections on abolition, transcendental philosophy, other concerns are explored in this superb general selection from Thoreau's voluminous Journal.

Setting the Record Queer

Rethinking Oscar Wilde's »The Picture of Dorian Gray« and Virginia Woolf's »Mrs. Dalloway«

Setting the Record Queer

»To define is to limit«, Lord Henry states, and Mrs. Dalloway »would not say of anyone [...] that they were this or that«. Why then are the respective novels mostly read - and in recent adaptations rewritten - in denial of their genuinely ambiguous designs? Bringing the two literary classics together for the first time, their shared concerns regarding textual and sexual identities are revealed. Challenging an established critical record commonly related to Oscar Wilde's and Virginia Woolf's own mythologised biographies, this study underscores the value of constantly rethinking labels by liberating the texts from the limiting grip of categorical readings.

Bram Stoker's Dracula

A Reader's Guide

Bram Stoker's Dracula

Dracula (1897) is one of the most commonly studied gothic novels and has been hugely influential through adaptations in fiction, on stage and in cinema. Offering an authoritative, up-to-date guide for students, this book introduces its context, language, themes, criticism and afterlife, leading students to a more sophisticated understanding of the text. It is the ideal guide to reading and studying the novel, setting Dracula in its historical, intellectual and cultural contexts, offering analyses of its themes, style and structure, providing exemplary close readings, presenting an up-to-date account of its critical reception. It also includes an introduction to its substantial history as an adapted text on stage and screen, focusing on the portrayal of the vampire from Nosferatu to Interview with a Vampire. It includes points for discussion, suggestions for further study and an annotated guide to relevant reading.

Literary Passports

The Making of Modernist Hebrew Fiction in Europe

Literary Passports

Literary Passports is the first book to explore modernist Hebrew fiction in Europe in the early decades of the twentieth century. It not only serves as an introduction to this important body of literature, but also acts as a major revisionist statement, freeing this literature from a Zionist-nationalist narrative and viewing it through the wider lens of new comparative studies in modernism. The book's central claim is that modernist Hebrew prose-fiction, as it emerged from 1900 to 1930, was shaped by the highly charged encounter of traditionally educated Jews with the revolution of European literature and culture known as modernism. The book deals with modernist Hebrew fiction as an urban phenomenon, explores the ways in which the genre dealt with issues of sexuality and gender, and examines its depictions of the complex relations between tradition, modernity, and religion.