Spenser Studies

Spenser Studies


Literary Research and the British Renaissance and Early Modern Period

See Spenser Studies: A Renaissance Poetry Annual Steggle, Matthew, Early Modern Literary Studies Electronic Texts, 300, 304 Stephens, Meic, The New Companion to the Literature of Wales, 32, 34 Stevens, David, English Renaissance Theatre ...

Literary Research and the British Renaissance and Early Modern Period

This guide provides the best practices and reference resources, both print and electronic, that can be used in conducting research on literature of the British Renaissance and Early Modern Period. This volume seeks to address specific research characteristics integral to studying the period, including a more inclusive canon and the predominance of Shakespeare.

A Companion to the Global Renaissance

Bednarz, James P. “Ralegh in Spenser's Historical Allegory,” Spenser Studies: A Renaissance Poetry Annual 4 (1983): 49–70. Berger, Harry. The Allegorical Temper: Vision and Reality in Book II of Spenser's “Faerie Queene,” New Haven: ...

A Companion to the Global Renaissance

Featuring twenty one newly-commissioned essays, A Companion to the Global Renaissance: English Literature and Culture in the Era of Expansion demonstrates how today's globalization is the result of a complex and lengthy historical process that had its roots in England's mercantile and cross-cultural interactions of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. An innovative collection that interrogates the global paradigm of our period and offers a new history of globalization by exploring its influences on English culture and literature of the early modern period. Moves beyond traditional notions of Renaissance history mainly as a revival of antiquity and presents a new perspective on England's mercantile and cross-cultural interactions with the New and Old Worlds of the Americas, Africa, and the East, as well with Northern Europe. Illustrates how twentieth-century globalization was the result of a lengthy and complex historical process linked to the emergence of capitalism and colonialism Explores vital topics such as East-West relations and Islam; visual representations of cultural 'others'; gender and race struggles within the new economies and cultures; global drama on the cosmopolitan English stage, and many more

John Donne and Contemporary Poetry

On Spenser and modern poetry, see Joseph Loewenstein, “The Poets''s Poet's Poet: James Merrill's Spenser Lectures,” Spenser Studies: A Renaissance Poetry Annual 28 (2013), 65–82; William Blissett, “'Who Knows Not Colin Clout?

John Donne and Contemporary Poetry

This collection of poems and essays by both poets and scholars explores how John Donne’s writing has entered into the language, the imagination, and the navigation of erotic and spiritual desires and experiences of twentieth- and twenty-first-century writers. The chapters chart a winding path from a description of the Donne and Contemporary Poetry Project at Fordham University to an encounter with the Holy Sonnets to a set of modern holy sonnets and then through the work of a poet who used Donne’s Devotions on Emergent Occasions to chart his own dying. There are further poems on sickness and recovery, an essay on Donne and disease that brings in the work of an Australian poet, and several chapters of poems with various Donnean echoes. Of the final four chapters, one places Donne in relation to another poet and one to the Psalms, followed by two chapters on Donne’s speech figures and his poetics.

Literary and visual Ralegh

Spenser Studies: A Renaissance Poetry Annual XV (2001): 185–96. Demaray, John G. From Pilgrimage to History: The Renaissance and Global Historicism. New York: AMS Press, 2006. 250pp. Dillard, R. H. W. 'The Elizabethan Novels: Death of ...

Literary and visual Ralegh

This collection of essays by scholars from Great Britain, the United States, Canada and Taiwan covers a wide range of topics about Ralegh's diversified career and achievements. Some of the essays shed light on less familiar facets such as Ralegh as a father and as he is represented in paintings, statues, and in movies; others re-examine him as poet, historian, as a controversial figure in Ireland during Elizabeth's reign, and look at his complex relationship with and patronage of Edmund Spenser. A recurrent topic is the Hatfield Manuscript in Ralegh's handwriting, which contains his long, unfinished poem 'The Ocean to Cynthia', usually considered a lament about his rejection by Queen Elizabeth after she learned of his secret marriage to one of her ladies-in-waiting. The book is appropriate for students of Elizabethan-Jacobean history and literature. Among the contributors are well-known scholars of Ralegh and his era, including James Nohrenberg, Anna Beer, Thomas Herron, Alden Vaughan and Andrew Hiscock.

2015 U S Higher Education Faculty Awards Vol 1

Explorations in Renaissance Culture 30 (Summer 2004):89–109 “Fashioning Gender: Cross-Dressing in Spenser's Legend of Britomart and Artegall.” Spenser Studies: A Renaissance Poetry Annual 15 (2001): 95–119.

2015 U S  Higher Education Faculty Awards  Vol  1

FacultyAwards.org is the first and only university awards program in the United States based on faculty peer evaluation. Faculty Awards was created to recognize outstanding faculty members (as viewed by their Faculty peers) at colleges and universities across the United States. Faculty members voted through the 2014-2015 academic year for their peers at their academic departments and schools within a number of categories. Access to FacultyAwards.org to nominate and vote for Faculty was limited to university professors or faculty members at accredited U.S. institution of higher education. Faculty members were nominated and voted for by other faculty members in their own academic departments and schools. We strove to maintain an accurate peer-review process. Voting was not open to students or the public at large. In addition, faculty members voted for educators only at their own college or university. Winners for the 2014-2015 academic year, in all departments and colleges across U.S. institutions of higher education were announced in March 2015 and are permanently archived at FacultyAwards.org, as well as recognized in this 2015 print edition of the Faculty Awards Compendium. For the academic year 2014-2015 votes were cast to nominate and vote for Faculty members, and no self-voting was allowed, to assure the integrity of the whole process. This volume of the Faculty Awards Compendium includes Faculty awardees within Fine Arts, Humanities, Liberal Arts and Social Sciences Disciplines for the 2014-2015 academic year. A total of 1608 winning Faculty members in 584 higher education institutions were determined after tallying the votes. We would like to thank all Faculty members who participated in the voting process and to wish all the Faculty awardees continued success in their academic endeavors. We look forward to resuming the voting process for the 2015-2016 academic year awards.

The Shaping of English Poetry

See Jean R. Brink , Constructing the View of the Present State of Ireland ' , Spenser Studies XI : A Renaissance Poetry Annual , edited by Patrick Cullen and Thomas P. Roche , Jr ( New York : AMS Press , Inc. , 1994 ) , pp . 203–28 .

The Shaping of English Poetry

This collection of essays is conceived not as a summary of past endeavours but as the beginning of an attempt to present a sense of the wholeness of a distinctively English literature from Beowulf to Spenser. The native alliterative tradition of England is represented by its final flowering in two essays on Sir Gawain and the Green Knight and three on Piers Plowman. The renewal of English letters in the fourteenth century, inspired by continental models in French and Italian, is represented by four essays on Chaucer. The poetic achievement of these three medieval masters remains unmatched until Spenser announces himself in a third great age in the history of English poetry and this is represented by three essays on the first three books of The Faerie Queene. Spenser's indebtedness to Langland and Chaucer, and his philosophical conservatism in drawing on the thought of Aristotle and the tradition of medieval commentary surrounding the works of Aristotle, ensure that the tradition of English poetry in the Renaissance is securely rooted in its medieval inheritance.

Cultural Semiotics Spenser and the Captive Woman

Spenser Studies : A Renaissance Poetry Annual 1 ( 1980 ) : 95–106 . King , John N. Spenser's Poetry and the Reformation Tradition . Princeton : Princeton University Press , 1990 . Knapp , Steven , and Walter Benn Michaels .

Cultural Semiotics  Spenser  and the Captive Woman

"In Cultural Semiotics, Spenser, and the Captive Woman, author Louise Schleiner uses concepts from A. J. Greimas to analyze The Shepheardes Calender (1579) as a discourse and as a definitive text for the Elizabethan "political unconscious," in the sense of Fredric Jameson, who also drew on Greimas. The book demonstrates sociolinguistic patterns at work in Elizabethan ideological conflicts, at a level that shows how those patterns were related to the energies of people's sexuality and their political and religious commitments. Through explaining this libidinal and political functioning of the Calender, in its time and for Spenser as a new poet, the book identifies an "ideologeme," widely observable in England of the 1580s and 1590s: that of the captive/capturing woman, a unit of interfactional and interclass discourse." "As well as discussing Spenser, two chapters include examples from music and balladry and use the "captive woman" construct to analyze material from such figures as Lyly, Shakespeare, the composer John Dowland, the Countess of Pembroke, and Queen Elizabeth I. A concluding chapter on the Calender's proferred text-readership game shows Spenser evolving his ordering of the twelve eclogues through inventing a strategic frame for them, an implied story that both celebrates and leaves behind his passionate friendship with Gabriel Harvey."--BOOK JACKET.Title Summary field provided by Blackwell North America, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Emotional Settings in Early Modern Pedagogical Culture

Education in Renaissance England. London and Toronto: Routledge and K. Paul, Univ. of Toronto, 1965. Print. Dolven, Jeffrey. “The Method of Spenser's Stanza.” Spenser Studies: A Renaissance Poetry Annual 19 (2004): 17–25. Web. ——–.

Emotional Settings in Early Modern Pedagogical Culture

This book is notable for bringing together humanist schooling and familial instruction under the banner of emotions and for studying seminal works of early modern literature within this new analytical context. It thus furnishes unique ways to think about two closely interrelated moral imperatives: shaping boys into civil subjects; and fashioning heroic agency and selfhood in literature. In tracing the emotional dynamics of the humanist classroom, this book shows just how thoroughly school could accommodate resistance to authority and foster unruly boys. In gauging the emotional pressures at work in filial relationships, it shows how profoundly sons could experience patriarchal authority as provisional, negotiable, or damaging. In turning to Shakespeare’s Hamlet, Spenser’s Prince Arthur, and Sidney’s Arcadian heroes, Emotional Settings highlights the ways in which the respective emotional and moral imperatives of home and school could bring conflicting pressures to bear in the formation of heroic agency – and at what cost. Engaging and accessible, this book will appeal to scholars interested in early modern literature, pedagogy, histories of emotion, and histories of the family, as well as to graduate students and advanced undergraduate students in these fields.

Time and the Calendar in Edmund Spenser s Poetical Works

Spenser Studies: A Renaissance Poetry Annual 4 (1983). ... “The Circular Argument of The Shepheardes Calender.” In Logan, Gordon Teskey, and Northrop Frye, eds. Unfolded Tales: Essays in Renaissance Romance. Ithaca: Cornell UP, 1989.

Time and the Calendar in Edmund Spenser s Poetical Works


The Poem and the Garden in Early Modern England

Spenser Studies: A Renaissance Poetry Annual 8 (1987): 79–100. Nichols, Rose Standish. English Pleasure Gardens. Boston: David R. Godine, 2003. Nicholson, Catherine. “Commonplace Shakespeare: Value, Vulgarity, and the Poetics of ...

The Poem and the Garden in Early Modern England

This book draws attention to the pervasive artistic rivalry between Elizabethan poetry and gardens in order to illustrate the benefits of a trans-media approach to the literary culture of the period. In its blending of textual studies with discussions of specific historical patches of earth, The Poem and the Garden demonstrates how the fashions that drove poetic invention were as likely to be influenced by a popular print convention or a particular garden experience as they were by the formal genres of the classical poets. By moving beyond a strictly verbal approach in its analysis of creative imitation, this volume offers new ways of appreciating the kinds of comparative and competitive methods that shaped early modern poetics. Noting shared patterns—both conceptual and material—in these two areas not only helps explain the persistence of botanical metaphors in sixteenth-century books of poetry but also offers a new perspective on the types of contrastive illusions that distinguish the Elizabethan aesthetic. With its interdisciplinary approach, The Poem and the Garden is of interest to all students and scholars who study early modern poetics, book history, and garden studies.

Sidney s Poetics

Spenser Studies: A Renaissance Poetry Annual 8 (1987): 239-49. . "Spenser, Sidney, and Poetic Form." Studies in Philology 88 (1991): 140-52. . Touches of Sweet Harmony: Pythagorean Cosmology and Renaissance Poetics. San Marino, Calif.

Sidney s Poetics

Sidney's Poetics is essential reading not only for students and scholars of Renaissance literature and literary theory but also for all who want to understand how human beings write and read creatively.

A Reference Guide for English Studies

University Park : Pennsylvania State University Press , 1942– . 4 / yr . Reviews . Bibliography ( see O - 9 ) . PR1.347 Spenser Studies : A Renaissance Poetry Annual ( see M – 60 ) . SEL SEL : Studies in English Literature , 1500–1900 .

A Reference Guide for English Studies

This ambitious undertaking is designed to acquaint students, teachers, and researchers with reference sources in any branch of English studies, which Marcuse defines as "all those subjects and lines of critical and scholarly inquiry presently pursued by members of university departments of English language and literature.'' Within each of 24 major sections, Marcuse lists and annotates bibliographies, guides, reviews of research, encyclopedias, dictionaries, journals, and reference histories. The annotations and various indexes are models of clarity and usefulness, and cross references are liberally supplied where appropriate. Although cost-conscious librarians will probably consider the several other excellent literary bibliographies in print, such as James L. Harner's Literary Research Guide (Modern Language Assn. of America, 1989), larger academic libraries will want Marcuse's volume.-- Jack Bales, Mary Washington Coll. Lib., Fredericksburg, Va. -Library Journal.

Printers without Borders

Spenser Studies: A Renaissance Poetry Annual 16 (2002): 55–75. “Spenser's Allusion to the Defeat of the Spanish Armada in Virgil's Gnat (550–92).” Spenser Studies: A Renaissance Poetry Annual 19 (2004): 239–244. Arena, Antoine de.

Printers without Borders

This innovative study shows how printing and translation transformed English literary culture in the Renaissance. Focusing on the century after Caxton brought the press to England in 1476, Coldiron illustrates the foundational place of foreign, especially French language, materials. The book reveals unexpected foreign connections between works as different as Caxton's first printed translations, several editions of Book of the Courtier, sixteenth-century multilingual poetry, and a royal Armada broadside. Demonstrating a new way of writing literary history beyond source-influence models, the author treats the patterns and processes of translation and printing as co-transformations. This provocative book will interest scholars and advanced students of book history, translation studies, comparative literature and Renaissance literature.

Self Speaking in Medieval and Early Modern English Drama

Spenser Studies: A Renaissance Poetry Annual 10 (1989): 1–35. Hillman, Richard. 'Everyman and the Energies of Stasis'. Florilegium (Carleton University Annual Papers on Classical Antiquity and the Middle Ages) 7 (1985): 206–26. —.

Self Speaking in Medieval and Early Modern English Drama

This book documents the changing representation of subjectivity in Medieval and Early Modern English drama by intertextually exploring discourses of 'self-speaking', including soliloquy. Pre-modern ideas about language are combined with recent models of subject formation, especially Lacan's, to theorize and analyze the stage 'self' as a variable linguistic construct. Both the approach itself and the conclusions it generates significantly diverge from the standard New Historicist/Cultural Materialist narrative of subjectivity. Plays range from the Corpus Christi pageants to the Beaumont and Fletcher canon, with Shakespeare a recurrent focus and Hamlet, inevitably, the pivotal text.

Elizabethan Silent Language

In Spenser Studies : A Renaissance Poetry Annual , ed . Patrick Cullen and Thomas P. Roche Jr. Pittsburgh : U of Pittsburgh P , 1980. I : 29-67 . “ The Illustrations to The Sheapherdes Calender . ” In Spenser Studies : A Renaissance ...

Elizabethan Silent Language

Elizabethan Silent Language is an anatomy of an alternative or supplementary mode of communication in a culture prized for its literary contributions. Through the use of nonverbal media, Elizabethans coexpressed, enhanced, andøsometimes even subverted the medium of the written or spoken word. Besides written documents and works of art, extant material reveals new referents and deeper meaning for Elizabethan verbal expression. Funeral monuments, jewelry, costume, foodstuffs, protocol, sumptuary laws, portraits, architecture, management of public appearance, absence, and silence?all were forms of a silent language. The main elements of the semantic system of Elizabethan silent language were in many cases those of literal language, with resources in religion, in antiquity as translated through humanist tradition, in custom and law, in the Continental Renaissance, and in Tudor historiography?syntactic elements translated through word and practice and subject to personal inflection. Assumed as given values were the masculine norm, young adulthood, courtly service, discernment of ethical and aesthetic dimensions in all aspects of life, a comprehensive rule of decorum, and the preservation of religious, political, and social hierarchy. Elizabethan Silent Language is a unique book. Although Renaissance scholars have focused their attention on individual components of texts, such as ceremony, costume, architecture, protocol, and portrait, no other source synthesizes these components.

Making the Miscellany

Spenser Studies: A Renaissance Poetry Annual 27 (2012): 249–87. Roberts, Sasha. Reading Shakespeare's Poems in Early Modern England. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2003. Roche, Thomas P., Jr. Petrarch and the English Sonnet Sequences.

Making the Miscellany

In Making the Miscellany Megan Heffernan examines the poetic design of early modern printed books and explores how volumes of compiled poems, which have always existed in practice, responded to media change in sixteenth- and seventeenth-century England. Heffernan's focus is not only the material organization of printed poetry, but also how those conventions and innovations of arrangement contributed to vernacular poetic craft, the consolidation of ideals of individual authorship, and centuries of literary history. The arrangement of printed compilations contains a largely unstudied and undertheorized archive of poetic form, Heffernan argues. In an evolving system of textual transmission, compilers were experimenting with how to contain individual poems within larger volumes. By paying attention to how they navigated and shaped the exchanges between poems and their organization, she reveals how we can witness the basic power of imaginative writing over the material text. Making the Miscellany is also a study of how this history of textual design has been differently told by the distinct disciplines of bibliography or book history and literary studies, each of which has handled—and obscured—the formal qualities of early modern poetry compilations and the practices that produced them. Revisiting these editorial and critical approaches, this book recovers a moment when compilers, poets, and readers were alert to a poetics of organization that exceeded the limits of the individual poem.

The Poem s Two Bodies

... Language Association Philological Quarterly Spenser Newsletter Spenser Studies: A Renaissance Poetry Annual Texas Studies in Language and Literature University of Toronto Quarterly The Poem's Two Bodies Whatever may be their use in.

The Poem s Two Bodies

The role of the human body as a poetic and ideological construct in the 1590 Faerie Queene provides the point of departure for David Lee Miller's richly detailed treatment of Spenser's allegory. In this major contribution to the study of Renaissance literature and ideology, Miller finds the poem organized by a fantasy of bodily wholeness that, like the marriage of Arthur and Gloriana, is both anticipated and deferred in the text. Originally published in 1988. The Princeton Legacy Library uses the latest print-on-demand technology to again make available previously out-of-print books from the distinguished backlist of Princeton University Press. These editions preserve the original texts of these important books while presenting them in durable paperback and hardcover editions. The goal of the Princeton Legacy Library is to vastly increase access to the rich scholarly heritage found in the thousands of books published by Princeton University Press since its founding in 1905.

Shakespeare s Poems and Sonnets

“Babbling Will in Shakespeare's Sonnets 127 to 154.” In Spenser Studies: A Renaissance Poetry Annual I. Pittsburgh: University of Pittsburgh Press, 1980. Dubrow, Heather. Captive Victors: Shakespeare's Narrative Poems and Sonnets.

Shakespeare s Poems and Sonnets

Provides insight into the poems & sonnets of William Shakespeare along with a brief biography.

The White Horse and Other Stories

Renaissance Self - Fashioning : From More to Shakespeare . Chicago : University of Chicago Press ... Hale , John R. The Art of War and Renaissance England . ... Spenser Studies : A Renaissance Poetry Annual 8 ( 1990 ) : 335-42 .

 The White Horse  and Other Stories

"This is a collection of stories by Emilia Pardo Bazan (1851-1921), a Spanish author who often found the subject matter of her stories in the mysteries and vicissitudes of life. Some of her tales are fictional accounts of actual occurrences or people ("The Pardon," "A Galician Mother," and "The Lady Bandit"); others are a defense of women subjugated by a double standard ("The Guilty Woman" and "The Faithful Fiancee"); a number focus on the figure of the rural priest ("A Descendant of the Cid" and "Don Carmelo's Salvation," for example). One highly symbolic story - "The White Horse" - qualifies Pardo Bazan as the godmother of the Generation of 98, the group of writers who exhorted Spain to begin anew, ridding itself of inertia, apathy, and fixation on past glories. Several of the collected tales are like contemporary suspense thrillers (such as "The Cuff Link" and "The White Hair"), while many others reveal a keen psychological insight ("The Torn Lace," "The Substitute," "Scissors," "The Nurse," and "Rescue"). Pardo Bazan's themes are fear, love, hatred, forgiveness, cruelty, poverty, necrophilia, repentance, homesickness, and madness - that is, naked reality, bitter reality, and often an ugly, vicious reality." "One of the indisputable giants of the nineteenth-century short story is Guy de Maupassant. Pardo Bazan met him (along with Daudet and Zola) in France and considered him - author of "The Horla" - to be the master of short story writers. However, although Maupassant influenced her (most notably in psychological inquiry and careful attention to realistic detail), Pardo Bazan put her own stamp on her stories and developed a style sui generis, the most striking feature of which is brevity." "The essence of Pardo Bazan's approach is to engage the reader as quickly as possible, certainly in the first paragraph, frequently in the first few sentences. Some aspect of a character or an episode is brought to light and the story unfolds rapidly. There are third-person narratives in which the author occasionally injects herself or her point of view. Other narratives are presented wholly in the first person - some by an omniscient narrator, some by the "players"; and, from time to time, Pardo Bazan has someone else tell the story to her, and then as narrator she becomes the audience." "It is entirely plausible that some of her graphic descriptions were intended to blunt accusations of softness (i.e., femininity) that in her era would - foolishly, but automatically - have been associated with a woman writer. Still, when the time came to represent the plight of women - in terms of natural, understandable sexual needs and intellectual acceptance - Pardo Bazan captured the anguish and inferior status of her Spanish sisters."--BOOK JACKET.Title Summary field provided by Blackwell North America, Inc. All Rights Reserved