A Researcher s Guide to Sources on Soviet Social History in the 1930s

In this volume Western and Soviet specialists detail the untapped potential of sources on this period of Soviet social history and also the hidden traps that abound.

A Researcher s Guide to Sources on Soviet Social History in the 1930s

The Stalin era has been less accessible to researchers than either the preceding decade or the postwar era. The basic problem is that during the Stalin years censorship restricted the collection and dissemination of information (and introduced bias and distortion into the statistics that were published), while in the post-Stalin years access to archives and libraries remained tightly controlled. Thus it is not surprising that one of the main manifestations of glasnost has been the effort to open up records of the 1930s. In this volume Western and Soviet specialists detail the untapped potential of sources on this period of Soviet social history and also the hidden traps that abound. The full range of sources is covered, from memoirs to official documents, from city directories to computerized data bases.

A Researcher s Guide to Sources on Soviet Social History in the 1930s

VLADIMIR ZINOVEVICH DROBIZHEV, a Doctor of Historical Sciences and a specialist on Soviet social history, held the chair in Soviet history at the Moscow State ... She is currently working on a book on the peasantry in the 1930s.

A Researcher s Guide to Sources on Soviet Social History in the 1930s

The Stalin era has been less accessible to researchers than either the preceding decade or the postwar era. The basic problem is that during the Stalin years censorship restricted the collection and dissemination of information (and introduced bias and distortion into the statistics that were published), while in the post-Stalin years access to archives and libraries remained tightly controlled. Thus it is not surprising that one of the main manifestations of glasnost has been the effort to open up records of the 1930s. In this volume Western and Soviet specialists detail the untapped potential of sources on this period of Soviet social history and also the hidden traps that abound. The full range of sources is covered, from memoirs to official documents, from city directories to computerized data bases.

A History Of Russia Volume 2

Black, J. L. Origins, Evolution, and Nature of the Cold War: An Annotated Bibliographic Guide. Santa Barbara, Calif., 1986. ... A Researcher's Guide to Sources on Soviet Social History in the 1930s. Armonk, N.Y, 1990. Frame, Murray.

A History Of Russia Volume 2

Moss has significantly revised his text and bibliography in this second edition to reflect new research findings and controversies on numerous subjects. He has also brought the history up to date by revising the post-Soviet material, which now covers events from the end of 1991 up to the present day. This new edition retains the features of the successful first edition that have made it a popular choice in universities and colleges throughout the US, Canada and around the world.

Archives in Russia A Directory and Bibliographic Guide to Holdings in Moscow and St Petersburg

A Directory and Bibliographic Guide to Holdings in Moscow and St.Petersburg Patricia Kennedy Grimsted, Patricia Kennedy Grimstead ... A Researcher's Guide to Sources on Soviet Social History in the 1930s. Edited by Sheila Fitzpatrick ...

Archives in Russia  A Directory and Bibliographic Guide to Holdings in Moscow and St Petersburg

This is a comprehensive directory and bibliographic guide to Russian archives and manuscript repositories in the capital cities of Moscow and St. Petersburg. It is an essential resource for any researcher interested in Russian sources for topics in diplomatic, military, and church history; art; dance; film; literature; science; ethnolography; and geography. The first part lists general bibliographies of relevant reference literature, directories, bibliographic works, and specialized subject-related sources. In the following sections of the directory, archival listings are grouped in institutional categories. Coverage includes federal, ministerial, agency, presidential, local, university, Academy of Sciences, organizational, library, and museum holdings. Individual entries include the name of the repository (in Russian and English), basic information on location, staffing, institutional history, holdings, access, and finding aids. More comprehensive and up-to-date than the 1997 Russian Version, this edition includes Web-site information, dozens of additional repositories, several hundred more bibliographical entries, coverage of reorganization issues, four indexes, and a glossary.

Reading Russian Sources

A Researcher's Guide to Sources on Soviet Social History in the 1930s (Abingdon: Routledge, 1990). Freeze, Gregory L. (ed.), From Supplication to Revolution: A Documentary Social History of Imperial Russia (New York and Oxford: Oxford ...

Reading Russian Sources

Reading Russian Sources is an accessible and comprehensive guide that introduces students to the wide range of sources that can be used to engage with Russian history from the early medieval to the late Soviet periods. Divided into two parts, the book begins by considering approaches that can be taken towards the study of Russian history using primary sources. It then moves on to assess both textual and visual sources, including memoirs, autobiographies, journals, newspapers, art, maps, film and TV, enabling the reader to engage with and make sense of the burgeoning number of different sources and the ways they are used. Contributors illuminate key issues in the study of different areas of Russia’s history through their analysis of source materials, exploring some of the major issues in using different source types and reflecting recent discoveries that are changing the field. In so doing, the book orientates students within the broader methodological and conceptual debates that are defining the field and shaping the way Russian history is studied. Chronologically wide-ranging and supported by further reading, along with suggestions to help students guide their own enquiries, Reading Russian Sources is the ideal resource for any student undertaking research on Russian history.

Stage Fright

Soviet Memoirs as a Historical Source.” In A Researcher's Guide to Sources on Soviet Social History in the 1930s, edited by Sheila Fitzpatrick and Lynne Viola, 233–54. Armonk, N.Y.: M. E. Sharpe, 1990. Lauchlan, Iain.

Stage Fright

"Explores the relationship between culture and power in Imperial Russia. Argues that Russia's performing arts were part of a vibrant public culture that was usually ambivalent or hostile to the tumultuous political events of the revolutionary era"--Provided by publisher.

The Collectivization of Agriculture in Communist Eastern Europe

zsuzsanna vArGA is associate professor at the Department of modern hungarian history of eötvös loránd university, ... 2007. editor or co-editor of: A Researcher's Guide to Sources of Soviet Social History in the 1930s. armonk, n.

The Collectivization of Agriculture in Communist Eastern Europe

This book explores the interrelated campaigns of agricultural collectivization in the USSR and in the communist dictatorships established in Soviet-dominated Eastern Europe. Despite the profound, long-term societal impact of collectivization, the subject has remained relatively underresearched. The volume combines detailed studies of collectivization in individual Eastern European states with issueoriented comparative perspectives at regional level. Based on novel primarysources, it proposes a reappraisal of the theoretical underpinnings and research agenda of studies on collectivization in Eastern Europe.The contributions provide up-to-date overviews of recent research in the field and promote new approaches to the topic, combining historical comparisons with studies of transnational transfers and entanglements.

Enemies Within the Gates

For a discussion of the Smolensk Archive as a source, see J. Arch Getty, “The Smolensk Archive,” in Sheila Fitzpatrick and Lynne Viola, eds., A Researcher's Guide to Sources in Soviet Social History in the 1930s (New York, 1990). 4.

Enemies Within the Gates

This compelling work of documentary history tells a story of idealism betrayed, a story of how the Comintern (Communist International), an organization established by Lenin in 1919 to direct and assist revolutionary movements throughout the world, participated in, and was ultimately destroyed, by the Stalinist repression in the late 1930s. Presenting and drawing on recently declassified archival documents, William J. Chase analyses the Comintern's roles as agent, instrument, and victim of terror. In both principle and practice, the Comintern was an international organization, with a staff that consisted primarily of Communist emigres who had fled dictatorial regimes in Europe and Asia. It was, however, headquartered in Moscow and controlled by Soviet leaders. This book examines the rise of suspicions and xenophobia among Soviet and Comintern leaders and cadres for whom many foreigners were no longer the heroes of the class struggle but rather possible enemy agents. Some Comintern members internalised and acted on Stalin's theories about the infiltration of foreign spies into Soviet society, supplying the Soviet police with information that led to the exile or execution of emigres. Thousands of other emigres also became victims of the purges. Together the text and documents of this book convey graphically the essential roles played by the Comintern, providing a unique perspective on the era of Stalinist repression and terror.

Encyclopedia of Social History

Joe William Trotter, Professor of History at Carnegie Mellon University, is the author of Coal, Class, and Color: Blacks in Southern West Virginia, ... Sources on Soviet Social History in the 1930s (Armonk, NY: Sharpe, 1990).

Encyclopedia of Social History

A reference surveying the major concerns, findings, and terms of social history. The coverage includes major categories within social history (family, demographic transition, multiculturalism, industrialization, nationalism); major aspects of life for which social history has provided a crucial per

Social Dimensions of Soviet Industrialization

Her most recent books are A Researcher's Guide to Sources on Soviet Social History in the 1930s ( coedited with Lynne Viola ) and The Cultural Front : Power and Culture in Revolutionary Russia . She is completing a study of the Russian ...

Social Dimensions of Soviet Industrialization

"This is a fine book, impressive in both quantity and quality." —Journal of Economic History "The collection stands out as one of the most useful volumes currently available on the Soviet Union in the 1930s." —Labour History Review "Altogether, this book succeeds in opening up the social history of the Soviet Union in the era of planning for those students and scholars who are ready to advance beyond the old stereotypes."Â —ILWCH The pathbreaking essays assembled here examine the complex pattern of relationships between the first Five Year Plans and the society and culture of Stalinist Russia. Discussion focuses on urbanization, social mobility, questions of social identity and the cultural constructions of the industrialization drive, as well as work organization, management relations, and the underlying processes of industrial organization.

Contending with Stalinism

Soviet Power and Popular Resistance in the 1930s Lynne Viola ... in the repertoire of archival researchers. ... the USSR: A Practical Guide for Historians,” in A Researcher's Guide to Sources on Soviet Social History in the 1930s, ed.

Contending with Stalinism

Resistance has become an important and controversial analytical category for the study of Stalinism. The opening of Soviet archives allows historians an unprecedented look at the fabric of state and society in the 1930s. Researchers long spellbound by myths of Russian fatalism and submission as well as by the very real powers of the Stalinist state are startled by the dimensions of popular resistance under Stalin. Narratives of such resistance are inherently interesting, yet the topic is also significant because it sheds light on its historical surroundings. Contending with Stalinism employs the idea of resistance as a tool to explore what otherwise would remain opaque features of the social, cultural, and political history of the 1930s. In the process, the authors reveal a semi-autonomous world residing within and beyond the official world of Stalinism. Resistance ranged across a spectrum from violent strikes to the passive resistance that was a virtual way of life for millions and took many forms, from foot dragging and negligence to feigned ignorance and false compliance. Contending with Stalinism also highlights the problematic nature of resistance as an analytical category and stresses the ambiguous nature of the phenomenon. The topics addressed include working-class strikes, peasant rebellions, black-market crimes, official corruption, and homosexual and ethnic subcultures.

Living the Revolution

Kritika: Explorations in Russian and Eurasian History no. ... Crossing Borders: Modernity, Ideology, and Culture in Russia and the Soviet Union. ... In A Researcher's Guide to Sources on Soviet Social History in the 1930s.

Living the Revolution

Living the Revolution offers insight into the world of the early Soviet activists. At the heart of this book are a cast of fiery-eyed, bed-headed youths determined to be the change they wanted to see in the world. First banding together in the wake of the October Revolution, seizing hold of urban apartments, youthful enthusiasts tried to offer practical examples of socialist living. Calling themselves 'urban communes', they embraced total equality and shared everything from money to underwear. They actively sought to overturn the traditional family unit, reinvent domesticity, and promote a new collective vision of human interaction. A trend was set: a revolutionary meme that would, in the coming years, allow thousands of would-be revolutionaries and aspiring party members to experiment with the possibilities of socialism. The first definitive account of the urban communes, and the activists that formed them, this volume utilizes newly uncovered archival materials to chart the rise and fall of this revolutionary impulse. Laced with personal detail, it illuminates the thoughts and aspirations of individual activists as the idea of the urban commune grew from an experimental form of living, limited to a handful of participants in Petrograd and Moscow, into a cultural phenomenon that saw tens of thousands of youths form their own domestic units of socialist living by the end of the 1920s. Living the Revolution is a tale of revolutionary aspiration, appropriation, and participation at the ground level. Never officially sanctioned by the party, the urban communes challenge our traditional understanding of the early Soviet state, presenting Soviet ideology as something that could both frame and fire the imagination.

Soviet Criminal Justice Under Stalin

For a characterization of the most important of these journals , see Peter H. Solomon , Jr. , “ Legal Journals and Soviet Social History , " in A Researcher's Guide to Sources on Soviet Social History in the 1930s , edited by Sheila ...

Soviet Criminal Justice Under Stalin

The first comprehensive account of Stalin's struggle to make criminal law in the USSR a reliable instrument of rule offers new perspectives on collectivization, the Great Terror, the politics of abortion, and the disciplining of the labor force.

Russian Economic Development over Three Centuries

Statistical Sources for the Study of Soviet Social History in the Prewar Period. In Fitzpatrick, S. and Viola, L. (Eds.), A Researcher's Guide to Sources on Soviet Social History in the 1930s (pp. 153–175). Armonk: M.E. Sharpe.

Russian Economic Development over Three Centuries

This book aims to provide a comprehensive statistical picture of the Russian economic development covering the Imperial, Soviet, and New Russian periods. The authors have reconstructed Russian socio-economic statistics from both published and archival materials. The book gives concise descriptions as well as new insights on the Russian economic development. Compiled such that estimations by the authors are kept to a minimum and extensive explanations and notes on the sources, the definitions, the statistical methodologies, the problems and inconsistencies of the original data, and the pitfalls of interpreting the time series are given makes this a standard reference book of the Russian economic history. It will be of value to economists, scholars of collectivist economics, and scholars of Russia and the Soviet experience.

The Economic Transformation of the Soviet Union 1913 1945

Further reading A general guide to the problems of Soviet statistical sources is provided by S. G. Wheatcroft in S. Fitzpatrick and L. Viola ( eds . ) , A Researcher's Guide to Sources on Soviet Social History in the 1930s ( Armonk ...

The Economic Transformation of the Soviet Union  1913 1945

Leading scholars in the field analyse the Soviet economy sector by sector to make available, in textbook form, the results of the latest research on Soviet industrialisation.

Women Workers in the Soviet Interwar Economy

... and Children in Soviet Russia (London, 1932) Filtzer, D., Soviet Workers and Stalinist Industrialisation (London, 1986) Fitzpatrick, S. and Viola, L., A Researcher's Guide to Sources on Soviet Social History in the 1930s (London, ...

Women Workers in the Soviet Interwar Economy

This book examines changes in official Soviet policy towards the labour protection of women workers, 1917-41. Important legislative enactments are analysed. In the 1920s emphasis was placed on the 'protection' of female labour by the agencies responsible for regulating women's role in industrial production. With the mass recruitment of women workers to the Soviet industrialisation drive by the early 1930s, labour protection issues were often ignored as women were encouraged to play a more 'equal' role in the production process.

Tear Off the Masks

Soviet ideological controls began to crumble in the mid 1980s during perestroika and then disappeared altogether with the collapse of the ... A Researcher's Guide to Sources on Soviet Social History in the 1930s (Armonk, N.Y., 1990).

Tear Off the Masks

When revolutions happen, they change the rules of everyday life--both the codified rules concerning the social and legal classifications of citizens and the unwritten rules about how individuals present themselves to others. This occurred in Russia after the Bolshevik Revolution of 1917, which laid the foundations of the Soviet state, and again in 1991, when that state collapsed. Tear Off the Masks! is about the remaking of identities in these times of upheaval. Sheila Fitzpatrick here brings together in a single volume years of distinguished work on how individuals literally constructed their autobiographies, defended them under challenge, attempted to edit the "file-selves" created by bureaucratic identity documentation, and denounced others for "masking" their true social identities. Marxist class-identity labels--"worker," "peasant," "intelligentsia," "bourgeois"--were of crucial importance to the Soviet state in the 1920s and 1930s, but it turned out that the determination of a person's class was much more complicated than anyone expected. This in turn left considerable scope for individual creativity and manipulation. Outright imposters, both criminal and political, also make their appearance in this book. The final chapter describes how, after decades of struggle to construct good Soviet socialist personae, Russians had to struggle to make themselves fit for the new, post-Soviet world in the 1990s--by "de-Sovietizing" themselves. Engaging in style and replete with colorful detail and characters drawn from a wealth of sources, Tear Off the Masks! offers unique insight into the elusive forms of self-presentation, masking, and unmasking that made up Soviet citizenship and continue to resonate in the post-Soviet world.

War Stories

Kuromiya, H. 'Soviet Memoirs as a Historical Source', in S. Fitzpatrick and L. Viola (eds), A Researcher's Guide to Sources on Soviet Social History in the 1930s (New York and London: M.E. Sharpe, 1992), 233–54.

War Stories

Although war memoirs constitute a rich, varied literary form, they are often dismissed by historians as unreliable. This collection of essays is one of the first to explore the modern war memoir, revealing the genre’s surprising capacity for breadth and sophistication while remaining sensitive to the challenges it poses for scholars. Covering conflicts from the Napoleonic era to today, the studies gathered here consider how memoirs have been used to transmit particular views of war even as they have emerged within specific social and political contexts.

Cosmopolitanism in Conflict

'Archival Research in the USSR: A Practical Guide for Historians'. In A Researcher's Guide to Sources on Soviet Social History in the 1930s, edited by Sheila Fitzpatrick and Lynne Viola, [page numbers here]. New York: M.E. Sharpe, 1990.

Cosmopolitanism in Conflict

This book is the first study to engage with the relationship between cosmopolitan political thought and the history of global conflicts. Accompanied by visual material ranging from critical battle painting to the photographic representation of ruins, it showcases established as well as emerging interdisciplinary scholarship in global political thought and cultural history. Touching on the progressive globalization of conflicts between the eighteenth and the twentieth century, including the War of the Spanish Succession, the Seven Years’ War, the Napoleonic wars, the two World Wars, as well as seemingly ‘internal’ civil wars in eastern Europe’s imperial frontiers, it shows how these conflicts produced new zones of cultural contact. The authors build on a rich foundation of unpublished sources drawn from public institutions as well as private archives, allowing them to shed new light on the British, Russian, German, Ottoman, American, and transnational history of international thought and political engagement.