A Vital Rationalist

A Vital Rationalist brings together for thefirst time a selection of Canguilhem's most important writings, including excerpts from previouslyunpublished manuscripts and a critical bibliography by Camille Limoges.Organized around the ...

A Vital Rationalist

A selection of Canguilhem's writings, including excerpts from previously unpublished manuscripts. Organized around Canguilhem's usual intellectual themes and problems, the text offers an array of meditations on epistemology, methodology, science, and history.

Essays on the Anthropology of Reason

Vital. Rationalist. Georges Canguilhem was born in Castelnaudary in
southwestern France in 1904. Although his father was a tailor, Canguilhem liked
to refer to himself, not without a certain twinkle in his eye, as of peasant stock,
rooted in the ...

Essays on the Anthropology of Reason

Anthropologist Paul Rabinow focuses on the core of Western rationality, in particular the practices of molecular biology as they apply to our understanding of human nature. In his final essay, Rabinow reflects in dialogue with biochemist Tom White on the place of science in modernity, on science as a vocation, and on the differences between the human and natural sciences.

Through the Healing Glass

97 Paul Rabinow makes these points in his introduction to Canguilhem's writings,
see Georges Canguilhem and François Delaporte, A Vital Rationalist: Selected
Writings from Georges Canguilhem, trans. Arthur Goldhammer (New York: Zone ...

Through the Healing Glass

In the mid-1920s a physiologist, a glass chemist, and a zoo embarked on a project which promised to turn buildings into medical instruments. The advanced chemistry of "Vita" Glass mobilised theories of light and medicine, health practices and glassmaking technology to compress an entire epoch’s hopes for a healthy life into a glass sheet – yet it did so invisibly. To communicate its advantage, Pilkington Bros. spared no expense as they launched the most costly and sophisticated marketing campaign in their history. Engineering need for "Vita" Glass employed leading-edge market research, evocative photography and vanguard techniques of advertising psychology, accompanied by the claim: "Let in the Health Rays of Daylight Permanently through "Vita" Glass Windows." This is the story of how, despite the best efforts of two glass companies, the leading marketing firm of the day, and the opinions of leading medical minds, "Vita" Glass failed. However, it epitomised an age of lightness and airiness, sleeping porches, flat roofs and ribbon windows. Moreover, through its remarkable print advertising, it strove to shape the ideal relationship between our buildings and our bodies.

Victorian Contagion

82 Georges Canguilhem, A Vital Rationalist: Selected Writings from George
Canguilhem, trans. Arthur Goldhammer (New York: Zone Books, 2000), 319. 83
Georges Canguilhem, Ideology and Rationality in the History of the Life Sciences
, ...

Victorian Contagion

Victorian Contagion: Risk and Social Control in the Victorian Literary Imagination examines the literary and cultural production of contagion in the Victorian era and the way that production participated in a moral economy of surveillance and control. In this book, I attempt to make sense of how the discursive practice of contagion governed the interactions and correlations between medical science, literary creation, and cultural imagination. Victorians dealt with the menace of contagion by theorizing a working motto in claiming the goodness and godliness in cleanliness which was theorized, realized, and radicalized both through practice and imagination. The Victorian discourse around cleanliness and contagion, including all its treatments and preventions, developed into a culture of medicalization, a perception of surveillance, a politics of health, an economy of morality, and a way of thinking. This book is an attempt to understands the literary and cultural elements which contributed to fear and anticipation of contagion, and to explain why and how these elements still matter to us today.

Engineering Nature

A Vital Rationalist: Selected Writings from Georges Canguilhem (New York: Zone
Books, 1994), pp. 84–85. Margulis, L. Symbiosis of Cell Evolution (San Francisco
: W.H Freeman and Company, 1981). Wallin, I. Symbionticism and the Origin of ...

Engineering Nature

This third volume in the Consciousness Reframed series, documenting the very latest artistic and theoretical research in new media and telematics including aspects of artificial life, robotics, technoetics, performance, computer music and intelligent architecture. The contributions to this volume represent the work produced at conferences and in journals which are only now emerging into more accessible literature. With over fifty highly respected practitioners and theorists in art and science contributing, there is a stimulating diversity of approach and a rich background of knowledge.

Post Rationalism

unpublished seminar paper given at the University of Liege, August 12, 2011,
available online: www.ed1.ulgac.be/sd/textes/20111208-Wong.pdf. 0
Canguilhem, Knowledge of Life, xviii. Ibid., xix. 2 P. Rabinow, “Introduction: A
Vital Rationalist,” ...

Post Rationalism

Post-Rationalism takes the experimental journal of psychoanalysis and philosophy, Cahiers pour l'Analyse, as its main source. Established by students of Louis Althusser in 1966, the journal has rarely figured in the literature, although it contained the first published work of authors now famous in contemporary critical thought, including Alain Badiou, Jean-Claude Milner, Luce Irigaray, André Green and Jacques-Alain Miller. The Cahiers served as a testing ground for the combination of diverse intellectual sources indicative of the period, including the influential reinvention of Freud and Marx undertaken by Lacan and Althusser, and the earlier post-rationalist philosophy of science pioneered by Gaston Bachelard, Georges Canguilhem and Alexandre Koyré. This book is a wide-ranging analysis of the intellectual foundations of structuralism, re-connecting the work of young post-Lacanian and post-Althusserian theorists with their predecessors in French philosophy of science. Tom Eyers provides an important corrective to standard histories of the period, focussing on the ways in which French epistemological writing of the 1930s and 1940s - especially that of Bachelard and Canguilhem - laid the ground for the emergence of structuralism in the 1950s and 1960s, thus questioning the standard historical narrative that posits structuralism as emerging chiefly in reaction to phenomenology and existentialism.

Growing Explanations

Canguilhem, A Vital Rationalist Despairing of the possibility of a fully
physicochemical (or mechanistic) account of vital phenomena, Claude Bernard
felt obliged to conclude in 1878 that "some invisible guide seems to direct [the
phenomenon] ...

Growing Explanations

For much of the twentieth century scientists sought to explain objects and processes by reducing them to their components—nuclei into protons and neutrons, proteins into amino acids, and so on—but over the past forty years there has been a marked turn toward explaining phenomena by building them up rather than breaking them down. This collection reflects on the history and significance of this turn toward “growing explanations” from the bottom up. The essays show how this strategy—based on a widespread appreciation for complexity even in apparently simple processes and on the capacity of computers to simulate such complexity—has played out in a broad array of sciences. They describe how scientists are reordering knowledge to emphasize growth, change, and contingency and, in so doing, are revealing even phenomena long considered elementary—like particles and genes—as emergent properties of dynamic processes. Written by leading historians and philosophers of science, these essays examine the range of subjects, people, and goals involved in changing the character of scientific analysis over the last several decades. They highlight the alternatives that fields as diverse as string theory, fuzzy logic, artificial life, and immunology bring to the forms of explanation that have traditionally defined scientific modernity. A number of the essays deal with the mathematical and physical sciences, addressing concerns with hybridity and the materials of the everyday world. Other essays focus on the life sciences, where questions such as “What is life?” and “What is an organism?” are undergoing radical re-evaluation. Together these essays mark the contours of an ongoing revolution in scientific explanation. Contributors. David Aubin, Amy Dahan Dalmedico, Richard Doyle, Claus Emmeche, Peter Galison, Stefan Helmreich, Ann Johnson, Evelyn Fox Keller, Ilana Löwy, Claude Rosental, Alfred Tauber

Spectral Nationality

De Anima: Books 2 and 3, trans. D. W. Hamlyn (Oxford: Clarendon, 1993), 2.1.
412a11. This is the nutritive faculty basic to all living beings (2.4.415a-b). 67. De
Anima 2.1.412a22–28. 68. Cf. Georges Canguilhem, A Vital Rationalist: Selected
 ...

Spectral Nationality

This far-ranging and ambitious attempt to rethink postcolonial theory's discussion of the nation and nationalism brings the problems of the postcolonial condition to bear on the philosophy of freedom. Closely identified with totalitarianism and fundamentalism, the nation-state has a tainted history of coercion, ethnic violence, and even, as in ultranationalist Nazi Germany, genocide. Most contemporary theorists are therefore skeptical, if not altogether dismissive, of the idea of the nation and the related metaphor of the political body as an organism. Going against orthodoxy, Pheng Cheah retraces the universal-rationalist foundations and progressive origins of political organicism in the work of Kant and its development in philosophers in the German tradition such as Fichte, Hegel, and Marx. Cheah argues that the widespread association of freedom with the self-generating dynamism of life and culture's power of transcendence is the most important legacy of this tradition. Addressing this legacy's manifestations in Fanon and Cabral's theories of anticolonial struggle and contemporary anticolonial literature, including the Buru Quartet by Indonesian writer Pramoedya Ananta Toer, and the Kenyan writer Ngugi Wa Thiong'o's nationalist novels, Cheah suggests that the profound difficulties of achieving freedom in the postcolonial world indicate the need to reconceptualize freedom in terms of the figure of the specter rather than the living organism.

In Quest of a Vital Protestant Center

16 It is this enriched neo-orthodox infused evangelicalism—shorn of
obscurantism and biblical literalism— through which Bloesch seeks to encounter
excessively rationalist strains within evangelical theology and subjectivist,
pluralistic, and ...

In Quest of a Vital Protestant Center

In Quest of a Vital Protestant Center probes the relationship between Scripture and culture in twentieth-century US theology and biblical studies. It points to the necessity of turning to what Karl Barth has referred to as "the strange new world within the Bible" for any revitalization of mainline Protestantism in the tradition of the Protestant Reformers in critical dialogue with serious evangelical theology. The study includes a historical overview underlying what Demetrion refers to as the "fundamentalist/modernist great divide," which continues to resonate powerfully in contemporary US Protestant thought and culture. Demetrion offers an in-depth exploration of four representative twentieth-century Protestant theologians and biblical scholars, spanning from the conservative evangelical theology of J. I. Packer to the postliberal dialectical theology of Walter Brueggemann. The book includes a chapter on the neo-orthodox legacy as a mediating resource in bringing evangelical and postliberal theology into dialogue with the core issues of theology, biblical hermeneutics, and religious culture. Demetrion concludes with a critically empathetic review of the postliberal dialectical theology of Douglas J. Hall and the evangelical narrative theology of Richard Lints. In linking evangelical, postliberal, and neo-orthodox theology to a common search for a vital Protestant center, this book will facilitate fruitful dialogue among divergent schools of Protestant thought and culture.

The Estrogen Elixir

... Etudes d'histoire et de philosophie des sciences (Paris: Vrin, 1968), as
translated by Arthur Goldhammer in Francois Delaporte, ed., A Vital Rationalist:
Selected Writings from Georges Canguilhem (New York: Zone Books, 1994), 115
–28.

The Estrogen Elixir

In the first complete history of hormone replacement therapy (HRT), Elizabeth Siegel Watkins illuminates the complex and changing relationship between the medical treatment of menopause and cultural conceptions of aging. Describing the development, spread, and shifting role of HRT in America from the early twentieth century to the present, Watkins explores how the interplay between science and society shaped the dissemination and reception of HRT and how the medicalization—and subsequent efforts toward the demedicalization—of menopause and aging affected the role of estrogen as a medical therapy. Telling the story from multiple perspectives—physicians, pharmaceutical manufacturers, government regulators, feminist health activists, and the media, as well as women as patients and consumers—she reveals the striking parallels between estrogen’s history as a medical therapy and broad shifts in the role of medicine in an aging society. Today, information about HRT is almost always accompanied by a laundry list of health risks. While physicians and pharmaceutical companies have striven to develop the safest possible treatment for the symptoms of menopause and aging, many specialists question whether HRT should be prescribed at all. Drawing from a wide range of scholarly research, archival records, and interviews, The Estrogen Elixir provides valuable historical context for one of the most pressing debates in contemporary medicine.

Philosophy in Turbulent Times

A Vital Rationalist: Selected Writings from Georges Canguilhem. Ed. François
Delaporte, with an introduction by Paul Rabinow and a critical bibliography by
Camille Limoges.Trans. Arthur Goldhammer. New York: Zone Books, 1994.
Castel ...

Philosophy in Turbulent Times

For Elisabeth Roudinesco, a historian of psychoanalysis and one of France's leading intellectuals, Canguilhem, Sartre, Foucault, Althusser, Deleuze, and Derrida represent a "great generation" of French philosophers who accomplished remarkable work and lived incredible lives. These troubled and innovative thinkers endured World War II and the cultural and political revolution of the 1960s, and their cultural horizon was dominated by Marxism and psychoanalysis, though they were by no means strict adherents to the doctrines of Marx and Freud. Roudinesco knew many of these intellectuals personally, and she weaves an account of their thought through lived experience and reminiscences. Canguilhem, for example, was a distinguished philosopher of science who had a great influence on Foucault's exploration of sanity and madness-themes Althusser lived in a notorious personal drama. And in dramatizing the life of Freud for the screen, Sartre fundamentally altered his own philosophical approach to psychoanalysis. Roudinesco launches a passionate defense of Canguilhem, Sartre, Foucault, Althusser, Deleuze, and Derrida against the "new philosophers" of the late 1970s and 1980s, who denounced the work-and sometimes the private lives-of this great generation. Roudinesco refutes attempts to tar them, as well as the Marxist and left-wing tradition in general, with the brush of Soviet-style communism. In Freudian theory and the philosophy of radical commitment, she sees a bulwark against the kind of manipulative, pill-prescribing, and normalizing psychology that aims to turn individuals into mindless consumers. Intense, clever, and persuasive, Philosophy in Turbulent Times captivates with the dynamism of French thought in the twentieth century.

The Racial Discourses of Life Philosophy

Georges Canguilhem, A Vital Rationalist: Selected Writings from Georges
Canguilhem (New York: Zone Books, 2000). Canguilhem writes that Man “can
look at nature in two ways. He feels that he is a child of nature and has a sense of
belong ...

The Racial Discourses of Life Philosophy

In the early twentieth century, the life philosophy of Henri Bergson summoned the élan vital, or vital force, as the source of creative evolution. Bergson also appealed to intuition, which focused on experience rather than discursive thought and scientific cognition. Particularly influential for the literary and political Négritude movement of the 1930s, which opposed French colonialism, Bergson's life philosophy formed an appealing alternative to Western modernity, decried as "mechanical," and set the stage for later developments in postcolonial theory and vitalist discourse. Revisiting narratives on life that were produced in this age of machinery and war, Donna V. Jones shows how Bergson, Nietzsche, and the poets Leopold Senghor and Aimé Césaire fashioned the concept of life into a central aesthetic and metaphysical category while also implicating it in discourses on race and nation. Jones argues that twentieth-century vitalism cannot be understood separately from these racial and anti-Semitic discussions. She also shows that some dominant models of emancipation within black thought become intelligible only when in dialogue with the vitalist tradition. Jones's study strikes at the core of contemporary critical theory, which integrates these older discourses into larger critical frameworks, and she traces the ways in which vitalism continues to draw from and contribute to its making.

The Global Genome

Also see the articles in Julio Licino and Ma-Li Wong, eds., Pharmacogenomics:
The Search for Individualized Therapies (Weinheim, Germany: Wiley- VCH, 2002
). 36. Georges Canguilhem, "The Concept of Life," in A Vital Rationalist, ed.

The Global Genome

How global biotechnology is redefining "life itself." In the age of global biotechnology, DNA can exist as biological material in a test tube, as a sequence in a computer database, and as economically valuable information in a patent. In The Global Genome, Eugene Thacker asks us to consider the relationship of these three entities and argues that—by their existence and their interrelationships—they are fundamentally redefining the notion of biological life itself. Biological science and the biotech industry are increasingly organized at a global level, in large part because of the use of the Internet in exchanging biological data. International genome sequencing efforts, genomic databases, the development of World Intellectual Property policies, and the "borderless" business of biotech are all evidence of the global intersections of biology and informatics—of genetic codes and computer codes. Thacker points out the internal tension in the very concept of biotechnology: the products are more "tech" than "bio," but the technology itself is fully biological, composed of the biomaterial labor of genes, proteins, cells, and tissues. Is biotechnology a technology at all, he asks, or is it a notion of "life itself" that is inseparable from its use in the biotech industry? The three sections of the book cover the three primary activities of biotechnology today: the encoding of biological materials into digital form—as in bioinformatics and genomics; its recoding in various ways—including the "biocolonialism" of mapping genetically isolated ethnic populations and the newly pervasive concern over "biological security"; and its decoding back into biological materiality—as in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Thacker moves easily from science to philosophy to political economics, enlivening his account with ideas from such thinkers as Georges Bataille, Georges Canguilhem, Michel Foucault, Antonio Negri, and Paul Virilio. The "global genome," says Thacker, makes it impossible to consider biotechnology without the context of globalism.

Spinoza Beyond Philosophy

75–102. Butler, Judith (1997), The Psychic Life of Power, Stanford: Stanford
University Press. Butler, Judith (2005), Giving an Account of Oneself, New York:
Fordham University Press. Canguilhem, Georges (1994), A Vital Rationalist, ...

Spinoza Beyond Philosophy

This book of 10 engaging and original essays brings Spinoza outside the realm of academic philosophy, and presents him as a thinker who is relevant to contemporary problems and questions across a variety of disciplines.

Modern European Criticism and Theory A Critical Guide

A Vital Rationalist. New York, 1994. Fichant, M. `Georges Canguilhem et l'IdeÂe
de la philosophie', Georges Canguilhem: Philosophe, historien des sciences, ed.
FrancËois Delaporte. Paris, 1993. Foucault, M. The Archeology of Knowledge.

Modern European Criticism and Theory  A Critical Guide

Modern European Criticism and Theory offers the reader a comprehensive critical overview of the widespread and profound contest of ideas within European 'theory'. The book focuses primarily on the thought of major voices in poetics, philosophy, linguistics, and psychoanalysis, as well as in literary and cultural studies from the Enlightenment to the present day. Examining how conceptions of subjectivity, identity and gender have been questioned, the more than 50 essays written by acknowledged experts in their fields critically assess the ways in which we think, see, and act in the world, as well as the ways in which we represent such thought psychologically, politically, and culturally. A further reading list accompanies each chapter.

Media Ecologies

For the investigations of "epistemological breaks" between scientific approaches,
see sections of Georges Canguilhem, A Vital Rationalist: Selected Writings from
Georges Canguilhem, ed. Francois Delaporte, Zone Books, New York, 2000; ...

Media Ecologies

A "dirty materialist" ride through the media cultures of pirate radio, photography, the Internet, media art, cultural evolution, and surveillance.

Revisiting Normativity with Deleuze

... The Cynics: The Cynic Movement in Antiquity and Its Legacy. Berkeley:
University of California Press, pp. 1–27. Canguilhem, G. (1994), A Vital
Rationalist: Selected Writings from Georges Canguilhem (edited by F. Delaporte,
translated by A.

Revisiting Normativity with Deleuze

This volume assembles some of the most distinguished scholars in the field of Deleuze studies in order to provide both an accessible introduction to key concepts in Deleuze's thought and to test them in view of the issue of normativity. This includes not only the law, but also the question of norms and values in the broader ethical, political and methodological sense. The volume argues that Deleuze's philosophy rejects the unitary vision of the subject as a self-regulating rationalist entity and replaces it with a process-oriented relational vision of the subject. But what can we do exactly with this alternative nomadic vision? What modes of normativity are available outside the parameters of liberal, self-reflexive individualism on the one hand and the communitarian model on the other? This interdisciplinary volume explores these issues in three directions that mirror Deleuze and Guattari's defense of the parallelism between philosophy, science, and the arts. The volume therefore covers socio-political and legal theory; the epistemological critique of scientific discourse and the cultural, artistic and aesthetic interventions emerging from Deleuze's philosophy.

Foucault s Archaeology

... The Normal and the Pathological, trans. Fawcett, Carolyn R. (New York: Zone
Books, 1991). Canguilhem, Georges, A Vital Rationalist: Selected Writings From
Georges Canguilhem, trans. Goldhammer, Arthur (New York: Zone Books, 2000).

Foucault s Archaeology

Reveals the extent to which Foucault's approach to language in The Archaeology of Knowledge was influenced by the mathematical sciences, adopting a mode of thought indebted to thinkers in the scientific and epistemological traditions such as Cavailles and

A Companion to Nietzsche

A Vital Rationalist: Selected Writings, trans. Arthur Goldhammer (New York: Zone
Books). Cox, Christoph (1999). Nietzsche, Naturalism, and Interpretation (
Berkeley: University of California Press). Green, Michael S. (2003). Nietzsche
and the ...

A Companion to Nietzsche

A Companion to Nietzsche provides a comprehensive guide to all the main aspects of Nietzsche's philosophy, profiling the most recent research and trends in scholarship. Brings together an international roster of both rising stars and established scholars, including many of the leading commentators and interpreters of Nietzsche. Showcases the latest trends in Nietzsche scholarship, such as the renewed focus on Nietzsche’s philosophy of time, of nature, and of life. Includes clearly organized sections on Art, Nature, and Individuation; Nietzsche's New Philosophy of the Future; Eternal Recurrence, the Overhuman, and Nihilism; Philosophy of Mind; Philosophy and Genealogy; Ethics; Politics; Aesthetics; Evolution and Life. Features fresh treatments of Nietzsche’s core and enigmatic doctrines.

Prefiguring Cyberculture

Muscles and engines: Indicator diagrams in Heimholtz's physiology. In
Universalgenie Helmholtz: Ruckblick nach lOOfahren, ed. L. Kruger. 124-145.
Berlin: Akademie Verlag. Canguilhem, G. 1994. A vital rationalist. Cambridge, MA
: MIT Press ...

Prefiguring Cyberculture

A multidisciplinary compilation of essays and other writings explores the antecedents of Internet technology in the works of Plato, Aristotle, Descartes, Mary Shelley, William Gibson, and others. (Technology)