A Woman of No Importance

A Woman of No Importance is the breathtaking story of how one woman's fierce persistence helped win the war.

A Woman of No Importance

A NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER Chosen as a BEST BOOK OF THE YEAR by NPR, the New York Public Library, Amazon, the Seattle Times, the Washington Independent Review of Books, PopSugar, the Minneapolis Star Tribune, BookBrowse, the Spectator, and the Times of London Winner of the Plutarch Award for Best Biography “Excellent…This book is as riveting as any thriller, and as hard to put down.” -- The New York Times Book Review "A compelling biography of a masterful spy, and a reminder of what can be done with a few brave people -- and a little resistance." - NPR "A meticiulous history that reads like a thriller." - Ben Macintyre A never-before-told story of Virginia Hall, the American spy who changed the course of World War II, from the author of Clementine. In 1942, the Gestapo sent out an urgent transmission: "She is the most dangerous of all Allied spies. We must find and destroy her." The target in their sights was Virginia Hall, a Baltimore socialite who talked her way into Special Operations Executive, the spy organization dubbed Winston Churchill's "Ministry of Ungentlemanly Warfare." She became the first Allied woman deployed behind enemy lines and--despite her prosthetic leg--helped to light the flame of the French Resistance, revolutionizing secret warfare as we know it. Virginia established vast spy networks throughout France, called weapons and explosives down from the skies, and became a linchpin for the Resistance. Even as her face covered wanted posters and a bounty was placed on her head, Virginia refused order after order to evacuate. She finally escaped through a death-defying hike over the Pyrenees into Spain, her cover blown. But she plunged back in, adamant that she had more lives to save, and led a victorious guerilla campaign, liberating swathes of France from the Nazis after D-Day. Based on new and extensive research, Sonia Purnell has for the first time uncovered the full secret life of Virginia Hall--an astounding and inspiring story of heroism, spycraft, resistance, and personal triumph over shocking adversity. A Woman of No Importance is the breathtaking story of how one woman's fierce persistence helped win the war.

A Woman of No Importance

A Woman of No Importance


A Woman Of No Importance

After a time they judge them. Rarely, if ever, do they forgive them. Oscar Wilde, A
Woman of No Importance MY DAUGHTER IS FIVE NOW. FIVE GOING ON fifteen.
It's been an interesting five years, packed with incident and achievement and ...

A Woman Of No Importance

If there's one thing that everyone has an opinion about it's how to bring up a child - especially your child. Kate Konopicky found herself an embattled mother, knowing that however hard she worked everything was wrong. If she went back to full-time employment she was neglecting her child. If she stayed at home the child would be clingy and shy. So, she became a combination of teacher, nurse, nutritionist, psychologist, entertainer and mind reader. She didn't get weekends off and never phoned in sick when she wanted a lie-in. The boss was illogical, demanding, incapable of undertaking the simplest task. Yes, we've all had jobs like that but at least we got paid for them. Kate Konopicky is an anarchic voice in the face of regimented parenting books. With brilliant humour, she'll make you believe you're not a failure when your fairy cakes don't rise, and you'll slowly come to realise that you may not be perfect but that you are doing your best. 'A wildly irreverent look at the parenting game. This riotous look back over her first five years of motherhood will come as a relief to imperfect parents everywhere - in other words, to all parents.' You Magazine

Further Indiscretions by a Woman of No Importance

MRS. STUART MENZIES FURTHER INDISCRETIONS BY A WOMAN OF NO
IMPORTANCE ILLUSTRATED N,EW. by a Woman of No Importance Sir Frank
Lockwood's Sketch During the Wood V. Cox Case. Further Indiscretions Front
Cover.

Further Indiscretions by a Woman of No Importance

Facsimile reprint of "Further Indiscretions," 1918 edition.

A Woman of No Importance with audio

... TitlePageFirstActPart I First Act Part II Second Act Part I Second Act Part II
Second Act PartIII Third ActPartI Third Act Part II Fourth Act Part I Fourth ActPart II
PLOT SUMMARY Interview About L.A. Theatre Works A Woman of No
Importance by ...

A Woman of No Importance  with audio

Enhanced ebook edition of A Woman of No Importance featuring a full cast audio performance of the play. Devilishly attractive Lord Illingworth is notorious for his skill as a seducer. But he is still invited to all the “best” houses while his female conquests must hide their shame in seclusion. In this devastating comedy, Wilde uses his celebrated wit to expose English society’s narrow view of everything from sexual mores to Americans. The ebook also features an interview Merlin Holland, Oscar Wilde’s only grandchild, and author of The Real Trial of Oscar Wilde. By merging text and audio, this is a perfect learning tool for enhancing comprehension and enjoyment. The text includes plot summaries of each scene, and it is highly recommended as a study aid for students, teachers, actors and directors. Includes scene-by-scene and word-for-word text and audio of L.A. Theatre Works’ full cast performance starring: Martin Jarvis as Lord Illingworth Peter Dennis as Sir John Pontefract Jim Norton as Mr. Kelvil, M.P. Robert Machray as The Ven. Archdeacon Daubeny, D.D. Paul Gutrecht as Gerald Arbuthnot Miriam Margolyes as Lady Hunstanton Jane Carr as Lady Caroline Pontefract Judy Geeson as Lady Stutfield Cherie Lunghi as Mrs. Allonby and Alice Samantha Mathis as Miss Hester Worsley Rosalind Ayres as Mrs. Arbuthnot. Adapted by Martin Jarvis and directed by Michael Hackett for L.A. Theatre Works.

A Woman of No Importance The Untold Story of the American Spy Who Helped Win World War II

A WOMAN OF NO IMPORTANCE The Untold Story of the American Spy Who
Helped Win World War II SONIA PURNELL author of Clementine : The Life of Mrs
. Winston Churchill A Woman of No Importance The Untold Story of the.

A Woman of No Importance  The Untold Story of the American Spy Who Helped Win World War II

In 1942, the Gestapo sent out an urgent transmission: "She is the most dangerous of all Allied spies. We must find and destroy her." The target in their sights was Virginia Hall, a Baltimore socialite who talked her way into Special Operations Executive, the spy organization dubbed Winston Churchill's "Ministry of Ungentlemanly Warfare." She became the first Allied woman deployed behind enemy lines and--despite her prosthetic leg--helped to light the flame of the French Resistance, revolutionizing secret warfare as we know it. Virginia established vast spy networks throughout France, called weapons and explosives down from the skies, and became a linchpin for the Resistance. Even as her face covered wanted posters and a bounty was placed on her head, Virginia refused order after order to evacuate. She finally escaped through a death-defying hike over the Pyrenees into Spain, her cover blown. But she plunged back in, adamant that she had more lives to save, and led a victorious guerilla campaign, liberating swathes of France from the Nazis after D-Day. Based on new and extensive research, Sonia Purnell has for the first time uncovered the full secret life of Virginia Hall--an astounding and inspiring story of heroism, spycraft, resistance, and personal triumph over shocking adversity. A Woman of No Importance is the breathtaking story of how one woman's fierce persistence helped win the war.

A Woman of No Importance

At work Peggy has carved herself a comfortable niche.

A Woman of No Importance

At work Peggy has carved herself a comfortable niche. Once in hospital, she loses no time in establishing herself as Queen Bee, taking on several responsibilities. Persistently cheerful, blind to the feelings of others and, at heart, terribly lonely, Peggy is at once a richly comic and desperately moving creation, providing a rewarding challenge for a mature actress.

A Woman of No Importance

You Are Sure to enjoy and value this great edition! Highly Recommended!

A Woman of No Importance

You Are Sure to enjoy and value this great edition! Highly Recommended!

An Ideal Husband

An Ideal Husband


A Woman of No Importance a Play Oscar Wilde

Oscar Wilde's audacious drama of social scandal centres around the revelation of Mrs Arbuthnot's long-concealed secret.

A Woman of No Importance a Play   Oscar Wilde

Oscar Wilde's audacious drama of social scandal centres around the revelation of Mrs Arbuthnot's long-concealed secret. A house party is in full swing at Lady Hunstanton's country home, when it is announced that Gerald Arbuthnot has been appointed secretary to the sophisticated, witty Lord Illingworth. Gerald's mother stands in the way of his appointment, but fears to tell him why, for who will believe Lord Illingworth to be a man of no importance?

A Critic In Pall Mall A Woman of No Importance

This is great news for Gerald, as being Lord Illingworth's secretary would be the young man's first step to a life of financial/political success.

A Critic In Pall Mall   A Woman of No Importance

A Woman of No Importance is a play by Irish playwright Oscar Wilde. The play premièred on 19 April 1893 at London's Haymarket Theatre. Like Wilde's other society plays, it satirizes English upper-class society. It has been performed on stages in Europe and North America since his death in 1900. The play opens with a party on a terrace in Lady Hunstanton's estate. The upper class guests spend the better part of Act I exchanging social gossip and small talk. Lady Caroline Pontefract patronizes an American visitor, Hester Worsley, and proceeds to give her own opinion of everyone in the room (and her surrounding life). Lady Caroline also denounces Hester's enthusiasm for Gerald Arbuthnot until Gerald himself enters to proclaim that Lord Illingworth, a powerful, flirtatious male political figure, intends to take him under his wing as secretary. This is great news for Gerald, as being Lord Illingworth's secretary would be the young man's first step to a life of financial/political success. The guests then discuss the rumors surrounding Lord Illingworth's aim for being a foreign ambassador, while Lady Hunstanton sends a letter through her footman to Gerald's mother, inviting her to the party. Gerald offers to take Hester for a walk, leaving the remaining guests to gossip further about their social lives. Lady Hunstanton and Lady Stutfield comment on the yet unseen Lord Illingworth's amoral qualities towards women when the man himself enters the terrace. He declines their thanks for his hiring of Gerald Arbuthnot and says that he hired him out of personal interest. Lord Illingworth remains near Mrs. Allonby during the entire exchange until the two of them leave for the conservatory together, following a discussion of Hester's background and wealthy father. A footman enters with a letter from Mrs. Arbuthnot, stating that she will arrive to the party after dinner. When Illingworth and Mrs. Allonby return, the remaining guests have already moved to have tea in another room. The two characters have a witty conversation involving marriage and women and men until Gerald and Hester enter the room. They have some short small talk, and Lord Illingworth and Mrs. Allonby are again left alone. Their aim of discussion turns toward Hester when Mrs. Allonby reprehends the young American for her casual talk of being eighteen and a Puritan. Lord Illingworth expresses that he rather admires Hester's beauty and actually uses the conversation to assert his flirtations toward Mrs. Allonby, claiming that he has never met a woman so puritanical as Hester that she would steadfastly resist all and any advances. Mrs. Allonby asserts that Hester is sincere in her desire to be left alone, but Illingworth interprets her remarks as a playful challenge. Lord Illingworth notices Mrs. Arbuthnot's letter lying on a table and remarks that the handwriting on the envelope seems familiar. When Mrs. Allonby asks who the handwriting reminds him of, he carelessly mentions "a woman of no importance."

Recollections and Reflections by a Woman of No Importance

This is a reproduction of the original artefact. Generally these books are created from careful scans of the original. This allows us to preserve the book accurately and present it in the way the author intended.

Recollections and Reflections by a Woman of No Importance

This is a reproduction of the original artefact. Generally these books are created from careful scans of the original. This allows us to preserve the book accurately and present it in the way the author intended. Since the original versions are generally quite old, there may occasionally be certain imperfections within these reproductions. We're happy to make these classics available again for future generations to enjoy!

A woman of no importance An ideal husband

HESTER You of all women I have ever known . [ They move towards the door
leading into ... Who was it ? MRS . ARBUTINOT [ Turning round . ) Oh ! no one .
No one in particular . A man of no importance . CURTAIN . An Ideal Husband .

A woman of no importance  An ideal husband


Lady Windermere s fan A woman of no importance

What a curious handwriting ! It reminds me of the handwriting of a woman I used
to know years ago . MRS . ALLONBY Who ? LORD ILLINGWORTA Oh ! no one .
No one in particular . A woman of no importance . [ Throws leiter down , and ...

Lady Windermere s fan  A woman of no importance


The Importance of Being Earnest and Other Plays

Offers newly edited texts of five of the British playwright's works, including the great farcial comedy "The Importance of Being Earnest."

The Importance of Being Earnest and Other Plays

Offers newly edited texts of five of the British playwright's works, including the great farcial comedy "The Importance of Being Earnest."

Oscar Wilde in the 1990s

Part Two : Theater History and Criticism Kerry Powell Kerry Powell , in Oscar
Wilde and the Theatre of the 1890s , uncovers ... In eight chapters , Powell
provides shrewd insights , high points being his discussion of A Woman of No
Importance ...

Oscar Wilde in the 1990s

An examination of the most significant literary criticism on Wilde at the turn of the century.

A Woman of No Importance

A Woman of No Importance

"A Woman of No Importance" by Oscar O'Flahertie Wills Wilde. Published by Good Press. Good Press publishes a wide range of titles that encompasses every genre. From well-known classics & literary fiction and non-fiction to forgotten−or yet undiscovered gems−of world literature, we issue the books that need to be read. Each Good Press edition has been meticulously edited and formatted to boost readability for all e-readers and devices. Our goal is to produce eBooks that are user-friendly and accessible to everyone in a high-quality digital format.

The Works

The Works


A Woman of No Importance Illustrated

A Woman of No Importance is a play by Irish playwright Oscar Wilde. The play premièred on 19 April 1893 at London's Haymarket Theatre. Like Wilde's other society plays, it satirizes English upper-class society.

A Woman of No Importance Illustrated

A Woman of No Importance is a play by Irish playwright Oscar Wilde. The play premièred on 19 April 1893 at London's Haymarket Theatre. Like Wilde's other society plays, it satirizes English upper-class society. It has been performed on stages in Europe and North America since his death in 1900.

Oscar Wilde in Quotation

A Woman of No Importance (Plays, p¡34) 2882. ... is it a sprightly lady-journalist
who led him astray? Or was it one of those typical English women with their “fatal
gift of duty?” Letter to Robert Ross (Letters, p¡¡92) 2883. GERALD: But do you ...

Oscar Wilde in Quotation

“He had that rarest of all things, common sense.” And in the case of Oscar Wilde he also had a gift for delivering this common sense in sometimes pithy but always memorable statements. One of the world’s most unforgettable authors, Oscar Wilde had a comment for any and every occasion, many of which are quoted here. From art and actors to vice and virtue, this volume organizes 3109 Oscar Wilde quotations by subject matter, effectively providing a new way to enjoy Wilde’s considerable literary legacy. Quotations are taken from Wilde’s works, including The Importance of Being Earnest and The Picture of Dorian Gray, his correspondence, magazine articles and newspaper editorials. Some, which are otherwise not immediately verifiable, are garnered from reliable secondary sources. Sixty-seven chapters deal with topics as varied as death, domesticity, friends and enemies, with the source of each quote duly noted. The work, a fascinating read of Wilde’s acute observations, is indexed.