According to Luke

Christ and Maitreya Buddha 10. the Mystery of Golgotha as a New Form of Initiation Rudolf Steiner's Ten Lectures on the Gospel of Luke by Robert A. McDermott About this Edition

According to Luke

10 lectures, Basel, September 15-26, 1909 (CW 114) Rudolf Steiner was born with clairvoyant capacities, but it was not until he was forty that he could connect his inner experiences with Jesus Christ. After that "solemn festival of knowledge," as he described it in his Autobiography, Steiner received ceaseless revelations about the significance of the Christ's incarnation. For the next twenty years, he spoke of the hidden background to all four gospels, the Book of Revelations, and even what he called the Fifth Gospel, read directly from the spirit worlds. These lectures present the most accessible and illuminating of Steiner's revelations about the significance of the Christ for the spiritual development of humanity. He discusses the link between the Buddha and the Christ, which unites Buddhism and Christianity--not in theory but in the spiritual activities of those two beings. Steiner also describes the relationship between the Greek Mystery traditions and the Mystery of Golgotha: "A sign was to be placed before them as well, a sign that would now be enacted before the eyes of all humankind. The 'mystical death, ' which had been a ceremonial act in the Mystery temples for hundreds and thousands of years, would now be presented on the great stage of world history. Everything that had taken place in the secrecy of initiation temples was brought into the open as a single event on Golgotha." Utilizing a historical overview, revealing the relationship between the great religious traditions, and how they have conspired together for the good of humanity, Steiner never loses sight of the Gospel's great inner meaning, as echoed in the Gospel of St. Luke: "The revelation of the spiritual worlds from the Heights and its answering reflection from human hearts brings peace to all whose purpose upon the evolving Earth is to develop good will." Contents: Introduction by Robert A. McDermott 1. The Four Gospels in the Light of Anthroposophy 2. The Luke Gospel As an Expression of Love and Compassion 3. Buddha's Contribution to Humanity 4. Formation of the Nathan-Jesus Child 5. Contributions of the Nathan Jesus from Buddha and Zarathustra 6. Elijah, John the Baptist, and Zarathustra 7. Christ, the Great Mystery of Earth Evolution 8. Illness and Healing in Luke and in the Evolution of Consciousness 9. Christ and Maitreya Buddha 10. the Mystery of Golgotha as a New Form of Initiation Rudolf Steiner's Ten Lectures on the Gospel of Luke by Robert A. McDermott About this Edition

The Gospel According to Luke

This series of commentaries on the New English Bible is designed for use in schools and colleges, and for the minister and the layman.

The Gospel According to Luke

This series of commentaries on the New English Bible is designed for use in schools and colleges, and for the minister and the layman. Each volume comments on one book, or a few short books, of the Bible, and in each the text is given in full. Sections of text and commentary alternate, so that the reader does not have to keep two books open, or turn from one part of the book to the other, or refer to a commentary in small type at the foot of the page. Great care has been taken to see that the commentary is suitable for the student and the layman: there is no Greek or Hebrew, and no strings of biblical references, but the commentary does convey the latest and best scholarship. The general editors all have experience of teaching or examining in school and working with adults.

According to Luke

In this Gospel guide we are provided with the latest balanced scholarship on Luke's writing in an accessible form.

According to Luke

Amidst the confusion and doubt that the contemporary world casts on our Christian witness, a return to the Gospel brings clarity and a sure foundation. In the Gospel of Luke we find a model for the Church, a model equally valid for each generation. Well known for his teaching and preaching skills, Ivan Clutterbuck invites us to study the Gospel of Luke as a whole. Working through the text from start to finish we understand the full implications of how Jesus preached and organised his kingdom. In this Gospel guide we are provided with the latest balanced scholarship on Luke's writing in an accessible form. The last thirty years have seen a new concentration on the historical person of Jesus that has overturned much of the speculative biblical criticism of the past that seemed to undermine faith itself. Only by concentrating on the teaching and ministry of Jesus, so clearly set out by Luke, do we find the bedrock of the Christian message. Ivan Clutterbuck has been a priest of the Church of England for over sixty years. He has served both as an army and naval chaplain and has taught in several public schools. From 1966-74 he was Organising Secretary of the Church Union.

Gospel According to Luke 10 24

In “joining the spirit to the letter” and scholarship to faith, this two-volume commentary on Luke has, as the Journal of Biblical Literature predicted, “rapidly and deservedly become the standard work on Luke.” Luke’s unique ...

Gospel According to Luke 10 24

In this second of two volumes on the Gospel According to Luke, beginning with chapter 10, Joseph A. Fitzmyer builds on the exhaustive introduction, definitive new translation, and extensive notes and commentary presented in his first volume. Fitzmyer brings to the task his mastery of ancient and modern languages, his encyclopedic knowledge of the sources, and his intimate acquaintance with the questions and issues raised by the third Synoptic Gospel. In “joining the spirit to the letter” and scholarship to faith, this two-volume commentary on Luke has, as the Journal of Biblical Literature predicted, “rapidly and deservedly become the standard work on Luke.” Luke’s unique literary and linguistic features, its relation to the other Gospels and the book of Acts, and its distinctive theological slant are discussed in detail by the author. The Jesus of Luke’s Gospel speaks to the Greco-Roman world of first-century Christians, giving the followers of Jesus a reason for remaining faithful. Fitzmyer’s exposition of Luke helps modern-day Christians hear the Good News afresh and understand it like never before.

According to Luke

This is, then, an historical account. But what does Luke’s history of Jesus mean? And how can we be certain that we have understood the message that he has presented in his account of Christ’s life?

According to Luke

With a profound understanding of both the Scriptures and the classical world that influenced Luke, this exposition leads us through the artistry of Luke’s presentation. However familiar the terrain of this Gospel, we will find that having an experienced guide makes a difference. By bringing out the significance of the narrative as a whole, David Gooding’s analysis will help us to arrive at a confident understanding of Luke’s message and open up insightful lines of application at each step along they way. Right from the start of his Gospel Luke makes it clear that the story of Jesus is neither ancient myth nor contemporary fable. It is straightforward history. To emphasize this he provides us with historical co–ordinates. He informs us, for example, that when John began publicly to introduce Christ to His nation it was in the fifteenth year of Emperor Tiberius’ reign, while Pontius Pilate was governor of Judaea, during the high–priesthood of Annas and Caiaphas. This is, then, an historical account. But what does Luke’s history of Jesus mean? And how can we be certain that we have understood the message that he has presented in his account of Christ’s life? David Gooding asks us to begin by recalling that Luke is an ancient and not a modern historian. A modern historian might compile a list of the things that Jesus did and taught, and then add his own explanations. But Luke has more in common with ancient historians such as Thucydides and writers of Old Testament books such as Judges and 1 and 2 Samuel. With minimal comment, he has grouped the material about Christ in a way that leads thoughtful readers to discover for themselves the point and purpose of each incident. Luke is, then, both historian and artist. It has often been lamented that Christ’s public ministry on earth was so short–lived, and His death at the hands of His enemies a tragedy. But Luke will not have it so. Following Christ’s own statements, he divides his Gospel into two parts: the coming of Christ from Glory into our world, and His going back to Glory. David Gooding shows that by arranging the events of each part into discreet stages and movements, Luke is proclaiming that Christ was carrying out a definite mission – His going, by way of His cross, resurrection and ascension was as deliberate as His coming.

The Gospel According to Luke Part One

The Gospel of Luke demonstrates the universal nature of Jesus’ mission and the compassion of God.

The Gospel According to Luke  Part One

The Gospel of Luke demonstrates the universal nature of Jesus’ mission and the compassion of God. Part One of this study includes Luke 1:1─11:54, taking the reader from the infancy narratives of John the Baptist and Jesus to their births and then to the Galilean ministry of Jesus. Commentary, study and reflection questions, prayer and access to recorded lectures are included. 6 sessions.

The Gospel according to Luke

In keeping with the Pillar New Testament Commentary’s distinctive character, this volume by James R. Edwards on Luke gives special attention to the Third Gospel’s vocabulary and historical setting, its narrative purpose and unique ...

The Gospel according to Luke

In keeping with the Pillar New Testament Commentary’s distinctive character, this volume by James R. Edwards on Luke gives special attention to the Third Gospel’s vocabulary and historical setting, its narrative purpose and unique themes, and its theological significance for the church and believers today. Though Luke is often thought to have a primarily Gentile focus, Edwards counterbalances that perspective by citing numerous evidences of Luke’s overarching interest in depicting Jesus as the fulfillment of God’s providential work in the history of Israel, and he even considers the possibility that Luke himself was a Jew. In several excursuses Edwards discusses particular topics, including Luke’s infancy narratives, the mission of Jesus as the way of salvation, and Luke’s depiction of the universal scope of the gospel. While fully conversant with all the latest scholarship, Edwards writes in a lively, fluent style that will commend this commentary to ministers, students, scholars, and many other serious Bible readers.

The Gospel According to Luke

The Gospel According to Luke is the first part of a two-volume compilation that continues the biblical history of God's dealings with humanity found in the Old Testament.

The Gospel According to Luke

The Gospel According to Luke is the first part of a two-volume compilation that continues the biblical history of God's dealings with humanity found in the Old Testament. It depicts how Jesus fulfills God's promise of salvation to Israel and then to the Gentiles. Luke shows that the preaching and teaching of the early Church representatives are grounded in the preaching and teaching of Jesus during His historical ministry. The Gospel According to Luke, together with Acts of the Apostles, delivers the history of first-century Christianity. This continuity between the historical ministry of Jesus and the ministry of the Apostles is Luke's way of guaranteeing the fidelity of the Church's teaching to the teaching of Jesus.

The Gospel According to Luke

In this fourth volume of the Baylor-Mohr Siebeck Studies in Early Christianity, Michael Wolter provides a detailed, verse-by-verse interpretation of the Third Evangelist.

The Gospel According to Luke

In this fourth volume of the Baylor-Mohr Siebeck Studies in Early Christianity, Michael Wolter provides a detailed, verse-by-verse interpretation of the Third Evangelist. Wolter's commentary fully complements the great tradition of "Handbooks of the New Testament" published by Mohr Siebeck. Replacing the third edition of Erich Klostermann's commentary on Luke, Wolter's volume rightly joins those by Conzelmann (Acts), Käsemann (Romans), and Lietzmann (1 Corinthians) in this venerable series. Wolter's approach to a sustained reading of Luke's Gospel is comprehensive. He carefully places Luke's narrative of Jesus in its cultural context, paying close attention to the relationship of the Gospel with its Jewish and Greco-Roman environment. Wolter performs form-critical and narrative analysis of the specific stories; however, Wolter also emphasizes Luke as a theologian and his Gospel as a work of theology. Wolter recognizes how Luke's narrative of Jesus forms the first part of a unified work--the Acts of Apostles being the second--that represents a new moment in Israel's history. But in surprising new ways, Wolter makes clear that it is God alone who works in and through the words and deeds of Jesus to bring salvation to Israel. His commentary shows that Luke succeeds in preserving the history of Jesus and its theological impact and that this history stands on equal footing with the history of early Christianity. Wolter's thorough, careful reading follows Luke as the Evangelist seeks to explain how the fulfillment of the Old Testament promises of God for Israel results in a parting of the ways between the Christian church on the one side and Judaism on the other. Scholars and students alike will benefit from access to new German scholarship now available to English-language audiences.

The Gospel According to Luke

In The Gospel According to Luke, Lukather tells the Toto story: how a group of high school friends formed the band in 1977 and went on to sell more than 40 million records worldwide.

The Gospel According to Luke

No one explodes one of the longest-held misconceptions of music history better than Steve Lukather and his band Toto. The dominant pop-culture sound of the late-1970s and '80s was not in fact the smash and sneer of punk, but a slick, polished amalgam of rock and R&B that was first staked out on Boz Scaggs' Silk Degrees. That album was shaped in large part by the founding members of Toto, who were emerging as the most in-demand elite session muso-crew in LA, and further developed on the band's self-titled three-million-selling debut smash of 1978. A string of hits followed for the band going into the '80s and beyond. Running parallel to this, as stellar session players, Lukather and band-mates David Paich, Jeff Porcaro and Steve Porcaro were also the creative linchpins on some of the most successful, influential and enduring records of the era. In The Gospel According to Luke, Lukather tells the Toto story: how a group of high school friends formed the band in 1977 and went on to sell more than 40 million records worldwide. He also lifts the lid on what really went on behind the closed studio doors and shows the unique creative processes of some of the most legendary names in music: from Quincy Jones, Paul McCartney, Stevie Nicks and Elton John to Miles Davis, Joni Mitchell, Don Henley, Roger Waters and Aretha Franklin. And yet, Lukather's extraordinary tale encompasses the dark side of the American Dream. Engaging, incisive and often hilarious, The Gospel According to Luke is no ordinary rock memoir. It is the real thing . . .

Gospel According to Luke

Seeking and saving is the peculiar work of Jesus, and it is about this that we read throughout the Gospel according to Luke.

Gospel According to Luke

The Gospel according to Luke emphasizes the humanity of the Lord, whose mission was to seek and save what had been lost, 19.10. On each page we find ourselves face to face with the One who expresses divine love in "words of grace" and "glorious things", 4.22, 13.17. His passionate heart for fallen man manifests itself in both deeds and words. What Spirit-enlightened mind can fail to see that there is deep meaning in parables like those of the prodigal son and the good Samaritan? Seeking and saving is the peculiar work of Jesus, and it is about this that we read throughout the Gospel according to Luke. As one who was very close to Paul, and who is said in Colossians 4.14 to be the "beloved physician," Luke offers beautiful details, especially in writing of miracles and compassionate gestures; for example in the account of the deceased of Nain, 7.12. Until the end of the narrative, we are considering the Lord Jesus as one who, by life and tongue, speaks in terms that we can understand and brings us close to God as it were. This powerful worker declares himself, and Luke exposes this declaration by writing things in order from their origin, as he says in 1.3. Others had tried to relate "the things that between us have been very true" and Lucas took on the task of ordering them correctly, since he knew them from the beginning. He is not willing to leave them in the form of an oral tradition, but sees the need for a permanent and invariable exposition so that Teófilo would have certainty about it. We too do well to plot these things accurately. As far as we know, Luke is the only Gentile writer in the Bible. He writes in narration to another Gentile, Theophilus, and our interest deepens as we realize that this good news is addressed to us Gentiles, as Israel ignored it. https: //amzn.to/2Xdtq2m

The Gospel According to Luke 19 28 Through 24 53

In this volume, the study of Luke 19:28–19:27 followed that pattern exactly. This volume completes the study of Luke, following volumes on 1:1–9:50 and 9:51–19:27.

The Gospel According to Luke 19 28 Through 24 53

The Bible studies I chose to do came about in answer to a request from my first congregation out of seminary. I consistently sought to present a serious, somewhat scholarly, approach to the interested among my parishioners. I would take a book in the Bible to study, assume it was written or edited to be read from the beginning, and make sense to the reader in that way. I attempted to discover for myself and my group what the book sought to convey. In this volume, the study of Luke 19:28–19:27 followed that pattern exactly. This volume completes the study of Luke, following volumes on 1:1–9:50 and 9:51–19:27.

The Gospel According to Luke A Modern Bible Commentary

There are lots of Bible commentaries on the Book of Luke, but BookCaps offers one of the first electronic Bible Commentaries for the modern reader.

The Gospel According to Luke  A Modern Bible Commentary

There are lots of Bible commentaries on the Book of Luke, but BookCaps offers one of the first electronic Bible Commentaries for the modern reader. This commentary includes an introduction to the book (including the history of the text, the structure, and the themes), a chapter by chapter summary, and discussion questions. BookCaps Bible Commentaries are nondenominational study guides for people who are just getting into the Bible for the first time, or who just want to know a little more.

According to Luke

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According to Luke


The Gospel According To Luke

Luke continues to challenge our lives. Focusing on Jesus and his earthly ministry among the early church, Michael, F. Patella, OSB, opens the Gospel of Luke to the 21st-century reader.

The Gospel According To Luke

Luke continues to challenge our lives. Focusing on Jesus and his earthly ministry among the early church, Michael, F. Patella, OSB, opens the Gospel of Luke to the 21st-century reader. Patella presents literary, textual, and historical criticism in a readable manner to give readers a solid background for the Lukan Gospel. A brief introduction informs reader of Luke's literary technique, Luke as an evangelist, and other historical data. Chapters are "The Prologue (1:1-4)," "The Infancy Narrative (1:5-2:52)," "Preparation for the Public Ministry (3:1-4:13)," "The Ministry in Galilee (4:!4-9:50)," "The Journey to Jerusalem (9:51019:27)," "The Teaching Ministry in Jerusalem (19:28-21:38)," "The Passion (22:1-23:56)," "The Resurrection (24:1-53)." Also includes questions for discussion.