Adat and Indigeneity in Indonesia

The authors of this volume investigate how differently structured communities - socially, politically and religiously - and associations reposition themselves vis-à-vis others, especially the state, not only by drawing on adat for ...

Adat and Indigeneity in Indonesia

A number of UN conventions and declarations (on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, the Protection and Promotion of the Diversity of Cultural Expressions and the World Heritage Conventions) can be understood as instruments of international governance to promote democracy and social justice worldwide. In Indonesia (as in many other countries), these international agreements have encouraged the self-assertion of communities that had been oppressed and deprived of their land, especially during the New Order regime (1966-1998). More than 2,000 communities in Indonesia who define themselves as masyarakat adat or “indigenous peoples” had already joined the Indigenous Peoples’ Alliance of the Archipelago” (AMAN) by 2013. In their efforts to gain recognition and selfdetermination, these communities are supported by international donors and international as well as national NGOs by means of development programmes. In the definition of masyarakat adat, “culture” or adat plays an important role in the communities’ self-definition. Based on particular characteristics of their adat, the asset of their culture, they try to distinguish themselves from others in order to substantiate their claims for the restitution of their traditional rights and property (namely land and other natural resources) from the state. The authors of this volume investigate how differently structured communities - socially, politically and religiously - and associations reposition themselves vis-à-vis others, especially the state, not only by drawing on adat for achieving particular goals, but also dignity and a better future.

Adat and Indigeneity in Indonesia

The authors of this volume investigate how differently structured communities - socially, politically and religiously - and associations reposition themselves vis-à-vis others, especially the state, not only by drawing on adat for ...

Adat and Indigeneity in Indonesia

A number of UN conventions and declarations (on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, the Protection and Promotion of the Diversity of Cultural Expressions and the World Heritage Conventions) can be understood as instruments of international governance to promote democracy and social justice worldwide. In Indonesia (as in many other countries), these international agreements have encouraged the self-assertion of communities that had been oppressed and deprived of their land, especially during the New Order regime (1966-1998). More than 2,000 communities in Indonesia who define themselves as masyarakat adat or "indigenous peoples" had already joined the Indigenous Peoples' Alliance of the Archipelago" (AMAN) by 2013. In their efforts to gain recognition and self-determination, these communities are supported by international donors and international as well as national NGOs by means of development programmes. In the definition of masyarakat adat, "culture" or adat plays an important role in the communities' self-definition. Based on particular characteristics of their adat, the asset of their culture, they try to distinguish themselves from others in order to substantiate their claims for the restitution of their traditional rights and property (namely land and other natural resources) from the state. The authors of this volume investigate how differently structured communities - socially, politically and religiously - and associations reposition themselves vis-à-vis others, especially the state, not only by drawing on adat for achieving particular goals, but also dignity and a better future.

Adat and Indigeneity in Indonesia Culture and Entitlements Between Heteronomy and Self Ascription

This work was published by Saint Philip Street Press pursuant to a Creative Commons license permitting commercial use. All rights not granted by the work's license are retained by the author or authors.

Adat and Indigeneity in Indonesia   Culture and Entitlements Between Heteronomy and Self Ascription

A number of UN conventions and declarations (on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, the Protection and Promotion of the Diversity of Cultural Expressions and the World Heritage Conventions) can be understood as instruments of international governance to promote democracy and social justice worldwide. In Indonesia (as in many other countries), these international agreements have encouraged the self-assertion of communities that had been oppressed and deprived of their land, especially during the New Order regime (1966-1998). More than 2,000 communities in Indonesia who define themselves as masyarakat adat or "indigenous peoples" had already joined the Indigenous Peoples' Alliance of the Archipelago" (AMAN) by 2013. In their efforts to gain recognition and selfdetermination, these communities are supported by international donors and international as well as national NGOs by means of development programmes. In the definition of masyarakat adat, "culture" or adat plays an important role in the communities' self-definition. Based on particular characteristics of their adat, the asset of their culture, they try to distinguish themselves from others in order to substantiate their claims for the restitution of their traditional rights and property (namely land and other natural resources) from the state. The authors of this volume investigate how differently structured communities - socially, politically and religiously - and associations reposition themselves vis-à-vis others, especially the state, not only by drawing on adat for achieving particular goals, but also dignity and a better future. This work was published by Saint Philip Street Press pursuant to a Creative Commons license permitting commercial use. All rights not granted by the work's license are retained by the author or authors.

Traditional Communities in Indonesia

Rachel Haverfield, 'Hak Ulayat and the State: Land Acquisition in Indonesia'(Hak Ulayat) in Tim Lindsey (ed), Indonesia Law ... Adat and Indigeneity in Indonesia: Culture and Entitlements between Heteronomy and Self-ascription Göttingen ...

Traditional Communities in Indonesia

This book explores the ambiguous legal status of traditional – adat – communities in Indonesia and their informal, traditional rights to communal – ulayat – land. It discusses the lack of recognition of adat communities and their legal rights in the Indonesian constitution, surveys legal consideration of informal legal rights both in Indonesia and elsewhere, and examines how thinking about these issues has evolved over time in Indonesia. It provides an in-depth study of the ways that government policies on adat communities are developed, changed and implemented, and how different actors give meaning to these policies, particularly government bodies with authority to manage land and forests, which exercise discretion as to the operational implementation of ideas about adat groups as legal persons and ulayat land rights as land title, thus enabling their exploitation by government and business. The book highlights how these issues are becoming more pressing as problems relating to legal personhood and rights to traditional customary land are increasingly giving rise to violent conflict, dispossession and marginalisation. It also demonstrates how adat communities can take action, and are doing so, to protect their legal positions.

Rethinking Power Relations in Indonesia

Adat and Indigeneity in Indonesia: Culture and Entitlements between Heteronomy and Self-Ascription, Göttingen: Universitätsverlag, pp. 81–98. Gunawan, I.K. (2004) The Politics of the Indonesian Rainforest: A Rise of Forest Conflicts in ...

Rethinking Power Relations in Indonesia

Since colonial rule, the island of Java served as Indonesia’s imagined centre and prime example of development, while the Outer Islands were constructed as the state’s marginalised periphery. Recent processes of democratisation and regional autonomy, however, have significantly changed the power relations that once produced the marginality of the Outer Islands. This book explores processes of political, economic and cultural transformations in Indonesia, emphasizing their implications for centre-periphery relations from the perspective of the archipelago’s ‘margins’. Structured along three central themes, the book first provides theoretical contributions to the understanding of marginality in Indonesia. The second part focuses on political transformation processes and their implications for the Outer Islands. The third section investigates the dynamics caused by economic changes on Indonesia’s periphery. Chapters writtten by experts in the field offer examples from various regions, which demonstrate how power relations between centre and periphery are getting challenged, contested and reshaped. The book fills a gap in the literature by analysing the implications of the recent transformation processes for the construction of marginality on Indonesia’s Outer Islands.

Occupy the Earth

In S. D. Jamie & H. David (Eds.), The revival of tradition in Indonesian politics: The deploymnet of adat from ... In B. Hauser-Schaublin (Ed.), Adat and indigeneity in Indonesia: Culture and entitlements between heteronomy and ...

Occupy the Earth

Concerns about environmental risks have focused the minds of a generation. New movements are emerging to challenge those who would put profits before the planet. This volume represents the cutting edge of international research on global environmental movements and contributes to the on-going debates which may shape our future.

The Cultural Dimension of Peace

Indigenous Peoples Alliance of the Indonesian Archipelago The masyarakat adat or indigenous peoples movement in Indonesia is t closely linked to an international movement that culminated in the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous ...

The Cultural Dimension of Peace

This study outlines the emerging cultural turn in Peace Studies and provides a critical understanding of the cultural dimension of reconciliation. Taking an anthropological view on decentralization and peacebuilding in Indonesia, it sets new standards for an interdisciplinary research field.

The Aboriginal People of Peninsular Malaysia

Adat and indigeneity in Indonesia: Culture and entitlements between heteronomy and self-ascription. Göttingen: Universitätsverlag Göttingen. 3 See Pulitano, E. (2012). Indigenous rights in the age of the UN Declaration.

The Aboriginal People of Peninsular Malaysia

To date, most studies of Malaysia’s aboriginal people, the Orang Asli, have studied the community in either the rural or forest settings. This book, however, outlines the dynamics of Orang Asli migration to Kuala Lumpur – Malaysia’s most urbanised region – and explores the lived experiences of these individuals in the urban space. The book begins by charting the history of the Orang Asli under British colonial rule followed by the community’s experiences under the Malaysian government, in an attempt to provide a deeper understanding of the economic and social complexities facing the Orang Asli today. Based on extensive original research, the book goes on to discuss the interesting changes taking place among urban Orang Asli migrants with regards to gender dynamics, while exploring the unique ways in which these urban indigenous migrants maintain close links with their home communities in the rural spaces of Peninsular Malaysia. The book concludes by assessing how research on the urban Orang Asli fits into broader studies of urban and contemporary indigeneity in both Malaysia and abroad.

Indigeneity In India

In the integral translation of the 1999 Indonesian text into English masyarakat adat is consequently translated as indigenous peoples (Down to Earth, special issue 1999). In some of its most recent ...

Indigeneity In India

First published in 2006. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.

Shifting Cultivation Policies

Adat and Indigeneity in Indonesia: Culture and Entitlements between Heteronomy and Self-Ascription,Göttingen Studies in Cultural Property (vol. 7), Universitätsverlag Göttingen, Germany, pp5-15 Ishikawa, N. (2010) 'State-making and ...

Shifting Cultivation Policies

Shifting cultivation supports around 200 million people in the Asia-Pacific region alone. It is often regarded as a primitive and inefficient form of agriculture that destroys forests, causes soil erosion and robs lowland areas of water. These misconceptions and their policy implications need to be challenged. Swidden farming could support carbon sequestration and conservation of land, biodiversity and cultural heritage. This comprehensive analysis of past and present policy highlights successes and failures and emphasizes the importance of getting it right for the future. This book is enhanced with supplementary resources. The addendum chapters can be found at: www.cabi.org/openresources/91797

Words in Motion

I dare to offer the suggestion that, indirectly, Indonesian debates over ''adat'' helped forge the forms of ... Such cultural nationalism gave a heady charge to the possibilities for indigenous organizing that took off in the 1970s.

Words in Motion

On the premise that words have the power to make worlds, each essay in this book follows a word as it travels around the globe and across time. Scholars from five disciplines address thirteen societies to highlight the social and political life of words in Asia, Europe, and the Middle East, from the mid-nineteenth century to the present. The approach is consciously experimental, in that rigorously tracking specific words in specific settings frequently leads in unexpected directions and alters conventional depictions of global modernity. Such words as security in Brazil, responsibility in Japan, community in Thailand, and hijāb in France changed the societies in which they moved even as the words were changed by them. Some words threatened to launch wars, as injury did in imperial Britain’s relations with China in the nineteenth century. Others, such as secularism, worked in silence to agitate for political change in twentieth-century Morocco. Words imposed or imported from abroad could be transformed by those who wielded them to oppose the very powers that first introduced them, as happened in Turkey, Indonesia, and the Philippines. Taken together, this selection of fourteen essays reveals commonality as well as distinctiveness across modern societies, making the world look different from the interdisciplinary and transnational perspective of “words in motion.” Contributors. Mona Abaza, Itty Abraham, Partha Chatterjee, Carol Gluck, Huri Islamoglu, Claudia Koonz, Lydia H. Liu, Driss Maghraoui, Vicente L. Rafael, Craig J. Reynolds, Seteney Shami, Alan Tansman, Kasian Tejapira, Anna Lowenhaupt Tsing

Islamic Law in the Indian Ocean World

Brigitta Hauser-Schäublin, “Adat and Indigeneity in Indonesia: Culture and Entitlements between Heteronomy and Self-Ascription,” Journal of Social Issues in Southeast Asia 29, no. 3 (2014): 769. 97. H.G. Schulte Nodholt, Bali, ...

Islamic Law in the Indian Ocean World

This book explores the ways in which Muslim communities across the Indian Ocean world produced and shaped Islamic law and its texts, ideas and practices in their local, regional, imperial, national and transregional contexts. With a focus on the production and transmission of Islamic law in the Indian Ocean, the chapters in this book draw from and add to recent discourses on the legal histories and anthropologies of the Indian Ocean rim as well as to the conversations on global Islamic circulations. By doing so, this book argues for the importance of Islamic legal thoughts and practices of the so-called "peripheries" to the core and kernel of Islamic traditions and the urgency of addressing their long-existing role in the making of the historical and human experience of the religion. Islamic law was and is not merely brought to, but also produced in the Indian Ocean world through constant and critical engagements. The book takes a long-term and transregional perspective for a better understanding of the ways in which the oceanic Muslims have historically developed their religious, juridical and intellectual traditions and continue to shape their lives within the frameworks of their religion. Transregional and transdisciplinary in its approach, this book will be of interest to scholars of Islamic Studies, Indian Ocean Studies, Legal History and Legal Anthropology, Area Studies of South and Southeast Asia and East Africa.

Routledge Handbook of Asian Law

masyarakat adat in various places in Indonesia have utilised a variety of resistance tactics. Although most of the resistance operations of masyarakat adat have been led by male leaders, female leaders have emerged in several places.

Routledge Handbook of Asian Law

The Routledge Handbook of Asian Law is a cutting-edge and comprehensive resource which surveys the interdisciplinary field of Asian Law. Written by an international team of experts, the chapters within cover issues as diverse as family law and Islamic courts, decentralisation and the revival of traditional forms of law, discourses on the rule of law, human rights, corporate governance and environmental protection The volume is divided into five parts covering: Asia in Law, and the Humanities and Social Sciences; The Political Economy of Law in Asia - Law in the Context of Asian Development; Asian traditions and their transformations; Law, the environment, and access to land and natural resources; People in Asia and their rights. Offering an overview of the full spectrum of Law in Asia, the Handbook is an invaluable resource for academics, researchers, lawyers, graduate and undergraduate students studying this ever-evolving field.

Political Ecology of REDD in Indonesia

“Today we Occupy the Plantation – Tomorrow Jakarta”: Indigeneity, land and oil palm plantations in Jambi. In: B. HauserSchäublin, ed. Adat and Indigeneity in Indonesia – Culture and Entitlements between Heteronomy and Self-Ascription.

Political Ecology of REDD  in Indonesia

Indonesia’s commitment to reducing land-based greenhouse gas emissions significantly includes the expansion of conservation areas, but these developments are not free of conflicts. This book provides a comprehensive analysis of agrarian conflicts in the context of the implementation of REDD+ (Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation) and forest carbon offsetting in Indonesia, a country where deforestation is a major issue. The author analyzes new kinds of transnational agrarian conflicts which have strong implications for global environmental justice in the REDD+ pilot province of Jambi on the island of Sumatra. The chapters cover: the rescaling of the governance of forests; privatization of conservation; and the transnational dimensions of agrarian conflicts and peasants' resistance in the context of REDD+. The book builds on an innovative conceptual approach linking political ecology, politics of scale and theories of power. It fills an important knowledge and research gap by focusing on the socially differentiated impacts of REDD+ and new forest carbon offsetting initiatives in Southeast Asia, providing a multi-scalar perspective. It is aimed at scholars in the areas of political ecology, human geography, climate change mitigation, forest and natural resource management, as well as environmental justice and agrarian studies.

Human Environment Relations and Politics in Indonesia

Thus, indigeneity and adat rights have become battle cries in the struggles by indigenous groups to defend and ... Indonesia is a multifaceted phenomenon that is captured in Kaskija's (2002) notion of “cultural reflexivity” (91), ...

Human   Environment Relations and Politics in Indonesia

This book analyses how people in Kalimantan, the Indonesian part of the island of Borneo, relate to their environment in different political and historical contexts. Drawing on multi-sited ethnographic studies of Dayak people, the indigenous inhabitants of Borneo, the book examines how human-environment relationships differ and collide. These "conflicting ecologies" are based on people's relation to the "environment", which encompasses the non-human realm in the widest sense, including forests, rivers, land, natural resources, animals and spirits. The author argues that relationality and power are decisive factors for the understanding and analysis of peoples’ ecologies. The book integrates different theoretical approaches, sheds light upon the environmental transformation taking place in Indonesia, as well as the social exclusion it entails, and highlights the conceptual shortcomings of universalistic concepts of human-environment relations. An exploration of evolving human-nature relations, this book will be of interest to academics studying political ecology, environmental anthropology, sustainability sciences, political sciences, development studies, human geography, human ecology, Southeast Asian studies, and Asian studies.

Community Environment and Local Governance in Indonesia

... 229–232, 244, 246n15, 247n25; see also adat, community, indigeneity Ihromi, T.O. 123 illegal logging practices 31–2, 33, 183, 231, 248n29: economic data 152–3; see also forestry ILO (2001) 209 ILO (2004) 178 indigeneity 95–101, 128, ...

Community  Environment and Local Governance in Indonesia

This book explores the forces reconfiguring local resource governance in Indonesia since 1998, drawing together original field research undertaken in a decade of dramatic political change. Case studies from across Indonesia’s diverse cultural and ecological landscapes focus on the most significant resource sectors – agriculture, fisheries, forestry, mining and tourism –providing a rare in-depth view of the dynamics shaping social and environmental outcomes in these varied contexts. Debates surrounding the ‘tragedy of the commons’ and environmental governance have focused on institutional considerations of how to craft resource management arrangements in order to further the policy objectives of economic efficiency, social equity and environmental sustainability. The studies in this volume reveal the complexity of resource security issues affecting local communities and user groups in Indonesia as they engage with wider institutional frameworks in a context driven simultaneously by decentralizing and globalizing forces. Through ground up investigations of how local groups with different cultural backgrounds and resource bases are responding to the greater autonomy afforded by Indonesia’s new political constellation, the authors appraise the prospects for rearticulating governance regimes toward a more equitable and sustainable ’commonweal’. This volume offers valuable insights into questions of import to scholars as well as policy-makers concerned with decentralized governance and sustainable resource management.

Rules without Rights

INDIGENEITY AND AUTHORITY Adat evolved from the Islamic Sultanates of the thirteenth century, through Dutch colonialism in the seventeenth century, to the development of the Indonesian nation-state in the twentieth century.

Rules without Rights

Activists have exposed startling forms of labor exploitation and environmental degradation in global industries, leading many large retailers and brands to adopt standards for fairness and sustainability. This book is about the idea that transnational corporations can push these standards through their global supply chains, and in effect, pull factories, forests, and farms out of their local contexts and up to global best practices. For many scholars and practitioners, this kind of private regulation and global standard-setting can provide an alternative to regulation by territorially-bound, gridlocked, or incapacitated nation states, potentially improving environments and working conditions around the world and protecting the rights of exploited workers, impoverished farmers, and marginalized communities. But can private, voluntary standards actually create meaningful forms of regulation? Are forests and factories around the world actually being made into sustainable ecosystems and decent workplaces? Can global norms remake local orders? This book provides striking new answers by comparing the private regulation of land and labor in democratic and authoritarian settings. Case studies of sustainable forestry and fair labour standards in Indonesia and China show not only how transnational standards are implemented 'on the ground' but also how they are constrained and reconfigured by domestic governance. Combining rich multi-method analyses, a powerful comparative approach, and a new theory of private regulation, Rules without Rights reveals the contours and contradictions of transnational governance. Transformations in Governance is a major new academic book series from Oxford University Press. It is designed to accommodate the impressive growth of research in comparative politics, international relations, public policy, federalism, environmental and urban studies concerned with the dispersion of authority from central states up to supranational institutions, down to subnational governments, and side-ways to public-private networks. It brings together work that significantly advances our understanding of the organization, causes, and consequences of multilevel and complex governance. The series is selective, containing annually a small number of books of exceptionally high quality by leading and emerging scholars. The series targets mainly single-authored or co-authored work, but it is pluralistic in terms of disciplinary specialization, research design, method, and geographical scope. Case studies as well as comparative studies, historical as well as contemporary studies, and studies with a national, regional, or international focus are all central to its aims. Authors use qualitative, quantitative, formal modeling, or mixed methods. A trade mark of the books is that they combine scholarly rigour with readable prose and an attractive production style. The series is edited by Liesbet Hooghe and Gary Marks of the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, and Walter Mattli of the University of Oxford.

Indigenous Textual Cultures

Berkeley: University of California Press, 2012. Klenke, Karin. “Whose Adat Is It? Adat, Indigeneity and Social Stratification in Toraja.” In Adat and Indigeneity in Indonesia: Culture and Entitlements between Heteronomy and ...

Indigenous Textual Cultures

As modern European empires expanded, written language was critical to articulations of imperial authority and justifications of conquest. For imperial administrators and thinkers, the non-literacy of “native” societies demonstrated their primitiveness and inability to change. Yet as the contributors to Indigenous Textual Cultures make clear through cases from the Pacific Islands, Australasia, North America, and Africa, indigenous communities were highly adaptive and created novel, dynamic literary practices that preserved indigenous knowledge traditions. The contributors illustrate how modern literacy operated alongside orality rather than replacing it. Reconstructing multiple traditions of indigenous literacy and textual production, the contributors focus attention on the often hidden, forgotten, neglected, and marginalized cultural innovators who read, wrote, and used texts in endlessly creative ways. This volume demonstrates how the work of these innovators played pivotal roles in reimagining indigenous epistemologies, challenging colonial domination, and envisioning radical new futures. Contributors. Noelani Arista, Tony Ballantyne, Alban Bensa, Keith Thor Carlson, Evelyn Ellerman, Isabel Hofmeyr, Emma Hunter, Arini Loader, Adrian Muckle, Lachy Paterson, Laura Rademaker, Michael P. J. Reilly, Bruno Saura, Ivy T. Schweitzer, Angela Wanhalla

Indigenous Knowledge and Mental Health

Indigeneity and the socio-cultural differences of the Indigenous community are not yet part of Indonesia's legal and ... Indigenous community in Indonesia, also known as the adat community, has been oppressed by the New Order regime ...

Indigenous Knowledge and Mental Health

This book brings together Indigenous and allied experts addressing mental health among Indigenous peoples across the traditional territories commonly known as the Americas (e.g. Canada, US, Caribbean Islands, Mexico, Bolivia, Venezuela, Ecuador and Brazil), Asia (e.g. China, Korea, Japan, Taiwan and Indonesia), Africa (e.g. South Africa, Central and West Africa) and Oceania (New Guinea and Australia) to exchange knowledge, perspectives and methods for mental health research and service delivery. Around the world, Indigenous peoples have experienced marginalization, rapid culture change and absorption into a global economy with little regard for their needs or autonomy. This cultural discontinuity has been linked to high rates of depression, substance abuse, suicide, and violence in many communities, with the most dramatic impact on youth. Nevertheless, Indigenous knowledge, tradition and practice have remained central to wellbeing, resilience and mental health in these populations. Such is the focus of this book.

Continuity under Change in Dayak Societies

this recognition first of all means recognition of indigenous people's rights to their land and resources ... ordering the state of Indonesia and its institutions to respect adat rights on land insofar as adat communities could prove ...

Continuity under Change in Dayak Societies

This volume provides a balanced picture of change and continuity within Dayak societies from an anthropological perspective by exploring diverse ways in which certain kinds of knowledge, performances and practices continue within the context of rapid and profound change. The contributions cover a broad variety of topics including political reform, decentralisation, environmental change and related changes in natural resource management, religion and ritual practice, the (re-)formation of ethnic identities as well as conflict transformation in Indonesian Borneo.​