Ahab Agonistes

According to the biblical text Ahab fought the Aramaeans. ... That is, Ahab's alliance with the Aramaeans was a matter of necessity before a common enemy, but this did not prevent national concerns from taking ... Text in 82 Ahab Agonistes.

Ahab Agonistes

The European Seminar in Historical Methodology is committed to debating issues surrounding the history of ancient Israel and Judah with the aim of developing methodological principles for writing a history of the period. In this particular session the topic chosen was the Omride dynasty-its rise and fall-and the subsequent Jehu dynasty, down to the fall of Samaria to the Assyrians. Participants discuss such topics as the dating of prophetic texts, the house of Ahab in Chronicles, the Tel Dan inscription, the Mesha inscription, the Jezebel tradition, the archaeology of Iron IIB, the relationship between the biblical text and contemporary sources, and the nature of the Omride state. The volume incidentally gives a reasonably comprehensive treatment of the main sources, issues, debates, and secondary literature on this period of Israel's history. An introductory chapter summarizes the individual papers and also the relevant section of Mario Liverani's recent history of the period. A concluding `Reflections on the Debate' summarizes the issues raised in the papers and provides a perspective on the discussion. LHB/OTS volume 421 - ESHM volume 6

Biblical Narrative and Palestine s History

Ahab Agonistes: The Rise and Fall of the Omri Dynasty, LHB/OTS 421 (London: T&T Clark, 2007), 236–92. 7. Miller, 'The Moabite Stone'; Thompson, 'Testimony,' 241 and n24. Grabbe, Ahab Agonistes, 333, also seems to misunderstand both ...

Biblical Narrative and Palestine s History

Modern biblical scholarship's commitment to the historical-critical method in its efforts to write a history of Israel has created the central and unavoidable problem of writing an objective and critical history of Palestine through the biblical literature with the methods of Biblical Archaeology. 'Biblical Narrative and Palestine's History' brings together key essays on historical method and the archaeology and history of Palestine. The essays employ comparative and formalistic techniques to illuminate the allegorical and mythical in Old Testament narrative traditions from Genesis to Nehemiah. In so doing, the volume presents a detailed review of central and radical changes in both our understanding of biblical traditions and the archaeology and history of Palestine. The study offers an analysis of Biblical narrative as rooted in ancient Near Eastern literature since the Bronze Age.

International Review of Biblical Studies Internationale Zeitschriftenschau Fur Bibelwissenschaft Und Grenzgebiete

Ahab Agonistes; T & T Clark International, London (2007) 100–103 1685 David Ussishkin, Samaria, Jezreel and Megiddo: Royal Centres of Omri and Ahab The Omride compounds at both Samaria and Jezreel resemble each other, showing a common ...

International Review of Biblical Studies   Internationale Zeitschriftenschau Fur Bibelwissenschaft Und Grenzgebiete

Formerly known by its subtitle Internationale Zeitschriftenschau für Bibelwissenschaft und Grenzgebiete, the International Review of Biblical Studies has served the scholarly community ever since its inception in the early 1950’s. Each annual volume includes approximately 2,000 abstracts and summaries of articles and books that deal with the Bible and related literature, including the Dead Sea Scrolls, Pseudepigrapha, Non-canonical gospels, and ancient Near Eastern writings. The abstracts – which may be in English, German, or French - are arranged thematically under headings such as e.g. Genesis, Matthew, Greek language, text and textual criticism, exegetical methods and approaches, biblical theology, social and religious institutions, biblical personalities, history of Israel and early Judaism, and so on. The articles and books that are abstracted and reviewed are collected annually by an international team of collaborators from over 300 of the most important periodicals and book series in the fields covered.

The Jehu Revolution

Nadav Na'aman, “Royal Inscription Verses Prophetic Story: Mesha's Rebellion According to Biblical and Moabite Historiography,” in Ahab Agonistes: The Rise and Fall of the Omri Dynasty (ed.

The Jehu Revolution

Who wrote the material about Jehu in the Bible, when and why did they write it, and how reliable is it? After a thorough text and literary critical examination of 2 Kings 9–10, this work demonstrates the plausibility of an 8th century origin for the Jehu narrative, which did not exist as an isolated literary tradition, but represented a part of a larger story of Israel’s monarchic history. Ultimately, this book offers a new redaction-historical evaluation of Kings and a historical reconstruction of the events behind the Jehu narrative based on biblical and extrabiblical literature.

Congress Volume Helsinki 2010

Was Ahab Killed by an Assyrian Arrow in the Battle of Qarqar? UF 37: 461–74. ——. 2007a. Royal Inscription versus Prophetic Story: Mesha's Rebellion according to Biblical and Moabite Historiography. Pages 145–83 in Ahab Agonistes: The ...

Congress Volume Helsinki 2010

This volume brings together the main contributions to the 20th congress of the International Organization for the Study of the Old Testament (IOSOT) held in Helsinki, Finland in August, 2010, focusing on archaeology, textual history, Deuteronomistic texts, and Wisdom and apocalypticism.

Feminist Frameworks and the Bible

Lester L. Grabbe, “Reflections on the Discussion,” in Ahab Agonistes: The Rise and Fall of the Omri Dynasty, ed. Lester L. Grabbe, LHBOTS 421 (London: T&T Clark, 2007), 331–41 (338). Linda Tuhiwai Smith, Decolonizing Methodologies: ...

Feminist Frameworks and the Bible

This volume on intercultural biblical interpretation includes essays by feminist scholars from Botswana, Germany, New Zealand, Nigeria, South Africa, and the United States. Reading from a rich variety of socio-cultural locations, contributors present their hermeneutical frameworks for interpretation of Hebrew Bible texts, each framework grounded in the writer's journey of professional or social formation and serving as a prism or optic for feminist critical analysis. The volume hosts a lively conversation about the nature and significance of biblical interpretation in a global context, focusing on issues at the nexus of operations of power, textual ambiguity, and intersectionality. Engaged here are notions of biblical authority and postures of dissent; women's agency, discernment, rivalry, and alliance in ancient and contemporary contexts; ideological constructions of sexuality and power; interpretations related to indigeneity, racial identity, interethnic intimacy, and violence in colonial contexts; theologies of the feminine divine and feminist understandings of the sacred; convictions about interdependence and conditions of flourishing for all beings in creation; and ethics of resistance positioned over against dehumanization in political, theological, and hermeneutical praxes. Through their textual and contextual engagements, contributors articulate a broad spectrum of feminist insights into the possibilities for emancipatory visions of community.

The Elisha Hazael Paradigm and the Kingdom of Israel

Ahab Agonistes: The Rise and Fall of the Omri Dynasty, European Seminar on Methodology in Israel's History 6, 100–103. New York: T. & T. Clark. Knauf, E. Axel 2007b. “Review of Megan B. Moore, Philosophy and Practice in Writing a ...

The Elisha Hazael Paradigm and the Kingdom of Israel

First Published in 2014. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.

Social Memory among the Literati of Yehud

of the regnal account of Jehoshaphat's reign (not Ahab's).9 Thus it is not surprising that it contributes to the ... See E. Ben Zvi, “The House of Omri/Ahab in Chronicles”, in Ahab Agonistes: The Rise and Fall of the Omri Dynasty (ed.

Social Memory among the Literati of Yehud

Ehud Ben Zvi has been at the forefront of exploring how the study of social memory contributes to our understanding of the intellectual worldof the literati of the early Second Temple period and their textual repertoire. Many of his studies on the matter and several new relevant works are here collected together providing a very useful resource for furthering research and teaching in this area. The essays included here address, inter alia, prophets as sites of memory, kings as sites memory, Jerusalem as a site of memory, a mnemonic system shaped by two interacting ‘national’ histories, matters of identity and othering as framed and explored via memories, mnemonic metanarratives making sense of the past and serving various didactic purposes and their problems, memories of past and futures events shared by the literati, issues of gender constructions and memory, memories understood by the group as ‘counterfactual’ and their importance, and, in multiple ways, how and why shared memories served as a (safe) playground for exploring multiple, central ideological issues within the group and of generative grammars governing systemic preferences and dis-preferences for particular memories.

David s Successors

we can see the second half of the story even more negatively toward Ahab than the first half. “Yhwh's condemnation not only targets Ahab and ... Searching for Jezebel,” in Ahab Agonistes: The Rise and Fall of the Omri Dynasty, ed.

David s Successors

David’s Successors: Kingship in the Old Testament argues for a new reading of kingship in the Old Testament. Rather than presenting the kings as monsters—with the occasional angelic ruler—this study seeks a more nuanced version of kingship. This book considers the original concept and context of kingship before concentrating on five kings in particular: Jeroboam, Ahab, Hezekiah, Manasseh, and Josiah. Much contemporary scholarship is concerned with the reconceptualization and recontextualization of kingship that hearkens from a negative perspective on kingship, but this book will fully consider the positive and original vision of kingship. This book is ultimately rooted in a hopeful and joyful view of humanity as found in the Psalms, Sirach, and the Chronicles.

The Oxford Handbook of the Prophets

David Ussishkin, “Samaria, Jezreel and Megiddo: Royal Centres of Omri and Ahab,” in Ahab Agonistes: The Rise and Fall of the Omri Dynasty (LHBOTS 421; ed. Lester L. Grabbe; London and New York: T & T Clark, 2007), 293–309; ...

The Oxford Handbook of the Prophets

The Latter Prophets--Isaiah, Jeremiah, Ezekiel, and the Book of the Twelve--comprise a fascinating collection of prophetic oracles, narratives, and vision reports from ancient Israel and Judah. Spanning centuries and showing evidence of compositional growth and editorial elaboration over time, these prophetic books offer an unparalleled view into the cultural norms, theological convictions, and political disputes of Israelite communities caught in the maelstrom of militarized conflicts with the empires of ancient Egypt, Babylonia, and Persia. Instructive for scholar and student alike, The Oxford Handbook of the Prophets features wide-ranging discussion of ancient Near Eastern social and cultic contexts; exploration of focused topics such as the persona of the prophet and the problem of violence in prophetic rhetoric; sophisticated historical and literary analysis of key prophetic texts; issues in reception history, from these texts' earliest reinterpretations at Qumran to Christian appropriations in contemporary homiletics; feminist, materialist, and postcolonial readings engaging the insights of influential contemporary theorists; and more. The diversity of interpretive approaches, clarity of presentation, and breadth of expertise represented here will make this Handbook indispensable for research and teaching on the Latter Prophets.

The Emergence of Israel in Ancient Palestine

Jezreel and Megiddo: Royal Centres of Omri and Ahab«, in Grabbe, ed., Ahab Agonistes, 293-309 (see especially the historical interpretation on pp. 306-307). Cf. also I. Finkelstein, ...

The Emergence of Israel in Ancient Palestine

Taking advantage of critical methodology for history-writing and the use of anthropological insights and ethnographic data from the modern Middle East, this study aims at providing new understandings on the emergence of Israel in ancient Palestine and the socio-political dynamics at work in the Levant during antiquity. The book begins with a discussion of matters of historiography and history-writing, both in ancient and modern times, and an evaluation on the incidence of the modern theological discourse in relation to history and history-writing. Chapter 2 evaluates the methodology used by biblical scholars for gaining knowledge on ancient Israelite society. Pfoh argues that such attempts often apply socio-scientific models on biblical narratives without external evidence of the reconstructed past, producing a virtual past reality which cannot be confirmed concretely. Chapter 3 deals with the archaeological remains usually held as clear evidence of Israelite statehood in the tenth century BCE. The main criticism is directed towards archaeological interpretations of the data which are led by the biblical narratives of the books of Judges and Samuel, resulting in a harmonic blend of ancient literature and modern anthropological models on state-formation. Chapter 4 continues with the discussion on how anthropological models should be employed for history-writing. Socio-political concepts, such as chiefdom society or state formation should not be imposed on the contents of ancient literary sources (i.e., the Bible) but used instead to analyse our primary sources (the archaeological and epigraphic records), in order to create a socio-historical account. The final chapter attempts to provide an historical explanation regarding the emergence of Israel in ancient Palestine without relying on the Bible but only on archaeology, epigraphy and anthropological insights. This Israel is not the biblical one. This is the Israel from history, the one that the modern historian aims at recovering from the study of ancient epigraphic and archaeological remains. The arguments presented challenge the idea that the biblical writers were recording historical events as we understand this practice nowadays and that we can use the biblical records for creating critical histories of Israel in ancient Palestine. It also questions the existence of undisputable traces of statehood in the archaeological record from the Iron Age, as the biblical images about a United Monarchy might lead us to believe. Thus, drawing on ethnographic insights, we may gain a better knowledge on how ancient Levantine societies functioned, providing us with a context for understanding the emergence of historical Israel as a major highland patronate, with a socio-political life of almost two centuries. It is during the later periods of ancient Palestines history, the Persian and the Graeco-Roman, that we find the proper context into which biblical Israel is created, beginning a literary life of more than two millennia.

Violence in the Hebrew Bible

... in Ahab Agonistes: The Rise and Fall of the Omri Dynasty (ed. Lester L. Grabbe; The Library of Hebrew Bible/Old Testament Studies 421; London: Bloomsbury, 2007), 104–34, esp. 123–24. This chapter uses the NRSV translation, ...

Violence in the Hebrew Bible

In Violence in the Hebrew Bible texts of violence in the Hebrew Bible and their reception history are discussed. The central question of the essays is how to allow for a given text’s plurality of possible and realised meanings while also retaining the ability to form critical judgments regarding biblical exegesis.

The Artistic Dimension

When Jehoshaphat's grandson Ahaziah—still in league with the house of Ahab—is thus pictured as hiding in Samaria ... See E. Ben Zvi, “The House of Omri/Ahab in Chronicles,” in Ahab Agonistes: The Rise and Fall of the Omri Dynasty (ed.

The Artistic Dimension

This volume presents a collection of essays aimed at further integration of literary analysis in the study of the Hebrew Bible. In three sections, Bodner studies a range of texts in order to illustrate that literary analysis has value for exploring numerous issues in the discipline, including text-critical problems, the Deuteronomistic History, and Chronicles. Beginning with a discussion of how literary analysis is a vital, yet neglected, component of textual criticism, Bodner then offers a sustained engagement with one particular section of the Hebrew Bible, the so-called "ark narrative" of 1 Samuel 4-6. Other areas of the Hebrew Bible are subsequently explored, including a sample of the historiographic material in the Deuteronomistic History and a lengthy text from the book of Proverbs. Part four turns to the often neglected books of 1 & 2 Chronicles, illustrating how the Chronicler's work is a congenial site for literary study. The assembled essays petition for a heightened awareness of the artistic achievement of the Hebrew Bible and illustrate that literary thinking is a necessary component for biblical interpretation.

The Legacy of Israel in Judah s Bible

Ahab Agonistes: The Rise and Fall ofthe Omri Dynasty. London: T. 8c T. Clark. Graupner, Axel. 2002. Der Elohist: Gegenwart und Wirksamkeit des transcendenten Gottes in der Geschichte. Neukirchen-Vluyn: Neukirchener.

The Legacy of Israel in Judah s Bible

This book offers a new way for biblical scholars and archaeologists to envision how the Bible's story relates to history. It presents a fresh case for the urgency and interest of biblical study in historical context, embracing the complications of a text collection with the messy history of transmission and uncertain knowledge of the past. Focusing on structures of politics and society, the analysis is situated in the broad study of antiquity, so that ancient Israel may contribute to understanding problems in the classical world and other domains outside the Near East.

Contextualizing Israel s Sacred Writing

Mesha's Rebellion according to Biblical and Moabite Historiography,” in Grabbe, Ahab Agonistes, 145–83; Shuichi Hasegawa, Aram and Israel during the Jehuite Dynasty (Berlin: de Gruyter, 2012), 103–5; André Lemaire, “Un siècle et demi de ...

Contextualizing Israel   s Sacred Writing

An essential resource exploring orality and literacy in the pre-Hellenistic southern Levant and the Hebrew Bible Situated historically between the invention of the alphabet, on the one hand, and the creation of ancient Israel's sacred writings, on the other, is the emergence of literary production in the ancient Levant. In this timely collection of essays by an international cadre of scholars, the dialectic between the oral and the written, the intersection of orality with literacy, and the advent of literary composition are each explored as a prelude to the emergence of biblical writing in ancient Israel. Contributors also examine a range of relevant topics including scripturalization, the compositional dimensions of orality and textuality as they engage biblical poetry, prophecy, and narrative along with their antecedents, and the ultimate autonomy of the written in early Israel. The contributors are James M. Bos, David M. Carr, André Lemaire, Robert D. Miller II, Nadav Na'aman, Raymond F. Person Jr., Frank H. Polak, Christopher A. Rollston, Seth L. Sanders, Joachim Schaper, Brian B. Schmidt, William M. Schniedewind, Elsie Stern, and Jessica Whisenant. Features Addresses questions of literacy and scribal activity in the Levant and Negev Articles examine memory, oral tradition, and text criticism Discussion of the processes of scripturalization

Biblical History and Israel S Past

In Ahab Agonistes: The Rise and Fall of the Omride Dynasty, edited by Lester L. Grabbe, pp. 54-99. LHBOTS 421. London: T. & T. Clark, 2007. 3⁄43⁄43⁄4. “The Kingdom of Judah from Sennacherib's Invasion to the Fall of Jerusalem: If We ...

Biblical History and Israel S Past

Although scholars have for centuries primarily been interested in using the study of ancient Israel to explain, illuminate, and clarify the biblical story, Megan Bishop Moore and Brad E. Kelle describe how scholars today seek more and more to tell the story of the past on its own terms, drawing from both biblical and extrabiblical sources to illuminate ancient Israel and its neighbors without privileging the biblical perspective. Biblical History and Israel s Past provides a comprehensive survey of how study of the Old Testament and the history of Israel has changed since the middle of the twentieth century. Moore and Kelle discuss significant trends in scholarship, trace the development of ideas since the 1970s, and summarize major scholars, viewpoints, issues, and developments.

The Great Leap Fraud

Lester L. Grabbe, in Ahab Agonistes: The Rise and Fall of the Omri Dynasty, writes Although not found during a controlled excavation, the origin of the Mesha stele, in Dhiban, is well attested by the detailed history of its discovery, ...

The Great Leap Fraud

Religious ignorance is as dangerous for societal stability as religious extremism. In The Great Leap-Fraud, author A. J. Deus shows that only through the cowardly behavior of a majority that is uneducated in religious questions can sectarian extremism and terrorism take shape and overtake societies. Modern civilizations fail to address the dangerous defect. Based on a reassessment of primary documents from the beginning of Judaism through to the Reformation, The Great Leap-Fraud evaluates the Judaic scriptures of the Jews, the Christians, and the Muslims for their potential to stir hatred, violence, and terrorism. It searches for messages in the scriptures that may alter the economic behavior of societies. While providing an overview of three major religions—Judaism, Christianity, and Islam—The Great Leap-Fraud uncovers a series of frauds and premeditated deployment of “prophets” with the goal to establish or redeem the Jewish state of Israel. It also uncovers how the vested interest of Christian historians has pushed the rise of Christianity unto Roman Emperors. Deus shows that the way humans think and act are strongly influenced by a culture driven by the norms of religious organizations, both past and present. More information at www.ajdeus.org.

The God of Israel in History and Tradition

... Na'aman, “Royal Inscription versus Prophetic Story: Mesha's Rebellion according to Biblical and Moabite Historiography,” in Ahab Agonistes: The Rise and Fall of the Omri Dynasty, ed. Lester L. Grabbe, LHB/OTS 421 (London: T&T Clark, ...

The    God of Israel    in History and Tradition

In The “God of Israel” in History and Tradition, Michael Stahl examines the historical and ideological significances of the formulaic title “god of Israel” (’elohe yisra’el) in the Hebrew Bible using critical theory on social power and identity.

A Community of Peoples

2 See,e.g.,NadavNa'aman,“RoyalInscriptionversusPropheticStory:Mesha'sRebellionaccord- ing to Biblical and Moabite Historiography,” in Ahab Agonistes: The Rise and Fall of the Omri Dynasty, ed. Lester L. Grabbe, lhbots 421 (London: T&T ...

   A Community of Peoples

A “Community of Peoples” draws together a diverse community of scholars to honor the career of Daniel E. Fleming. Through a diversity of methods and disciplines, each contributor attempts to touch a sliver of ancient Middle Eastern history.

Ancient Israel s History

Nadav Na'aman, “Royal Inscription versus Prophetic Story: Mesha's Rebellion according to Biblical and Moabite Historiography,” in Grabbe, Ahab Agonistes, 164–65. 58. Lester L. Grabbe, “Are Historians of Ancient Palestine Fellow ...

Ancient Israel s History

The history of Israel is a much-debated topic in Old Testament studies. On one side are minimalists who find little of historical value in the Hebrew Bible. On the other side are those who assume the biblical text is a precise historical record. Many serious students of the Bible find themselves between these two positions and would benefit from a careful exploration of issues in Israelite history. This substantive history of Israel textbook values the Bible's historical contribution without overlooking critical issues and challenges. Featuring the latest scholarship, the book introduces students to the current state of research on issues relevant to the study of ancient Israel. The editors and contributors, all top biblical scholars and historians, discuss historical evidence in a readable manner, using both canonical and chronological lenses to explore Israelite history. Illustrative items, such as maps and images, visually support the book's content. Tables and sidebars are also included.