AI for Creativity

AI for Creativity provides a fascinating look at what is currently emerging in the very cutting-edge area of artificial intelligence and the tools being developed to enable computational creativity that holds the propensity to dramatically ...

AI for Creativity

What is computational creativity? Can AI learn to be creative? One of the human mind’s most valuable features is the capacity to formulate creative thoughts, an ability that through quantum leap innovations has propelled us to the current digital age. However, creative breakthroughs are easier said than done. Appearing less frequently and more sporadically than desired, it seems that we have not yet fully cracked the creative code. But with the rapid advances in artificial intelligence which have come to provide an ever-closer proximity with the cognitive faculties of mankind, can this emerging technology improve our creative capabilities? What will that look like and will it be the missing link in the man–machine enigma? AI for Creativity provides a fascinating look at what is currently emerging in the very cutting-edge area of artificial intelligence and the tools being developed to enable computational creativity that holds the propensity to dramatically change our lives.

The Creativity Code

Most books on AI focus on the future of work.

The Creativity Code

Most books on AI focus on the future of work. But now that algorithms can learn and adapt, does the future of creativity also belong to well-programmed machines? To answer this question, Marcus du Sautoy takes us to the forefront of creative new technologies and offers a more positive and unexpected vision of our future cohabitation with machines.

Cognition and the Creative Machine

In this book she describes the implementation of related prototype AI systems, and the computational and empirical experiments conducted.

Cognition and the Creative Machine

How would you assemble a machine that can be creative, what would its cogs be? Starting from how humans do creative problem solving, the author has developed a framework to explore whether a diverse set of creative problem-solving tasks can be solved computationally using a unified set of principles. In this book she describes the implementation of related prototype AI systems, and the computational and empirical experiments conducted. The book will be of interest to researchers, graduate students, and laypeople engaged with ideas in artificial intelligence, cognitive science, and creativity.

The Artist in the Machine

Miller argues that computers can already be as creative as humans—and someday will surpass us. But this is not a dystopian account; Miller celebrates the creative possibilities of artificial intelligence in art, music, and literature.

The Artist in the Machine

An authority on creativity introduces us to AI-powered computers that are creating art, literature, and music that may well surpass the creations of humans. Today's computers are composing music that sounds “more Bach than Bach,” turning photographs into paintings in the style of Van Gogh's Starry Night, and even writing screenplays. But are computers truly creative—or are they merely tools to be used by musicians, artists, and writers? In this book, Arthur I. Miller takes us on a tour of creativity in the age of machines. Miller, an authority on creativity, identifies the key factors essential to the creative process, from “the need for introspection” to “the ability to discover the key problem.” He talks to people on the cutting edge of artificial intelligence, encountering computers that mimic the brain and machines that have defeated champions in chess, Jeopardy!, and Go. In the central part of the book, Miller explores the riches of computer-created art, introducing us to artists and computer scientists who have, among much else, unleashed an artificial neural network to create a nightmarish, multi-eyed dog-cat; taught AI to imagine; developed a robot that paints; created algorithms for poetry; and produced the world's first computer-composed musical, Beyond the Fence, staged by Android Lloyd Webber and friends. But, Miller writes, in order to be truly creative, machines will need to step into the world. He probes the nature of consciousness and speaks to researchers trying to develop emotions and consciousness in computers. Miller argues that computers can already be as creative as humans—and someday will surpass us. But this is not a dystopian account; Miller celebrates the creative possibilities of artificial intelligence in art, music, and literature.

Artificial Intelligence and Creativity

This volume brings this work together and provides an overview of this rapidly developing field. It addresses a range of issues. Can computers be creative? Can they help us to understand human creativity?

Artificial Intelligence and Creativity

Creativity is one of the least understood aspects of intelligence and is often seen as `intuitive' and not susceptible to rational enquiry. Recently, however, there has been a resurgence of interest in the area, principally in artificial intelligence and cognitive science, but also in psychology, philosophy, computer science, logic, mathematics, sociology, and architecture and design. This volume brings this work together and provides an overview of this rapidly developing field. It addresses a range of issues. Can computers be creative? Can they help us to understand human creativity? How can artificial intelligence (AI) enhance human creativity? How, in particular, can it contribute to the `sciences of the artificial', such as design? Does the new wave of AI (connectionism, geneticism and artificial life) offer more promise in these areas than classical, symbol-handling AI? What would the implications be for AI and cognitive science if computers could not be creative? These issues are explored in five interrelated parts, each of which is introducted and explained by a leading figure in the field. - Prologue (Margaret Boden) - Part I: Foundational Issues (Terry Dartnall) - Part II: Creativity and Cognition (Graeme S. Halford and Robert Levinson) - Part III: Creativity and Connectionism (Chris Thornton) - Part IV: Creativity and Design (John Gero) - Part V: Human Creativity Enhancement (Ernest Edmonds) - Epilogue (Douglas Hofstadter) For researchers in AI, cognitive science, computer science, philosophy, psychology, mathematics, logic, sociology, and architecture and design; and anyone interested in the rapidly growing field of artificial intelligence and creativity.

The Creativity Code

'Du Sautoy's discussion of computer creativity is fascinating' Observer CAN MACHINES BE CREATIVE?

The Creativity Code

Will a computer ever compose a symphony, write a prize-winning novel, or paint a masterpiece? And if so, would we be able to tell the difference? As humans, we have an extraordinary ability to create works of art that elevate, expand and transform what it means to be alive. Yet in many other areas, new developments in AI are shaking up the status quo, as we find out how many of the tasks humans engage in can be done equally well, if not better, by machines. But can machines be creative? Will they soon be able to learn from the art that moves us, and understand what distinguishes it from the mundane? In The Creativity Code, Marcus du Sautoy examines the nature of creativity, as well as providing an essential guide into how algorithms work, and the mathematical rules underpinning them. He asks how much of our emotional response to art is a product of our brains reacting to pattern and structure, and exactly what it is to be creative in mathematics, art, language and music. Marcus finds out how long it might be before machines come up with something creative, and whether they might jolt us into being more imaginative in turn. The result is a fascinating and very different exploration into both AI and the essence of what it means to be human. tly what it is to be creative in mathematics, art, language and music. Marcus finds out how long it might be before machines come up with something creative, and whether they might jolt us into being more imaginative in turn. The result is a fascinating and very different exploration into both AI and the essence of what it means to be human.

Computational Creativity

This book is intended to be a canonical text for this new discipline, through which researchers and students can absorb the philosophy of the field and learn its methods.

Computational Creativity

Computational creativity is an emerging field of research within AI that focuses on the capacity of machines to both generate and evaluate novel outputs that would, if produced by a human, be considered creative. This book is intended to be a canonical text for this new discipline, through which researchers and students can absorb the philosophy of the field and learn its methods. After a comprehensive introduction to the idea of systematizing creativity the contributions address topics such as autonomous intentionality, conceptual blending, literature mining, computational design, models of novelty, evaluating progress in related research, computer-supported human creativity and human-supported computer creativity, common-sense knowledge, and models of social creativity. Products of this research will have real consequences for the worlds of entertainment, culture, science, education, design, and art, in addition to artificial intelligence, and the book will be of value to practitioners and students in all these domains.

Artificial Intelligence and Creativity

This volume brings this work together and provides an overview of this rapidly developing field. It addresses a range of issues. Can computers be creative? Can they help us to understand human creativity?

Artificial Intelligence and Creativity

Creativity is one of the least understood aspects of intelligence and is often seen as intuitive' and not susceptible to rational enquiry. Recently, however, there has been a resurgence of interest in the area, principally in artificial intelligence and cognitive science, but also in psychology, philosophy, computer science, logic, mathematics, sociology, and architecture and design. This volume brings this work together and provides an overview of this rapidly developing field. It addresses a range of issues. Can computers be creative? Can they help us to understand human creativity? How can artificial intelligence (AI) enhance human creativity? How, in particular, can it contribute to the sciences of the artificial', such as design? Does the new wave of AI (connectionism, geneticism and artificial life) offer more promise in these areas than classical, symbol-handling AI? What would the implications be for AI and cognitive science if computers could not be creative? These issues are explored in five interrelated parts, each of which is introducted and explained by a leading figure in the field. - Prologue (Margaret Boden) - Part I: Foundational Issues (Terry Dartnall) - Part II: Creativity and Cognition (Graeme S. Halford and Robert Levinson) - Part III: Creativity and Connectionism (Chris Thornton) - Part IV: Creativity and Design (John Gero) - Part V: Human Creativity Enhancement (Ernest Edmonds) - Epilogue (Douglas Hofstadter) For researchers in AI, cognitive science, computer science, philosophy, psychology, mathematics, logic, sociology, and architecture and design; and anyone interested in the rapidly growing field of artificial intelligence and creativity.

Artificial Intelligence and Literary Creativity

In this book, the authors push AI toward a time when machines can autonomously write not just humdrum stories of the sort seen for years in AI, but first-rate fiction thought to be the province of human genius.

Artificial Intelligence and Literary Creativity

Is human creativity a wall that AI can never scale? Many people are happy to admit that experts in many domains can be matched by either knowledge-based or sub-symbolic systems, but even some AI researchers harbor the hope that when it comes to feats of sheer brilliance, mind over machine is an unalterable fact. In this book, the authors push AI toward a time when machines can autonomously write not just humdrum stories of the sort seen for years in AI, but first-rate fiction thought to be the province of human genius. It reports on five years of effort devoted to building a story generator--the BRUTUS.1 system. This book was written for three general reasons. The first theoretical reason for investing time, money, and talent in the quest for a truly creative machine is to work toward an answer to the question of whether we ourselves are machines. The second theoretical reason is to silence those who believe that logic is forever closed off from the emotional world of creativity. The practical rationale for this endeavor, and the third reason, is that machines able to work alongside humans in arenas calling for creativity will have incalculable worth.

Creativity

This comprehensive handbook for teachers presents an overview of creativity from the psychological and educational perspectives.

Creativity

This comprehensive handbook for teachers presents an overview of creativity from the psychological and educational perspectives. It includes the biological and neural bases of creativity and covers the practical methods of fostering creativity. With contributions from eminent scholars in the field, the book consists of four parts, namely development, theories, education, and practice and pedagogy. The book serves as a reference source on the historical development, concepts, theories and practical applications of creativity.

CREATIVITY CODE

CREATIVITY CODE


Exploring Appreciative Inquiry and Its Links to Creativity

The purpose of this project was to gain a deeper insight into Appreciative Inquiry and to understand possible connections between this philosophy of change and creativity in general and the creative process in particular.

Exploring Appreciative Inquiry and Its Links to Creativity

Explores appreciative inquiry (AI), a philosophy of change, and its connections to creativity in general and the creative process in particular. AI is defined as "a creative change tool that fosters a creative environment through the affirmative perspective and the focus on existing assets in the organization."--Page 6.

Human AI Synergy in Creativity and Innovation

Known algorithms that query humans in particular ways can effectively counter these text-based blind spots. Working together, a human-computer partnership can achieve higher degrees of innovation than either working alone.

Human AI Synergy in Creativity and Innovation

In order to maximize creative behavior, humans and computers need to collaborate in a manner that will leverage the strengths of both. A 2017 mathematical proof shows two limits to how innovative a computer can be. Humans can help counteract these demonstrated limits. Humans possess many mental blind spots to innovating (e.g., functional fixedness, design fixation, analogy blindness, et cetera), and particular algorithms can help counteract these shortcomings. Further, since humans produce the corpora used by AI technology, human blind spots to innovation are implicit within the text processed by AI technology. Known algorithms that query humans in particular ways can effectively counter these text-based blind spots. Working together, a human-computer partnership can achieve higher degrees of innovation than either working alone. To become an effective partnership, however, a special interface is needed that is both human- and computer-friendly. This interface called BrainSwarming possesses a linguistic component, which is a formal grammar that is also natural for humans to use and a visual component that is easily represented by standard data structures. Further, the interface breaks down innovative problem solving into its essential components: a goal, sub-goals, resources, features, interactions, and effects. The resulting human-AI synergy has the potential to achieve innovative breakthroughs that either partner working alone may never achieve.

Creative Empathy

If we want our species to survive, if we are to find meaning in life, if we want to save the world and every sentient being that inhabits it, love is the one and only answer" says Albert Einstein. "(I) know that love is ultimately the only ...

Creative Empathy

If we want our species to survive, if we are to find meaning in life, if we want to save the world and every sentient being that inhabits it, love is the one and only answer" says Albert Einstein. "(I) know that love is ultimately the only answer to mankind's problems" said Martin Luther king Jnr. "Love is all" said John Lennon and thousands of other singers, painters, poets and other artists throughout the ages. So social leaders, scientists and the arts all seem to agree, agree that "Love" is the way to go. So what is known about love? Nothing. Not yet.....

The Digital Synaptic Neural Substrate

This book describes a new computational approach to creativity.

The Digital Synaptic Neural Substrate

This book describes a new computational approach to creativity. With chess as the domain of investigation, the authors show experimentally how a computer can be imbued with the 'spark' of creativity that enables it to compose chess problems or puzzles that are both challenging and aesthetically appealing to humans. This new approach called the Digital Synaptic Neural Substrate (DSNS) mimics the brain's ability to combine fragments of seemingly unrelated information from different domains (such as chess, photographs and music) to inspire itself to create new objects in any of them. Representing the cutting edge in computational creativity research, this book will be useful to students, educators and researchers in the field as well as artificial intelligence (AI) practitioners, in general.

Artificial Intelligence How Influences Education Innovation

These are the kinds of things that are going to matter very much in the future and matter already, much faster than we've adapted to them.There's certainly a significant underrepresentation problem in all areas of STEM [science, technology, ...

Artificial Intelligence How Influences Education Innovation

⦁How and why AI impacts to education The field of education is searching for ways to respond to the fast-approaching impact of artificial intelligence (AI) across all sectors and fields, including its own. In this conversation with Jennifer Rexford, computer-science chair at Princeton University, she explains how this requires not only focusing on teaching different skills to prepare today's youth for work in an AI world but also employing AI to adopt novel ways of teaching. She also reiterates a common call for including diversity of thought in developing AI to utilize it successfully. As for creativity, machines may behave in ways that seem creative, such as when they make a smart move in the game of Go or chess, but they're really born of exhaustive enumeration and evaluation of the underlying data. It's not born of that spark of creativity. And that's a clarion call for thinking about not only retraining but even basic education. The way we teach today, even at the K-6 or K-12 level, doesn't put enough emphasis on creativity and social perceptiveness and design and working in teams. These are the kinds of things that are going to matter very much in the future and matter already, much faster than we've adapted to them.There's certainly a significant underrepresentation problem in all areas of STEM [science, technology, engineering, and math], and this is higher in computer science than in some other areas and higher in artificial intelligence than in general computer science. So diversity is definitely a significant problem. And there's a tremendous shortage of skilled people to do this work. There's this general cry of "We need more people, so we really can't afford to leave talent on the table. But there's a second piece to this: the technology being created is so important in so many lines of work and in so many businesses that leaving a large part of the population out of the conversation leaves these people ineffective in a whole bunch of areas in our society-not just computer science, but everywhere.

Creativity

Creativity


Exploring Appreciative Inquiry and Its Link to Creativity

The purpose of this project was to gain a deeper insight into Appreciative Inquiry and to understand possible connections between this philosophy of change and creativity in general and the creative process in particular.

Exploring Appreciative Inquiry and Its Link to Creativity

The purpose of this project was to gain a deeper insight into Appreciative Inquiry and to understand possible connections between this philosophy of change and creativity in general and the creative process in particular. The intention of combining a literature research with a practical application was fourfold: Firstly, this approach would provide insight into the philosophy of Appreciative Inquiry (AI) and its methods and tools. Secondly, equipped with the background knowledge on creativity available to me from the creative studies program and beyond, I expected to discover some parallels and links from AI to creativity during my literature research. Thirdly, the actual application of the AI process as a novice in this field, relying on experience from the creativity area, would allow me to adapt the AI process according to my own judgment. Fourthly it would amplify my knowledge immensely to experience the whole AI process for myself. I found various commonalities between the Appreciative Inquiry and the Creative Problem solving process, ranging from their relation to change, their person focused position and their productive, constructive tenor, to more specific similarities as e.g. both covering comparable steps in their processes, like gathering data and designing certain steps to attain a goal. In sum for me these two processes go hand in hand very well, their strengths combine to a wholesome approach that is more productive and energetic than each of them alone. I found that I want to explore this combination in much more depth, as I saw great potential in taking a more optimistic view on creativity and using creative tools to bolster AI, one of the most effective know change methods today.

Philosophy of Artificial Intelligence

This book deals with the major philosophical issues in the theoretical framework of Artificial Intelligence (AI) in particular and cognitive science in general.

Philosophy of Artificial Intelligence

This book deals with the major philosophical issues in the theoretical framework of Artificial Intelligence (AI) in particular and cognitive science in general. The researchers in AI are concerned with the issues of consciousness, human subjectivity, creativity, etc. Cognitive Science and AI argue that consciousness can be artificially created and comprehended in the function of robots. The robotic activities explain the mechanism involved in computation, language processing, sensing the information, etc. Contrary to this thesis, the philosophical study tries to show that human consciousness, thinking, imagination, etc. are much larger concepts and need to be delved into in the broad theoretical framework. This book is a critique of the mechanistic theory of mind. It shows the basic foundation of AI and its limitations in explaining the activities of the human mental life. Machine-functionalism fails to account for the subjective nature of consciousness and the creativity involved in the conscious acts. There are two aspects of this thesis-- the epistemological and the metaphysical. Epistemologically, the subject of consciousness intimately knows the raw feelings or the qualia. Metaphysically speaking, however, the raw feelings are real in the sense that they are part of the furniture of the mental world. Therefore, we can hardly deny that the mental world is real.