AI for Creativity

AI for Creativity provides a fascinating look at what is currently emerging in the very cutting-edge area of artificial intelligence and the tools being developed to enable computational creativity that holds the propensity to dramatically ...

AI for Creativity

What is computational creativity? Can AI learn to be creative? One of the human mind’s most valuable features is the capacity to formulate creative thoughts, an ability that through quantum leap innovations has propelled us to the current digital age. However, creative breakthroughs are easier said than done. Appearing less frequently and more sporadically than desired, it seems that we have not yet fully cracked the creative code. But with the rapid advances in artificial intelligence which have come to provide an ever-closer proximity with the cognitive faculties of mankind, can this emerging technology improve our creative capabilities? What will that look like and will it be the missing link in the man–machine enigma? AI for Creativity provides a fascinating look at what is currently emerging in the very cutting-edge area of artificial intelligence and the tools being developed to enable computational creativity that holds the propensity to dramatically change our lives.

Artificial Intelligence and Creativity

This volume brings this work together and provides an overview of this rapidly developing field. It addresses a range of issues. Can computers be creative? Can they help us to understand human creativity?

Artificial Intelligence and Creativity

Creativity is one of the least understood aspects of intelligence and is often seen as `intuitive' and not susceptible to rational enquiry. Recently, however, there has been a resurgence of interest in the area, principally in artificial intelligence and cognitive science, but also in psychology, philosophy, computer science, logic, mathematics, sociology, and architecture and design. This volume brings this work together and provides an overview of this rapidly developing field. It addresses a range of issues. Can computers be creative? Can they help us to understand human creativity? How can artificial intelligence (AI) enhance human creativity? How, in particular, can it contribute to the `sciences of the artificial', such as design? Does the new wave of AI (connectionism, geneticism and artificial life) offer more promise in these areas than classical, symbol-handling AI? What would the implications be for AI and cognitive science if computers could not be creative? These issues are explored in five interrelated parts, each of which is introducted and explained by a leading figure in the field. - Prologue (Margaret Boden) - Part I: Foundational Issues (Terry Dartnall) - Part II: Creativity and Cognition (Graeme S. Halford and Robert Levinson) - Part III: Creativity and Connectionism (Chris Thornton) - Part IV: Creativity and Design (John Gero) - Part V: Human Creativity Enhancement (Ernest Edmonds) - Epilogue (Douglas Hofstadter) For researchers in AI, cognitive science, computer science, philosophy, psychology, mathematics, logic, sociology, and architecture and design; and anyone interested in the rapidly growing field of artificial intelligence and creativity.

The Creativity Code

Most books on AI focus on the future of work.

The Creativity Code

Most books on AI focus on the future of work. But now that algorithms can learn and adapt, does the future of creativity also belong to well-programmed machines? To answer this question, Marcus du Sautoy takes us to the forefront of creative new technologies and offers a more positive and unexpected vision of our future cohabitation with machines.

The Artist in the Machine

Miller argues that computers can already be as creative as humans—and someday will surpass us. But this is not a dystopian account; Miller celebrates the creative possibilities of artificial intelligence in art, music, and literature.

The Artist in the Machine

An authority on creativity introduces us to AI-powered computers that are creating art, literature, and music that may well surpass the creations of humans. Today's computers are composing music that sounds “more Bach than Bach,” turning photographs into paintings in the style of Van Gogh's Starry Night, and even writing screenplays. But are computers truly creative—or are they merely tools to be used by musicians, artists, and writers? In this book, Arthur I. Miller takes us on a tour of creativity in the age of machines. Miller, an authority on creativity, identifies the key factors essential to the creative process, from “the need for introspection” to “the ability to discover the key problem.” He talks to people on the cutting edge of artificial intelligence, encountering computers that mimic the brain and machines that have defeated champions in chess, Jeopardy!, and Go. In the central part of the book, Miller explores the riches of computer-created art, introducing us to artists and computer scientists who have, among much else, unleashed an artificial neural network to create a nightmarish, multi-eyed dog-cat; taught AI to imagine; developed a robot that paints; created algorithms for poetry; and produced the world's first computer-composed musical, Beyond the Fence, staged by Android Lloyd Webber and friends. But, Miller writes, in order to be truly creative, machines will need to step into the world. He probes the nature of consciousness and speaks to researchers trying to develop emotions and consciousness in computers. Miller argues that computers can already be as creative as humans—and someday will surpass us. But this is not a dystopian account; Miller celebrates the creative possibilities of artificial intelligence in art, music, and literature.

Artificial Intelligence and Creativity

This volume brings this work together and provides an overview of this rapidly developing field. It addresses a range of issues. Can computers be creative? Can they help us to understand human creativity?

Artificial Intelligence and Creativity

Creativity is one of the least understood aspects of intelligence and is often seen as intuitive' and not susceptible to rational enquiry. Recently, however, there has been a resurgence of interest in the area, principally in artificial intelligence and cognitive science, but also in psychology, philosophy, computer science, logic, mathematics, sociology, and architecture and design. This volume brings this work together and provides an overview of this rapidly developing field. It addresses a range of issues. Can computers be creative? Can they help us to understand human creativity? How can artificial intelligence (AI) enhance human creativity? How, in particular, can it contribute to the sciences of the artificial', such as design? Does the new wave of AI (connectionism, geneticism and artificial life) offer more promise in these areas than classical, symbol-handling AI? What would the implications be for AI and cognitive science if computers could not be creative? These issues are explored in five interrelated parts, each of which is introducted and explained by a leading figure in the field. - Prologue (Margaret Boden) - Part I: Foundational Issues (Terry Dartnall) - Part II: Creativity and Cognition (Graeme S. Halford and Robert Levinson) - Part III: Creativity and Connectionism (Chris Thornton) - Part IV: Creativity and Design (John Gero) - Part V: Human Creativity Enhancement (Ernest Edmonds) - Epilogue (Douglas Hofstadter) For researchers in AI, cognitive science, computer science, philosophy, psychology, mathematics, logic, sociology, and architecture and design; and anyone interested in the rapidly growing field of artificial intelligence and creativity.

Computational Creativity

This book is intended to be a canonical text for this new discipline, through which researchers and students can absorb the philosophy of the field and learn its methods.

Computational Creativity

Computational creativity is an emerging field of research within AI that focuses on the capacity of machines to both generate and evaluate novel outputs that would, if produced by a human, be considered creative. This book is intended to be a canonical text for this new discipline, through which researchers and students can absorb the philosophy of the field and learn its methods. After a comprehensive introduction to the idea of systematizing creativity the contributions address topics such as autonomous intentionality, conceptual blending, literature mining, computational design, models of novelty, evaluating progress in related research, computer-supported human creativity and human-supported computer creativity, common-sense knowledge, and models of social creativity. Products of this research will have real consequences for the worlds of entertainment, culture, science, education, design, and art, in addition to artificial intelligence, and the book will be of value to practitioners and students in all these domains.

Encyclopedia of Creativity

Moreover, AI is very much a developing discipline and its ability to make significant contributions to the domain of creativity or creative problem solving is very much tempered by the developmental progress that has been made in AI ...

Encyclopedia of Creativity


Cognition and the Creative Machine

In this book she describes the implementation of related prototype AI systems, and the computational and empirical experiments conducted.

Cognition and the Creative Machine

How would you assemble a machine that can be creative, what would its cogs be? Starting from how humans do creative problem solving, the author has developed a framework to explore whether a diverse set of creative problem-solving tasks can be solved computationally using a unified set of principles. In this book she describes the implementation of related prototype AI systems, and the computational and empirical experiments conducted. The book will be of interest to researchers, graduate students, and laypeople engaged with ideas in artificial intelligence, cognitive science, and creativity.

The Creativity Code How AI is learning to write paint and think

Will a computer ever compose a symphony, write a prize-winning novel, or paint a masterpiece? And if so, would we be able to tell the difference?

The Creativity Code  How AI is learning to write  paint and think

Will a computer ever compose a symphony, write a prize-winning novel, or paint a masterpiece? And if so, would we be able to tell the difference?

The Comprehensive Guide to Science and Faith

To achieve superintelligence based on AI writing better and better AI software, creativity is required. If computer programs cannot be creative as defined by the Lovelace test, they cannot write better programs beyond the explanations ...

The Comprehensive Guide to Science and Faith

Science and Faith Can—and Do—Support Each Other Science and Christianity are often presented as opposites, when in fact the order of the universe and the complexity of life powerfully testify to intelligent design. With this comprehensive resource that includes the latest research, you’ll witness how the findings of scientists provide compelling reasons to acknowledge the mind and presence of a creator. Featuring more than 45 entries by top-caliber experts, you’ll better understand… how scientific concepts like intelligent design are supported by evidence the scientific findings that support the history and accounts found in the Bible the biases that lead to scientific information being presented as a challenge—rather than a complement—to Christianity Whether you’re looking for answers to your own questions or seeking to explain the case for intelligent design to others, The Comprehensive Guide to Science and Faith is an invaluable apologetic tool that will help you explore and analyze the relevant facts, research, and theories in light of biblical truth.

From Fingers to Digits

Next, chapter 3, “Explaining the Ineffable,” outlines the history of AI research on creativity. ... raise philosophical doubts about whether AI systems are really intelligent, so they often doubt whether they can really be creative.

From Fingers to Digits

Essays on computer art and its relation to more traditional art, by a pioneering practitioner and a philosopher of artificial intelligence. In From Fingers to Digits, a practicing artist and a philosopher examine computer art and how it has been both accepted and rejected by the mainstream art world. In a series of essays, Margaret Boden, a philosopher and expert in artificial intelligence, and Ernest Edmonds, a pioneering and internationally recognized computer artist, grapple with key questions about the aesthetics of computer art. Other modern technologies—photography and film—have been accepted by critics as ways of doing art. Does the use of computers compromise computer art's aesthetic credentials in ways that the use of cameras does not? Is writing a computer program equivalent to painting with a brush? Essays by Boden identify types of computer art, describe the study of creativity in AI, and explore links between computer art and traditional views in philosophical aesthetics. Essays by Edmonds offer a practitioner's perspective, considering, among other things, how the experience of creating computer art compares to that of traditional art making. Finally, the book presents interviews in which contemporary computer artists offer a wide range of comments on the issues raised in Boden's and Edmonds's essays.

CREATIVITY MATTERS

In this truly unexpected twist, my personality changed, and with this came a change in how I view art and the creative process. The possibilities of AI are shocking. Thousands of combinations carried me away at a dizzying speed.

CREATIVITY MATTERS

Most books on creativity put one individual at the center of their narrative as the sole genius. But in a world where we need everybody's creative input for finding fresh answers, glorifying single individuals as "creative geniuses" sends out the wrong message. In sixteen personal stories shared by members of the Sonophilia community, Creativity Matters aims to encourage everyday people to unlock their creativity to tackle business, community and personal issues. Our essays manifest that no one is too small to make an impact and that the definition of creativity is as diverse as the people putting it into work. We have made an effort to write this book because we believe that creativity should not be seen as a privilege but as the essence of what makes us human. Now the time has come to demystify and to democratize creativity!

Explaining Creativity

AI limits its study of the human mind to cognition—rational, analytic, linear, propositional thought. These programs are especially helpful in understanding the cognitive components of creativity: analogy, metaphor, concepts and ...

Explaining Creativity

Explaining Creativity is a comprehensive and authoritative overview of scientific studies on creativity and innovation. Sawyer discusses not only arts like painting and writing, but also science, stage performance, business innovation, and creativity in everyday life. Sawyer's approach is interdisciplinary. In addition to examining psychological studies on creativity, he draws on anthropologists' research on creativity in non-Western cultures, sociologists' research on the situations, contexts, and networks of creative activity, and cognitive neuroscientists' studies of the brain.

Human Computer Interaction Interaction in Context

being creative, the markets of products created by artificial intelligence may function independently from such views based on how it is marketed. ... One unexpected finding from the discussion was about the origins of AI creativity.

Human Computer Interaction  Interaction in Context

The 3 volume-set LNCS 10901, 10902 + 10903 constitutes the refereed proceedings of the 20th International Conference on Human-Computer Interaction, HCI 2018, which took place in Las Vegas, Nevada, in July 2018. The total of 1171 papers and 160 posters included in the 30 HCII 2018 proceedings volumes was carefully reviewed and selected from 4346 submissions. HCI 2018 includes a total of 145 papers; they were organized in topical sections named: Part I: HCI theories, methods and tools; perception and psychological issues in HCI; emotion and attention recognition; security, privacy and ethics in HCI. Part II: HCI in medicine; HCI for health and wellbeing; HCI in cultural heritage; HCI in complex environments; mobile and wearable HCI. Part III: input techniques and devices; speech-based interfaces and chatbots; gesture, motion and eye-tracking based interaction; games and gamification.

Creativity in the Classroom

Evaluating creativity: Making and learning by youngpeople. New York: Routledge. Selby, E. C., Treffmger, D. I., Isaksen, S. G., ... Korean science teachers' understanding of creativity in gifted education. ... Starko, A. I. (1993, May).

Creativity in the Classroom

The fourth edition of this well-known text continues the mission of its predecessors – to help teachers link creativity research and theory to the everyday activities of classroom teaching. Part I includes information on models and theories of creativity, characteristics of creative people, and talent development. Part II includes strategies explicitly designed to teach creative thinking, to weave creative thinking into content area instruction, and to organize basic classroom activities (grouping, lesson planning, assessment, motivation and classroom organization) in ways that support students’ creativity.

HCI International 2020 Late Breaking Papers Multimodality and Intelligence

This paper presents an AI-based co-creative system in which the interaction model focuses on emotional feedback, that is, the decisions about the creative contribution from the AI agent is based on the emotion detected in the human ...

HCI International 2020   Late Breaking Papers  Multimodality and Intelligence

This book constitutes late breaking papers from the 22nd International Conference on Human-Computer Interaction, HCII 2020, which was held in July 2020. The conference was planned to take place in Copenhagen, Denmark, but had to change to a virtual conference mode due to the COVID-19 pandemic. From a total of 6326 submissions, a total of 1439 papers and 238 posters have been accepted for publication in the HCII 2020 proceedings before the conference took place. In addition, a total of 333 papers and 144 posters are included in the volumes of the proceedings published after the conference as “Late Breaking Work” (papers and posters). These contributions address the latest research and development efforts in the field and highlight the human aspects of design and use of computing systems.

Artificial Intelligence and Literary Creativity

In her stimulating book on computers and creativity, The Creative Mind: Myths and Mechanisms, Margaret Boden — who has of late devoted much thought to the AI~creativity connection ~— pronounces Lovelace's argument “too quick and too ...

Artificial Intelligence and Literary Creativity

Is human creativity a wall that AI can never scale? Many people are happy to admit that experts in many domains can be matched by either knowledge-based or sub-symbolic systems, but even some AI researchers harbor the hope that when it comes to feats of sheer brilliance, mind over machine is an unalterable fact. In this book, the authors push AI toward a time when machines can autonomously write not just humdrum stories of the sort seen for years in AI, but first-rate fiction thought to be the province of human genius. It reports on five years of effort devoted to building a story generator--the BRUTUS.1 system. This book was written for three general reasons. The first theoretical reason for investing time, money, and talent in the quest for a truly creative machine is to work toward an answer to the question of whether we ourselves are machines. The second theoretical reason is to silence those who believe that logic is forever closed off from the emotional world of creativity. The practical rationale for this endeavor, and the third reason, is that machines able to work alongside humans in arenas calling for creativity will have incalculable worth.

Explanation Patterns

But, what this really means is that there seems no obvious algorithm to describe creative processes. ... Even though very few people in AI work on creativity per se, AI is based upon the premise that there is nothing mystical in the ...

Explanation Patterns

First Published in 1986. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.

New Directions in Third Wave Human Computer Interaction Volume 1 Technologies

Another term in use is creative AI, which is less strictly concerned with the creative agency of computational systems, and includes any application of AI in creative domains. Interaction design for metacreative systems requires us to ...

New Directions in Third Wave Human Computer Interaction  Volume 1   Technologies

As the first extensive exploration of contemporary third wave HCI, this handbook covers key developments at the leading edge of human-computer interactions. Now in its second decade as a major current of HCI research, the third wave integrates insights from the humanities and social sciences to emphasize human dimensions beyond workplace efficiency or cognitive capacities. The earliest HCI work was strongly based on the concept of human-machine coupling, which expanded to workplace collaboration as computers came into mainstream professional use. Today HCI can connect to almost any human experience because there are new applications for every aspect of daily life. Volume 1 - Technologies covers technical application areas related to artificial intelligence, metacreation, machine learning, perceptual computing, 3D printing, critical making, physical computing, the internet of things, accessibility, sonification, natural language processing, multimodal display, and virtual reality.