Alexis Rockman

Selected Publications Manifest Destiny , Brooklyn Museum of Art , New York , 2004 ( with an essay by Maurice Berger and a foreword by Robert F. Kennedy Jr. ) Alexis Rockman : Second Nature , University Galleries , Illinois State ...

Alexis Rockman


New York Magazine

S LUCK WOULD HAVE IT, Alexis Rockman had his epiphany early, in 1985, right after he finished at the School of Visual Arts. Only 23 and about to participate in a prestigious East Village group show, Rockman got halfway through a ...

New York Magazine

New York magazine was born in 1968 after a run as an insert of the New York Herald Tribune and quickly made a place for itself as the trusted resource for readers across the country. With award-winning writing and photography covering everything from politics and food to theater and fashion, the magazine's consistent mission has been to reflect back to its audience the energy and excitement of the city itself, while celebrating New York as both a place and an idea.

Emerging Infectious Diseases

Alexis Rockman . Genetics and culture [ cited 2009 Apr 7 ] . Available manipulated dog inside a prize - winning blue rosette com- from http://www.viewingspace.com/genetics_culture/pages_genetpete for attention with the cocks placed ...

Emerging Infectious Diseases


Green Light

In the early 1980s Alexis Rockman developed a form of realism that drew on diverse visual sources, including abstract expressionism, Dutch flower painting, nineteenth-century landscape painting, science fiction movies, ...

Green Light

How humans' aesthetic perceptions have shaped other life forms, from racehorses to ornamental plants. Humans have bred plants and animals with an eye to aesthetics for centuries: flowers are selected for colorful blossoms or luxuriant foliage; racehorses are prized for the elegance of their frames. Hybridized plants were first exhibited as fine art in 1936, when the Museum of Modern Art in New York showed Edward Steichen's hybrid delphiniums. Since then, bio art has become a genre; artists work with a variety of living things, including plants, animals, bacteria, slime molds, and fungi. Many commentators have addressed the social and political concerns raised by making art out of living material. In Green Light, however, George Gessert examines the role that aesthetic perception has played in bio art and other interventions in evolution. Gessert looks at a variety of life forms that humans have helped shape, focusing on plants—the most widely domesticated form of life and the one that has been crucial to his own work as an artist. We learn about pleasure gardens of the Aztecs, cultivated for intoxicating fragrance; the aesthetic standards promoted by national plant societies; a daffodil that looks like a rose; and praise for weeds and wildflowers.

Ecosee

Consider the herring gull in Alexis Rockman's painting " Concrete Jungle V " ( 2003 , 193 ) , for instance . Even though David Allen Sibley's painting of this species includes similar distinguishing marks , the field guide image is ...

Ecosee

Examines the rhetorical role of images in communicating environmental ideas.

The Evolution of Paleontological Art

Friis-Hansen, D., 2018a, Alexis Rockman: The Great Lakes Cycle: Grand Rapids, Michigan, Grand Rapids Art Museum, 128 p. Friis-Hansen, D., 2018b, Reflections and refractions: Alexis Rockman and the Great Lakes, in Friis-Hansen, D., ...

The Evolution of Paleontological Art

"This volume samples the history of art about fossils-and the visual conceptualization of their significance-starting with biblical and mythological depictions, extending to renditions of ancient life in long-vanished habitats, and on to a modern understanding that paleoart conveys lessons for the betterment of the human condition. Twenty-nine chapters illustrate how art about fossils has come to be a significant teaching tool not only about evolution of past life, but also about conservation of our planet for the benefit of future generations"--

Shark

In his work, Rockman uses the language of natural history to examine our relationship to it as a culture. ... From November 2010 to May 2011, Alexis Rockman: A Fable for Tomorrow was featured at the Smithsonian American Art Museum.

Shark

“The sharks, ancient or modern, real or imaginary, have always been with us, and will probably remain with us forever. They appear not only in movies and literature, but in countless permutations of size, shape, and materials, permeating our daily lives with their silent menace. In a sense, humans live in a world replete with sharks, not vice-versa.” Thus Richard Ellis sets about chronicling and debunking the myths of sharks throughout history. From 18th century art to the phenomena of JAWS, “the shark” has remained the indomitable aggressor of the deep, the last demon of humankind. The image of the shark and the fear it inspires infiltrates our daily lives with its mythical power and strength. But it is not man who should fear the shark. Our need to dominate these predators is destroying them and their habitat. Through hundreds of full-color images Ellis proves the necessity of preserving these majestic creatures. As curator of the Ft. Lauderdale Museum of Art’s exhibition entitled “Shark”, debuting May 2012, Ellis adeptly turns these sleek, efficient hunters from monsters of the deep into rare, beautiful forces of nature.

Art of the Brooklyn Bridge

Eco-artist Alexis Rockman went much further than Mitchell. Commissioned by the Brooklyn Museum of Art to paint a mural to mark the opening of the museum's new entrance, Rockman delivered Manifest Destiny (2002–2004), a massive landscape ...

Art of the Brooklyn Bridge

The Brooklyn Bridge is a pre-eminent global icon. It is the world’s most famous and beloved bridge, a "must-see" tourist hotspot, and a vital fact of New York life. For almost a hundred and forty years it has inspired artists of all descriptions, fueling a constant stream of paintings, photographs, lithographs, etchings, advertising copy, movies, and book, magazine, and LP covers. In consequence, the bridge may have the richest visual history of any man-made object, so much so, in fact, that almost no major American artist has failed to pay homage to the span in some form or other. Oddly, however, there are no books currently available that chart and discuss the bridge’s visual history or its role in the development of American (or Western) art. This monograph aims to correct that, providing a full visual record of the bridge from the origins of its conception to the present day. It is a celebration of the bridge’s glorious visual heritage timed to appear when the city will celebrate the span’s 125th birthday.

Breaking Down the Barriers

More typical of its ominous , anxious preoccupations is the American painter Alexis Rockman . Using oil paint as illusionistically as Max Ernst , whose apocalyptic visions of the early 1940s must be a major influence , Rockman shares ...

Breaking Down the Barriers

Item consists of collected criticism and essays on art in Britain written in the 1990's for 'The Times'.

Information Arts

I have been attracted to the work of Alexis Rockman because he succeeds so well in mingling the boundaries that scientists view as inviolable in the “ real world ” ( but really represent limits of our own thinking ) , and in fracturing ...

Information Arts

An introduction to the work and ideas of artists who use—and even influence—science and technology. A new breed of contemporary artist engages science and technology—not just to adopt the vocabulary and gizmos, but to explore and comment on the content, agendas, and possibilities. Indeed, proposes Stephen Wilson, the role of the artist is not only to interpret and to spread scientific knowledge, but to be an active partner in determining the direction of research. Years ago, C. P. Snow wrote about the "two cultures" of science and the humanities; these developments may finally help to change the outlook of those who view science and technology as separate from the general culture. In this rich compendium, Wilson offers the first comprehensive survey of international artists who incorporate concepts and research from mathematics, the physical sciences, biology, kinetics, telecommunications, and experimental digital systems such as artificial intelligence and ubiquitous computing. In addition to visual documentation and statements by the artists, Wilson examines relevant art-theoretical writings and explores emerging scientific and technological research likely to be culturally significant in the future. He also provides lists of resources including organizations, publications, conferences, museums, research centers, and Web sites.

Beyond the Bifurcation of Nature

Are these animals supposed to be us, or are they just themselves, eternalized as abstractions drawn out of 3 4 Alexis Rockman, Wonderful World, 2013. Online at Alexis Rockman, http://www.alexisrockman.net (accessed October 9, 2012).

Beyond the Bifurcation of Nature

Environmental destruction, animal abuse, and widespread indifference toward plants and elemental systems demand that a human-centric view of the world be permanently dismantled. But once it is, what functional hierarchies take its place, if any? This volume brings Alfred North Whitehead's process-relational worldview into conversation with deeper empirical perspectives on science and religion, with activist and de/constructive philosophies, with South Asian and indigenous traditions, and with...

Narratology beyond the Human

Credit line: Alexis Rockman, Rat Evolution (1999), oil and acrylic on wood, 15 × 50 inches. Dixon's focus on the expansion of rodent populations and on the emergence of larger species of rats resonates with the Peter Ward's account of ...

Narratology beyond the Human

To what extent, and in what manner, do storytelling practices accommodate nonhuman subjects and their modalities of experience, and how can contemporary narrative study shed light on interspecies interactions and entanglements? In Narratology beyond the Human, David Herman addresses these questions through a cross-disciplinary approach to post-Darwinian narratives concerned with animals and human-animal relationships. Herman considers the enabling and constraining effects of different narrative media, examining a range of fictional and nonfictional texts disseminated in print, comics and graphic novels, and film. In focusing on techniques such as the use of animal narrators, alternation between human and nonhuman perspectives, the embedding of stories within stories, and others, the book explores how specific strategies for portraying nonhuman agents both emerge from and contribute to broader attitudes toward animal life. Herman argues that existing frameworks for narrative inquiry must be modified to take into account how stories are interwoven with cultural ontologies, or understandings of what sorts of beings populate the world and how they relate to humans. Showing how questions of narrative bear on ideas of species difference and assumptions about animal minds, Narratology beyond the Human underscores our inextricable interconnectedness with other forms of creatural life and suggests that stories can be used to resituate imaginaries of human action in a more-than-human world.

Safe Food

ALEXIS ROCKMAN for DNAid FIGURE 28. In conjunction with an exhibition of artworks on the theme " artists picturing our genetic future , ” Alexis Rockman's The Farm appeared on a lower Manhattan billboard ( Lafayette and Houston Streets ) ...

Safe Food

Food safety is a matter of intense public concern, and for good reason. Millions of annual cases of food "poisonings" raise alarm not only about the food served in restaurants and fast-food outlets but also about foods bought in supermarkets. The introduction of genetically modified foods—immediately dubbed "Frankenfoods"—only adds to the general sense of unease. Finally, the events of September 11, 2001, heightened fears by exposing the vulnerability of food and water supplies to attacks by bioterrorists. How concerned should we be about such problems? Who is responsible for preventing them? Who benefits from ignoring them? Who decides? Marion Nestle, author of the critically acclaimed Food Politics, argues that ensuring safe food involves more than washing hands or cooking food to higher temperatures. It involves politics. When it comes to food safety, billions of dollars are at stake, and industry, government, and consumers collide over issues of values, economics, and political power—and not always in the public interest. Although the debates may appear to be about science, Nestle maintains that they really are about control: Who decides when a food is safe? She demonstrates how powerful food industries oppose safety regulations, deny accountability, and blame consumers when something goes wrong, and how century-old laws for ensuring food safety no longer protect our food supply. Accessible, informed, and even-handed, Safe Food is for anyone who cares how food is produced and wants to know more about the real issues underlying today's headlines.

The Cambridge Introduction to Postmodernism

Alexis Rockman, Manifest Destiny (2003–04). Oil and acrylic on wood. 96 in. × 288 in. (243.8 cm × 731.5 cm). Smithsonian American Art Museum, Washington, D.C. Museum purchase through the Lusita L. and Franz H. Denghausen Endowment.

The Cambridge Introduction to Postmodernism

The Cambridge Introduction to Postmodernism surveys the full spectrum of postmodern culture - high and low, avant-garde and popular, famous and obscure - across a range of fields, from architecture and visual art to fiction, poetry, and drama. It deftly maps postmodernism's successive historical phases, from its emergence in the 1960s to its waning in the first decades of the twenty-first century. Weaving together multiple strands of postmodernism - people and places from Andy Warhol, Jefferson Airplane and magical realism, to Jean-François Lyotard, Laurie Anderson and cyberpunk - this book creates a rich picture of a complex cultural phenomenon that continues to exert an influence over our present 'post-postmodern' situation. Comprehensive and accessible, this Introduction is indispensable for scholars, students, and general readers interested in late twentieth-century culture.

Animalities

Invoking the complete destruction of human settlement in New York, painter Alexis Rockman's mural Manifest Destiny6 depicts an urban disasterscape 3,000 years into the future. Displayed in the Brooklyn Museum in 2004, the mural portrays ...

Animalities

New and cutting-edge work in animality studies, human-animal studies, and posthumanismRepresentations of animality continue to proliferate in various kinds of literary and cultural texts. This pioneering volume explores the critical interface between animal and animality studies, marking out the terrain in relation to twentieth-century literature and film. The range of texts considered here is intentionally broad, answering questions like, how do contemporary writers such as Amitav Ghosh, Terry Tempest Williams, and Indra Sinha help us to think about not only animals but also humans as animals? What kinds of creatures are being constructed by contemporary artists such as Patricia Piccinini, Alexis Rockman, and Michael Pestel? How do aanimalities animate such diverse texts as the poetry of two women publishing under the name of aMichael Field, or an early film by Thomas Edison depicting the electrocution of a circus elephant named Topsy? Connecting these issues to fields as diverse as environmental studies and ecocriticism, queer theory, gender studies, feminist theory, illness and disability studies, postcolonial theory, and biopolitics, the volume also raises further questions about disciplinarity itself, while hoping to inspire further work abeyond the human in future interdisciplinary scholarship.Key Features10 provocative case studies focused on representations and discourses of animals and animality in twentieth- and twenty-first-century literature, art, and film in EnglishNew work from both internationally renowned and emerging figures in the burgeoning fields of animality studies, human-animal studies, and posthumanism, suggesting innovative and significant new directions to exploreBroad introduction to the kinds of questions scholars in the humanities have considered in relation to animals and animality

Environmental Criticism for the Twenty First Century

Consider an early example of BioArt:a 1997 diorama by NewYork–based artist Alexis Rockman entitled “Romantic Flower” (Figure 5.1). Figure 5.1 “Romantic Flower,” Alexis Rockman (1997). A threedimensional shadow box,“Romantic ...

Environmental Criticism for the Twenty First Century

Environmental Criticism for the Twenty-First Century showcases the recent explosive expansion of environmental criticism, which is actively transforming three areas of broad interest in contemporary literary and cultural studies: history, scale, and science. With contributors engaging texts from the medieval period through the twenty-first century, the collection brings into focus recent ecocritical concern for the long durations through which environmental imaginations have been shaped. Contributors also address problems of scale, including environmental institutions and imaginations that complicate conventional rubrics such as the national, local, and global. Finally, this collection brings together a set of scholars who are interested in drawing on both the sciences and the humanities in order to find compelling stories for engaging ecological processes such as global climate change, peak oil production, nuclear proliferation, and food scarcity. Environmental Criticism for the Twenty-First Century offers powerful proof that cultural criticism is itself ecologically resilient, evolving to meet the imaginative challenges of twenty-first-century environmental crises.

Living in the Anthropocene

The artist Alexis Rockman is well versed in these alarming statistics and dire environmental predictions. Over the past twenty-five years, he has created an extensive body of work that combines art, history, science, and popular culture ...

Living in the Anthropocene

Explores the causes and implications of the Anthropocene, or Age of Humans, from multiple points of view including anthropological, scientific, social, artistic, and economic. Although we arrived only recently in Earth's timeline, humans are driving major changes to the planet's ecosystems. Even now, the basic requirements for human life--air, water, shelter, food, nature, and culture--are rapidly transforming the planet as billions of people compete for resources. These changes have become so noticeable on a global scale that scientists believe we are living in a new chapter in Earth's story: the Anthropocene, or Age of Humans. Living in the Anthropocene: Earth in the Age of Humans is a vital look at this era. The book contextualizes the Anthropocene by presenting paleontological, historical, and contemporary views of various human effects on Earth. It discusses environmental and biological systems that have been changed and affected; the causes of the Anthropocene, such as agricultural spread, pollution, and urbanization; how societies are responding and adapting to these changes; how these changes have been represented in art, film, television, and literature; and finally, offers a look toward the future of our environment and our own lives.

Creative Climate Communications

For a first example, painter Alexis Rockman is an artist who has long addressed scientific themes in climate change and genetic engineering through his depictions of future North American landscapes. He first waded into these spaces two ...

Creative  Climate  Communications

Through this assessment of creative (climate) communications, readers will understand what works where, when, why and under what conditions.

The Hudson Valley

ManifestDestiny, 2004 Oil on wood, 96 x 288 inches © 2011 Alexis Rockman/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York an impulse ... such as Alexis Rockman, who harnesses the doom of Cole's Destruction (Course of Empire) for maximum effect, ...

The Hudson Valley


Sweet Dreams

Because his work exists at the opposite end of the aesthetic spectrum and is exemplary in its display of virtuoso skill, Alexis Rockman's hyper-realist paintings embody unnatural attitudes in a radically di=erent aesthetic mode (plate ...

Sweet Dreams

Johanna Drucker's "sweet dream" is for a new and more positive approach to contemporary art. Calling for a revamping of the academic critical vocabulary used to discuss art into one more befitting current creative practices, Drucker argues that contemporary art is fully engaged with material culture—yet still struggling to escape the oppositional legacy of the early twentieth-century avant-garde. Drucker shows that artists today are aware of working within the ideologies of mainstream culture and have replaced avant-garde defiance with eager complicity. Finding their materials at flea markets or exploring celebrity culture, contemporary artists have created a vibrantly participatory movement that exudes enthusiasm and affirmation—all while critics continue to cling to an outmoded vocabulary of opposition and radical negativity that defined modernism's avant-garde. At the cutting edge of new media research, Drucker surveys a wide range of exciting contemporary artists, demonstrating their clear departure from the past and petitioning viewers and critics to shift their terms and sensibilities as well. Sweet Dreams is a testament to the creative processes and self-conscious heterogeneity of art today as well as a revolutionary effort to solicit collaboration that will encourage the production of imaginative thought and contribute to contemporary life.