Alley Life in Washington

A significant contribution to the literature of black urban history. -- Journal of Interdisciplinary History.

Alley Life in Washington

A significant contribution to the literature of black urban history. -- Journal of Interdisciplinary History.

Black History

Finally , in Alley Life in Washington : Family , Community , Religion , and Folklife in the City : 1850-1970 ( Urbana , III . , 1980 ) , James Borchert mounts the most concerted attack yet on what he calls the * breakdown thesis .

Black History

An enlightening overview of major aspects of African history, including colonial Africa, slave trade, blacks in the post-emancipation South, blacks during the Reconstruction, and blacks in urban America.

Civil War Washington

(Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1967), 36–37; Constance McLaughlin Green, Washington, Village and Capital, ... James Borchert, Alley Life in Washington: Family, Community, Religion, and Folklife in the City, ...

Civil War Washington

While it is impossible to re-create the tumultuous Washington DC of the Civil War, Civil War Washington sets out to examine the nation’s capital during the Civil War along with the digital platform (civilwardc.org) that reimagines it during those turbulent years. Among the many topics covered in the volume is the federal government’s experiment in compensated emancipation, which went into effect when all of the capital’s slaves were freed in April 1862. Another essay explores the city’s place as a major center of military hospitals, patients, and medical administration. Other contributors reflect on literature and the war, particularly on the poetry published in hospital newspapers and Walt Whitman’s formative experiences with the city and its wounded. The digital project associated with this book offers a virtual examination of the nation’s capital from multiple perspectives. Through a collection of datasets, visual works, texts, and maps, the digital project offers a case study of the social, political, cultural, and scientific transitions provoked or accelerated by the Civil War. The book also provides insights into the complex and ever-shifting nature of ongoing digital projects while encouraging others to develop their own interpretations and participate in the larger endeavor of digital history.

Life Behind a Veil

Many blacks who worked in the center of town lived in alleys simply because it was the best they could afford . ... An important book on alley life is James Borchert , Alley Life in Washington : Family , Community , Religion , and ...

Life Behind a Veil

In the period between the Civil War and the Great Depression, Louisville, Kentucky was host to what George C. Wright calls "a polite form of racism." There were no lynchings or race riots, and to a great extent, Louisville blacks escaped the harsh violence that was a fact of life for blacks in the Deep South. Furthermore, black Louisvillians consistently enjoyed and exercised an oft-contested but never effectively retracted enfranchisement. However, their votes usually did not amount to any real political leverage, and there were no radical improvements in civil rights during this period. Instead, there existed a delicate balance between relative privilege and enforced passivity.A substantial paternalism carried over from antebellum days in Louisville, and many leading white citizens lent support to a limited uplifting of blacks in society. They helped blacks establish their own schools, hospitals, and other institutions. But the dual purpose that such actions served, providing assistance while making the maintenance of strict segregation easier, was not incidental. Whites salved their consequences without really threatening an established order. And blacks, obliged to be grateful for the assistance, generally refrained from arguing for real social and political equality for fear of jeopardizing a partially improved situation and regressing to a status similar to that of other southern blacks.In Life Behind a Veil: Blacks in Louisville, Kentucky, 1865 - 1930, George Wright looks at the particulars of this form of racism. He also looks at the ways in which blacks made the most of their less than ideal position, focusing on the institutions that were central to their lives. Blacks in Louisville boasted the first library for blacks in the United States, as well as black-owned banks, hospitals, churches, settlement houses, and social clubs. These supported and reinforced a sense of community, self-esteem, and pride that was often undermined by the white world.Life Behind a Veil is a comprehensive account of race relations, black response to white discrimination, and the black community behind the walls of segregation in this border town. The title echoes Blyden Jackson's recollection of his childhood in Louisville, where blacks were always aware that there were two very distinct Louisvilles, one of which they were excluded from.

The Quanders

As James Borchert noted in Alley Life in Washington: Family, Community, Religion, and Folklife in the City, 1850–1970, entire communities struggled in makeshift squalid housing in back alleys too frequently filled with vermin, violence, ...

The Quanders

Short of the Book TitleThe selected title of this book, The Quanders – Since 1684: An Enduring African American Legacy, is self-explanatory and becomes more so once the reader delves into the content. Tracing the legacy of Henry Quando and Margrett Pugg, his wife, and their progeny, from 1684 to the present, unfolds a story of triumph and sustained accomplishment beyond and in spite of whatever racially-inspired obstacles were placed as inhibitors on the road to success. Description of the WorkThe Quanders – Since 1684: An Enduring African America Legacy introduces stories that constitute the Quander family legacy as one of the oldest consistently documented African American families in the United States. This is not so much an African American story, as it is an American history story, written from an African American perspective. It features examples of faith, strength, focus, character, and triumph emerging from and beyond a series of imposed stumbling blocks. As well, the author acknowledges the contributions of those who came before and builds upon their achievements and successes to the benefit of future generations.While most Americans respect our nation and its Founding Fathers who made it a reality, the Quander story expands the scope of that recognition by painting smaller parallel stories addressing what else was ongoing, i.e., incidences, events, setbacks, the cumulative effect of which helped us, as people of African descent, to hold our heads just as high as other communities. Indeed, we too shared in the building of this great nation and in seeking to fulfill the American Dream.

The Imperial Season

Washington Post , January 8 , 1909 ; New York Sun , August 27 , 1907 ; Wall Street Daily News , July 5 , 1907. ... D.C. , 1877–1892 , " Records of the Columbia Historical Society 50 ( 1980 ) : 345–59 ; Alley Life in Washington : Family ...

The Imperial Season

This story of the young city of Washington coming up in the international scene is populated with presidents, foreign diplomats, civil servants, architects, artists, and influential hosts and hostesses who were enamored of the idea of world power but had little idea of the responsibilities involved. Between the Spanish American War and World War I, the thrill of America's new international role held the nation's capital in rapture. Visionaries gravitated to Washington and sought to make it the glorious equal to the great European capitals of the day. Remains of the period still define Washington--the monuments and great civic buildings on the Mall as well as the private mansions built on the avenues that now serve as embassies. The first surge of America's world power led to profound changes in diplomacy, and a vibrant official life in Washington, DC, naturally followed. In the twenty-five year period that William Seale terms the "imperial season," a host of characters molded the city in the image of a great world capital. Some of the characters are well known, from presidents to John Hay and Uncle Joe Cannon, and some relatively unknown, from diplomat Alvey Adee to hostess Minnie Townsend and feminist Inez Milholland. The Imperial Season is a unique social history that defines a little explored period of American history that left an indelible mark on our nation's capital.

Jean Toomer and the Terrors of American History

James Borchert , Alley Life in Washington : Family , Community , Religion , and Folklife in the City : 1850–1970 ( Urbana : University of Illinois Press , 1980 ) , 42. One of W.E.B. Du Bois's Atlanta University Studies , The Negro ...

Jean Toomer and the Terrors of American History

In Jean Toomer and the Terrors of American History, Charles Scruggs and Lee VanDemarr examine original sources to show how the cultural wars of the 1920s influenced the shaping of Toomer's writing and subsequent efforts to escape the racial definitions of American society.

Coming of Age in Jim Crow DC

Navigating the Politics of Everyday Life Paula C. Austin ... of Washington's Inhabited Alleys,” in Alley Life in Washington; Jones, Directory of Inhabited Alleys of Washington, D.C.; Jones, Housing of Negroes in Washington, D.C., 41–51, ...

Coming of Age in Jim Crow DC

The fullest account to date of African American young people in a segregated city Coming of Age in Jim Crow DC offers a complex narrative of the everyday lives of black young people in a racially, spatially, economically, and politically restricted Washington, DC, during the 1930s. In contrast to the ways in which young people have been portrayed by researchers, policy makers, law enforcement, and the media, Paula C. Austin draws on previously unstudied archival material to present black poor and working class young people as thinkers, theorists, critics, and commentators as they reckon with the boundaries imposed on them in a Jim Crow city that was also the American emblem of equality. The narratives at the center of this book provide a different understanding of black urban life in the early twentieth century, showing that ordinary people were expert at navigating around the limitations imposed by the District of Columbia’s racially segregated politics. Coming of Age in Jim Crow DC is a fresh take on the New Negro movement, and a vital contribution to the history of race in America.

Black Milwaukee

Borchert , Alley Life in Washington , pp . 218-41 . 29. Lewis Wirth , The Ghetto ( Chicago : University of Chicago Press , 1928 ) , p . 6 . 30. Drake and Cayton , Black Metropolis , pp . 77-91 , 174-213 , 383 . 31.

Black Milwaukee

Other historians have tended to treat black urban life mainly in relation to the ghetto experience, but in Black Milwaukee, Joe William Trotter Jr. offers a new perspective that complements yet also goes well beyond that approach. The blacks in Black Milwaukee were not only ghetto dwellers; they were also industrial workers. The process by which they achieved this status is the subject of Trotter's ground-breaking study. This second edition features a new preface and acknowledgments, an essay on African American urban history since 1985, a prologue on the antebellum and Civil War roots of Milwaukee's black community, and an epilogue on the post-World War II years and the impact of deindustrialization, all by the author. Brief essays by four of Trotter's colleagues--William P. Jones, Earl Lewis, Alison Isenberg, and Kimberly L. Phillips--assess the impact of the original Black Milwaukee on the study of African American urban history over the past twenty years.

Mapping Society

The map was published in T.J. Jones, Directory of Inhabited Alleys of Washington (Washington: Housing Committee Monday Evening Club, ... J. Borchert, Alley Life in Washington: Family, Community, Religion, and Folklife in the City, ...

Mapping Society

From a rare map of yellow fever in eighteenth-century New York, to Charles Booth’s famous maps of poverty in nineteenth-century London, an Italian racial zoning map of early twentieth-century Asmara, to a map of wealth disparities in the banlieues of twenty-first-century Paris, Mapping Society traces the evolution of social cartography over the past two centuries. In this richly illustrated book, Laura Vaughan examines maps of ethnic or religious difference, poverty, and health inequalities, demonstrating how they not only serve as historical records of social enquiry, but also constitute inscriptions of social patterns that have been etched deeply on the surface of cities.

Defender of the Public Interest

For a detailed account of the alley slums , see James Borchert , Alley Life in Washington : Family , Community , Religion , and Folklife in the City , 1850-1970 ( Chicago : University of Illinois Press , 1982 ) .

Defender of the Public Interest

Provides a detailed history of the General Accounting Office from 1921-1966. Also traces the development of accounting and auditing in the United States from the American Revolution to 1921. Describes the passage of the Budget and Accounting Act in 1921.

Confronting the Veil

For more sophisticated discussions of the District's segregation and housing histories, see especially Borchert, Alley Life in Washington; Gillette, Between Justice and Beauty; Mintz, ''A Historical Ethnography''; ...

Confronting the Veil

In this book, Jonathan Holloway explores the early lives and careers of economist Abram Harris Jr., sociologist E. Franklin Frazier, and political scientist Ralph Bunche--three black scholars who taught at Howard University during the New Deal and, together, formed the leading edge of American social science radicalism. Harris, Frazier, and Bunche represented the vanguard of the young black radical intellectual-activists who dared to criticize the NAACP for its cautious civil rights agenda and saw in the turmoil of the Great Depression an opportunity to advocate class-based solutions to what were commonly considered racial problems. Despite the broader approach they called for, both their advocates and their detractors had difficulty seeing them as anything but "black intellectuals" speaking on "black issues." A social and intellectual history of the trio, of Howard University, and of black Washington, Confronting the Veil investigates the effects of racialized thinking on Harris, Frazier, Bunche, and others who wanted to think "beyond race--who envisioned a workers' movement that would eliminate racial divisiveness and who used social science to demonstrate the ways in which race is constructed by social phenomena. Ultimately, the book sheds new light on how people have used race to constrain the possibilities of radical politics and social science thinking.

American Families

Levine , Black Culture and Consciousness ; Gutman , Black Family ; James Borcherr , Alley Life in Washington : Family , Community , Religion , and Folklife in the City , 1850–1970 ( Urbana , 1980 ) , pp . 208 , 210 . 54.

American Families

Essays explore the interaction of race, class, and gender in current scholarship on families, documenting the power structure of family systems throughout American history

Aristocrats of Color the Black Elite 1880 1920 p

145-147 ; Washington Bee , June 20 , 1885 , August 2 , 1902 , December 17 , 1904 , December 28 , 1912 , April 27 ... James Borchert , Alley Life in Washington : Family , Community , Religion , and Folklife in the City , 1850-1970 ...

Aristocrats of Color  the Black Elite 1880 1920  p

Every American city had a small, self-aware, and active black elite, who felt it was their duty to set the standard for the less fortunate members of their race and to lead their communities by example. Professor Gatewood's study examines this class of African Americans by looking at the genealogies and occupations of specific families and individuals throughout the United States and their roles in their various communities. --from publisher description.

Liberty and Justice for All

On alley dwellings, seeJames Borchert, Alley Life in Washington: Family, Community, Religion, and Folklife in the City, 1850–1970 (Urbana, 1980). 7. Records relating to loyalty-security hearings for federal employees were not ...

Liberty and Justice for All

From the congressional debate over the "fall of China" to the drama of the Army-McCarthy hearings to the kitchen faceoff between Richard Nixon and Nikita Khrushchev, the political history of the early Cold War was long dominated by studies of presidential administrations, anticommunism, and foreign policy. In Liberty and Justice for All? a group of distinguished historians representing a variety of disciplinary perspectives--social history, cultural history, intellectual history, labor history, urban history, women's history, African American studies, and media studies--expand on the political history of the early Cold War by rethinking the relationship between politics and culture. How, for example, did folk music help to keep movement culture alive throughout the 1950s? How did the new medium of television change fundamental assumptions about politics and the electorate? How did American experiences with religion in the 1950s strengthen the separation of church and state? How did race, class, and gender influence the relationship between citizens and the state? These are just some of the questions addressed in this wide-ranging set of essays. In addition to volume editor Kathleen G. Donohue, contributors include Howard Brick, Kari Frederickson, Andrea Friedman, David Greenberg, Grace Elizabeth Hale, Jennifer Klein, Laura McEnaney, Kevin M. Schultz, Jason Scott Smith, Landon R. Y. Storrs, and Jessica Weiss.

Mrs Dred Scott

This pattern of alley living seems to have been prevalent in many antebellum cities. See, for example, Borchert, Alley Life in Washington. Dacus and Buel, A Tour of St. Louis, 415–16 (detail of clabber alley in St. Louis neighborhoods).

Mrs  Dred Scott

Among the most infamous U.S. Supreme Court decisions is Dred Scott v. Sandford . Despite the case's signal importance as a turning point in America's history, the lives of the slave litigants have receded to the margins of the record, as conventional accounts have focused on the case's judges and lawyers. In telling the life of Harriet, Dred's wife and co-litigant in the case, this book provides a compensatory history to the generations of work that missed key sources only recently brought to light. Moreover, it gives insight into the reasons and ways that slaves used the courts to establish their freedom. A remarkable piece of historical detective work, Mrs. Dred Scott chronicles Harriet's life from her adolescence on the 1830s Minnesota-Wisconsin frontier, to slavery-era St. Louis, through the eleven years of legal wrangling that ended with the high court's notorious decision. The book not only recovers her story, but also reveals that Harriet may well have been the lynchpin in this pivotal episode in American legal history. Reconstructing Harriet Scott's life through innovative readings of journals, military records, court dockets, and even frontier store ledgers, VanderVelde offers a stunningly detailed account that is at once a rich portrait of slave life, an engrossing legal drama, and a provocative reassessment of a central event in U.S. constitutional history. More than a biography, the book is a deep social history that freshly illuminates some of the major issues confronting antebellum America, including the status of women, slaves, Free Blacks, and Native Americans.

District of Columbia Appropriations for 1999 Operating budget and financial plan FY 1999

Total : D. DESCRIPTION and JUSTIFICATION The history of alleys is well documented in Alley Life in Washington : Family , Community . Religion , and Folklife in the City 1850-1970 by Page 490 C. FUNDING SCHEDULE ( 0000 ) Implementing ...

District of Columbia Appropriations for 1999  Operating budget and financial plan  FY 1999


Race Class and Politics in the Cappuccino City

Alley Life in Washington: Family, Community, Religion, and Folklife in the City, 1850–1970. Urbana: University of Illinois Press. Boyd, Michelle R. 2008. Jim Crow Nostalgia: Reconstructing Race in Bronzeville.

Race  Class  and Politics in the Cappuccino City

For long-time residents of Washington, DC’s Shaw/U Street, the neighborhood has become almost unrecognizable in recent years. Where the city’s most infamous open-air drug market once stood, a farmers’ market now sells grass-fed beef and homemade duck egg ravioli. On the corner where AM.PM carryout used to dish out soul food, a new establishment markets its $28 foie gras burger. Shaw is experiencing a dramatic transformation, from “ghetto” to “gilded ghetto,” where white newcomers are rehabbing homes, developing dog parks, and paving the way for a third wave coffee shop on nearly every block. Race, Class, and Politics in the Cappuccino City is an in-depth ethnography of this gilded ghetto. Derek S. Hyra captures here a quickly gentrifying space in which long-time black residents are joined, and variously displaced, by an influx of young, white, relatively wealthy, and/or gay professionals who, in part as a result of global economic forces and the recent development of central business districts, have returned to the cities earlier generations fled decades ago. As a result, America is witnessing the emergence of what Hyra calls “cappuccino cities.” A cappuccino has essentially the same ingredients as a cup of coffee with milk, but is considered upscale, and is double the price. In Hyra’s cappuccino city, the black inner-city neighborhood undergoes enormous transformations and becomes racially “lighter” and more expensive by the year.

In Their Own Interests

James Borchert found that the working - class residents of Washington's alley dwellings were especially attracted to the storefront churches . ( Alley Life in Washington [ Urbana : University of Illinois Press , 1980 ] , pp .

In Their Own Interests

Since the Civil War, African Americans have made great efforts to empower themselves. Focusing on Norfolk, Virginia, Earl Lewis shows how blacks have had to balance competing inclinations for conscious inaction and purposeful agitation as they sought to promote their own interests at home and in the workplace. In Their Own Interests presents a cross-section of southern urban blacks—the power-brokers and lesser-knowns, Garvey followers and communist enthusiasts—who came to live in Norfolk between the Civil War and the Civil Rights Movement. Lewis seeks to recreate the texture of African-American life by examining the lives of the people after they moved to the city—the jobs and assistance they secured, the houses, families, and institutions they built, the battles they waged, and the culture they shared. In Their Own Interests moves African-American urban and social history beyond the current intellectual crossroads. Drawing on a variety of sources, Lewis tells the interconnected story of race, class, and power in twentieth-century Norfolk. His study has far-reaching implications and should be of wide interest.

Labor of Love Labor of Sorrow

On neighborhoods and mobility see, for example, Borchert, Alley Life in Washington, 123-127; Bodnar, Simon, and Weber, Lives of Their Own, 217; Johnson, Shadow of the Plantation, 25. See also Mebane, Mary, 11-12, 18, 47; interview with ...

Labor of Love  Labor of Sorrow

The forces that shaped the institution of slavery in the American South endured, albeit in altered form, long after slavery was abolished. Toiling in sweltering Virginia tobacco factories or in the kitchens of white families in Chicago, black women felt a stultifying combination of racial discrimination and sexual prejudice. And yet, in their efforts to sustain family ties, they shared a common purpose with wives and mothers of all classes. In Labor of Love, Labor of Sorrow, historian Jacqueline Jones offers a powerful account of the changing role of black women, lending a voice to an unsung struggle from the depths of slavery to the ongoing fight for civil rights.