Alternative Rhetorics

Introduction Moving Beyond Traditions : Exploring the Need for " Alternative Rhetorics " LAURA GRAY - ROSENDALE AND SIBYLLE GRUBER W hen we talk about rhetorical theory , many of us think of classical rhetoricians such as Aristotle ...

Alternative Rhetorics

Challenges the traditional rhetorical canon.

Rhetorics for Community Action

But the refusal to entertain alternate rhetorical practices is a refusal to experience the alternative worldviews ... When we do not allow for the alternative rhetorics of the counterpublics to circulate, when we insist that the current ...

Rhetorics for Community Action

Rhetorics for Community Action: Public Writing and Writing Publics, by Phyllis Mentzell Ryder, offers theory and pedagogy to introduce public writing as a complex political and creative action. To write public texts, we have to invent the public we wish to address. Such invention is a complex task, with many components to consider: exigency that brings people together; a sense of agency and capacity; a sense of how the world is and what it can become. All these components constantly compete against texts that put forward other public ideals_opposing ideas about who really has power and who really can create change. Teachers of public writing must adopt a generous response to those who venture into this arena. Some scholars believe that to prepare students for public life, university classes should partner with grassroots community organizations, rather than nonprofits that serve food or tutor students. They worry that a service-related focus will create more passive citizens who do not rally and resist or grab the attention of government leaders or corporations. With carefully contextualized study of an after-school arts program, an area soup kitchen, and parks organizations, among others, Ryder shows that many so-called 'service' organizations are not passive places at all, and she argues that the main challenge of public work is precisely that it has to take place among all of these compelling definitions of democracy. Ryder proposes teaching public writing by partnering with multiple community nonprofits. She develops a framework to help students analyze how their community partners inspire people to action, and offers a course design that support them as they convey those public ideals in community texts. But composing public texts is only part of the challenge. Traditional newspapers and magazines, through their business models and writing styles, reinforce a dominant role for citizens as thinking and reading, but not necessarily acting. This civic role is also professed in the university, where students are taught writing that extends inquiry. Phyllis Mentzell Ryder's Rhetorics for Community Action: Public Writing and Writing Publics turns to the rhetorical practices of nondominant American communities and counterpublics, whose resistance to 'good' public speech and 'proper' public behavior reveals alternate modes of composing and acting in democracy.

Rhetoric before and beyond the Greeks

We endorse Miller's observation that the fields of rhetoric and composition have increasingly become interested in alternate rhetorics, different from those in the Aristotelian tradition. In the later twentieth century, the dominance of ...

Rhetoric before and beyond the Greeks

Examines rhetorical practices in cultures and time periods that have received little attention to date.

The Consequences of Economic Rhetoric

Even those who approvingly recognize theories to be alternative rhetorics or idea systems or language games often fall back in their own work to positions of epistemological essentialism , assertions that their rhetoric is somehow ...

The Consequences of Economic Rhetoric

The papers in this volume are drawn from a recent conference at Wellesley College for both theoretical and applied economists, which explored the consequences of rhetoric and conversation within the field of economics.

Food Feminisms Rhetorics

In the 2007 collection Rural Literacies, Eileen Schell calls for an “alternative agrarian rhetoric” in pursuit of sustainable, equitable food systems. More specifically, Schell advocates—following Kenneth Burke—a rhetoric of persuasion.

Food  Feminisms  Rhetorics

Inspired by the need for interpretations and critiques of the varied messages surrounding what and how we eat, Food, Feminisms, Rhetorics collects eighteen essays that demonstrate the importance of food and food-related practices as sites of scholarly study, particularly from feminist rhetorical perspectives. Contributors analyze messages about food and bodies—from what a person watches and reads to where that person shops—taken from sources mundane and literary, personal and cultural. This collection begins with analyses of the historical, cultural, and political implications of cookbooks and recipes; explores definitions of feminist food writing; and ends with a focus on bodies and cultures—both self-representations and representations of others for particular rhetorical purposes. The genres, objects, and practices contributors study are varied—from cookbooks to genre fiction, from blogs to food systems, from product packaging to paintings—but the overall message is the same: food and its associated practices are worthy of scholarly attention.

Jesus Rhetoric and Law

The eclipse of rhetorical tradition and its replacement by alternative rhetorics has a double impact . First , the immediate background of most new rhetorics and of their application to the New Testament is not the tradition of ...

Jesus  Rhetoric and Law

This book uses Greco-Roman theories and practice of gnomic speech to elaborate a rhetorical-critical model of the interaction of memory, performance and composition in the public discourse of Jesus and of both his oral and gospel-writing interpreters.

Guiguzi China s First Treatise on Rhetoric

“The Alternative Feminist Discourse of Post-Mao Chinese Writers: A Perspective from the Rhetorical Situation.” Alternative Rhetorics: Challenges to the Rhetorical Tradition. Ed. Laura Gray-Rosendale and Sibylle Gruber.

 Guiguzi   China s First Treatise on Rhetoric

At around the same time that Aristotle was active in ancient Greece, many students in China, including Sun Tzu, who would later write The Art of War, were learning the techniques of persuasion from Guiguzi, "the Master of the Ghost Valley." This pre-Qin dynasty recluse produced what is considered the earliest Chinese treatise devoted entirely to the art of persuasion. Called Guiguzi after its author, the text provides an indigenous rhetorical theory and key persuasive strategies, some of which are still used by those involved in decision making and negotiations in China today. In "Guiguzi," China's First Treatise on Rhetoric, Hui Wu and C. Jan Swearingen present a new critical translation of this foundational work, which has great historical significance for the study of Chinese rhetoric and communication and yet is little known to Western readers.

Rhetoric and the Digital Humanities

It is not “minority” rhetorics, or “alternativerhetorics. Cultural rhetorics is an interdisciplinary field of study, a scholarly practice, and a category for interpreting the world around us. Cultural rhetoricians draw from across ...

Rhetoric and the Digital Humanities

The digital humanities is a rapidly growing field that is transforming humanities research through digital tools and resources. Researchers can now quickly trace every one of Issac Newton’s annotations, use social media to engage academic and public audiences in the interpretation of cultural texts, and visualize travel via ox cart in third-century Rome or camel caravan in ancient Egypt. Rhetorical scholars are leading the revolution by fully utilizing the digital toolbox, finding themselves at the nexus of digital innovation. Rhetoric and the Digital Humanities is a timely, multidisciplinary collection that is the first to bridge scholarship in rhetorical studies and the digital humanities. It offers much-needed guidance on how the theories and methodologies of rhetorical studies can enhance all work in digital humanities, and vice versa. Twenty-three essays over three sections delve into connections, research methodology, and future directions in this field. Jim Ridolfo and William Hart-Davidson have assembled a broad group of more than thirty accomplished scholars. Read together, these essays represent the cutting edge of research, offering guidance that will energize and inspire future collaborations.

Rhetoric and Reality

They too are intolerant of alternative rhetorics. A democracy, however, ordinarily provides political and social supports for open discussion, allowing for the free play of possibilities in the rhetorics that appear—although these ...

Rhetoric and Reality

Intended for teachers of college composition, this history of major and minor developments in the teaching of writing in twentieth-century American colleges employs a taxonomy of theories based on the three epistemological categories (objective, subjective, and transactional) dominating rhetorical theory and practice. The first section of the book provides an overview of the three theories, specifically their assumptions and rhetorics. The main chapters cover the following topics: (1) the nineteenth-century background, on the formation of the English department and the subsequent relationship of rhetoric and poetic; (2) the growth of the discipline (1900-1920), including the formation of the National Council of Teachers of English, the appearance of the major schools of rhetoric, the efficiency movement, graduate education in rhetoric, undergraduate courses and the Great War; (3) the influence of progressive education (1920-1940), including the writing program and current-traditional rhetoric, liberal culture, and expressionistic and social rhetoric; (4) the communication emphasis (1940-1960), including the communications course, the founding of the Conference on College Composition and Communication, literature and composition, linguistics and composition, and the revival of rhetoric; and (5) the renaissance of rhetoric and major rhetorical approaches (1960-1975), including contemporary theories based on the three epistemic categories. A final chapter briefly surveys developments through 1987. (JG)

Activist Rhetorics and American Higher Education 1885 1937

It was against the entrenched elitism of this long tradition that many of the educators I name here designed alternative rhetoric courses , courses overtly politicized in terms of the interests of specific student constituencies ...

Activist Rhetorics and American Higher Education  1885 1937

In this study of the history of rhetoric education, Susan Kates focuses on the writing and speaking instruction developed at three academic institutions founded to serve three groups of students most often excluded from traditional institutions of higher education in late-nineteenth-and early-twentieth-century America: white middle-class women, African Americans, and members of the working class. Kates provides a detailed look at the work of those students and teachers ostracized from rhetorical study at traditional colleges and universities. She explores the pedagogies of educators Mary Augusta Jordan of Smith College in Northhampton, Massachusetts; Hallie Quinn Brown of Wilberforce University in Wilberforce, Ohio; and Josephine Colby, Helen Norton, and Louise Budenz of Brookwood Labor College in Katonah, New York. These teachers sought to enact forms of writing and speaking instruction incorporating social and political concerns in the very essence of their pedagogies. They designed rhetoric courses characterized by three important pedagogical features: a profound respect for and awareness of the relationship between language and identity and a desire to integrate this awareness into the curriculum; politicized writing and speaking assignments designed to help students interrogate their marginalized standing within the larger culture in terms of their gender, race, or social class; and an emphasis on service and social responsibility.

Rhetorics of Reason and Desire

This alternative rhetoric is further developed by the Early Christians: from the writings of the early Fathers and the paintings in the Roman catacombs one can extract a model in which the relationship between speaker and audience had ...

Rhetorics of Reason and Desire

Rhetorics of Reason and Desire traces the appearance of rhetoric in key literary works from classical times to the Middle Ages, focusing on the reception and transformation of Ciceronian rhetoric in Vergil's Aeneid, Augustine's Confessions and On Christian Doctrine, and the lyrics of the early troubadours.

Best of the Independent Journals in Rhetoric and Composition 2014

composition scholar to “call to expand the linguistic and rhetorical canon [... and articulate a] need we need alterative rhetorics that work in practice” (11, 19). He explains: For alternative rhetoric as I define it, embodiment must ...

Best of the Independent Journals in Rhetoric and Composition 2014

THE BEST OF THE INDEPENDENT RHETORIC AND COMPOSITION JOURNALS 2014 represents the result of a nationwide conversation—beginning with journal editors, but expanding to teachers, scholars and workers across the discipline of Rhetoric and Composition—to select essays that showcase the innovative and transformative work now being published in the field’s independent journals.

New Approaches to Rhetoric

Laura Gray-Rosendale and Sibylle Gruber (2001), editors of Alternative Rhetorics: Challenges to the Rhetorical Tradition, “emphasize multiplicity and fragmentation within and between different rhetorics and different traditions” (p. 5).

New Approaches to Rhetoric

New Approaches to Rhetoric provides fresh perspectives on the study of rhetoric and its ability to affect change in today's society. Although traditional approaches (e.g., neo-Aristotelian) to the study of rhetoric have utility for the twenty-first century, communication in a complex, mass-mediated postmodern age calls for new critical approaches. The contributors of this volume, including James Darsey, Kathryn M. Olson and G. Thomas Goodnight, George Cheney, Dana Cloud, and Barry Brummett, explore possibilities for bridging rhetorical studies of the past with rhetorical studies of the future. The original essays invite students to join rhetorical theorists and critics in an ongoing dialogue concerning what it means to study communication in a postmodern world. New Approaches to Rhetoric is ideal for upper-level undergraduate and graduate courses in Rhetoric and in Political Communication in departments of Communication, English, and Political Science. This book is suitable for use as either a primary or supplemental course text and will be invaluable as a general reference for scholars of rhetoric, social movements, and public sphere studies.

Rhetoric Online

Work on Online Public Discourse in Composition Studies and Technical Rhetoric Two contributions to Alternative Rhetorics — a book described by one reviewer as focusing on research areas that have been “ marginalized or ignored ” ( Ono ...

Rhetoric Online

Rhetoric Online is a systematic examination of the forms and nature of Web-based public discourse in the fields of social activism, political campaigning, and other venues where rhetorical discourses are addressed to public audiences. Warnick develops and adapts existing rhetorical theories to the study of Web-based persuasive discourse in the public sphere.

Rhetoric and Guns

However, there are alternative rhetorics to the rhetoric of prevention. Rather than feeling immobilized and retraumatized, those who focus on perseverance can remind themselves of what they have been through already and stay strong even ...

Rhetoric and Guns

Guns hold a complex place in American culture. Over 30,000 Americans die each year from gun violence, and guns are intimately connected to issues of public health, as is evident whenever a mass shooting occurs. But guns also play an important role in many Americans’ lives that is not reducible to violence and death—as tools, sporting equipment, and identity markers. They are also central to debates about constitutional rights, as seen in ongoing discussions about the Second Amendment, and they are a continuous source of legislative concern, as apparent in annual ratings of gun-supporting legislators. Even as guns are wrapped up with other crucial areas of concern, they are also fundamentally a rhetorical concern. Guns and gun violence occupy a unique rhetorical space in the United States, one characterized by silent majorities, like most gun owners; vocal minorities, like the firearm industry and gun lobby; and a stalemate that fails to stem the flood of the dead. How Americans talk, deliberate, and fight about guns is vital to how guns are marketed, used, and regulated. A better understanding of the rhetorics of guns and gun violence can help Americans make better arguments about them in the world. However, where guns are concerned, rhetorical studies is not terribly different from American culture more generally. Guns are ever-present and exercise powerful effects, but they are commonly talked about in oblique, unsystematic ways. Rhetoric and Guns advances more direct, systematic engagement in the field and beyond by analyzing rhetoric about guns, guns in rhetoric, and guns as rhetoric, particularly as they relate to specific instances of guns in culture. The authors attempt to understand rhetoric’s relationship to guns by analyzing rhetoric about guns and how they function in and as rhetoric related to specific instances—in media coverage, political speech, marketing, and advertising. Original chapters from scholars in rhetorical studies, communication, education, and related fields elucidate how rhetoric is used to maintain and challenge the deadly status quo of gun violence in the United States and extend rhetoricians’ sustained interest in the fields’ relationships to violence, brutality, and atrocity. Contributors: Ira J. Allen, Brian Ballentine, Matthew Boedy, Peter Buckland, Lisa Corrigan, Rosa Eberly, Kendall Gerdes, Ian E. J. Hill, Nathalie Kuriowa-Lewis, Patricia Roberts-Miller, Craig Rood, Bradley Serber, Catherine R. Squires

Rhetoric in the Rest of the West

... continual exclusion of medieval mystical women writers' rhetoric has prevented us from recognizing alternative rhetorics different from the claimed tradition of the medieval rhetoric as well as from the western classical rhetoric.

Rhetoric in the Rest of the West

While the study of the history of rhetoric has expanded to include an ever-growing range of rhetorical traditions, lesser-known figures, and under- and un-studied texts, it has continued to exist in the hermetically sealed binary of West and Rest. Rhetorical scholars have begun uncovering the many marginalized rhetorical traditions silenced by the homogenous nature of our histories themselves, reading and writing new histories of the rhetorical tradition through frames from gender to geography. Despite these substantial challenges to the traditionally received history of rhetoric, many voices are still silenced and many spaces are still excluded—voices speaking within the spaces of the less-than-monolithic West itself. This silencing and excluding continues, perhaps, because of assumptions that no texts exist from these marginalized voices or that substantial rhetorical activity was not conducted in these marginalized spaces—regardless of already extant evidence of rhetorical activity as diverse as rural civic ethos in Classical Greece and Etruscan influences on Roman rhetoric or long-standing passive knowledge of scholarly activity in Medieval Andalusia and Ireland. Rhetoric in the Rest of the West attempts to expand the conversation in those gaps in the history of rhetoric by examining the traditions that lost the cultural competition and have been shrouded in the shadow of the rhetorical tradition.

Christianity and the Rhetoric of Empire

The seemingly alternative rhetorics , the classical or pagan and the Christian , were more nearly one than their respective practitioners , interested in scoring off each other , would have us believe . Building on the tendency to ...

Christianity and the Rhetoric of Empire

Many reasons can be given for the rise of Christianity in late antiquity and its flourishing in the medieval world. In asking how Christianity succeeded in becoming the dominant ideology in the unpromising circumstances of the Roman Empire, Averil Cameron turns to the development of Christian discourse over the first to sixth centuries A.D., investigating the discourse's essential characteristics, its effects on existing forms of communication, and its eventual preeminence. Scholars of late antiquity and general readers interested in this crucial historical period will be intrigued by her exploration of these influential changes in modes of communication. The emphasis that Christians placed on language--writing, talking, and preaching--made possible the formation of a powerful and indeed a totalizing discourse, argues the author. Christian discourse was sufficiently flexible to be used as a public and political instrument, yet at the same time to be used to express private feelings and emotion. Embracing the two opposing poles of logic and mystery, it contributed powerfully to the gradual acceptance of Christianity and the faith's transformation from the enthusiasm of a small sect to an institutionalized world religion.

Alternative Rhetorics

Challenges the traditional rhetorical canon.

Alternative Rhetorics

Challenges the traditional rhetorical canon.

End Of Knowing

Central (in our view, far too central) to Gergen's reconstructionist stance is rhetoric. He says: From the standpoint of relational politics, it is essential to develop alternative rhetorics. This is not because we need prettier, ...

End Of Knowing

First published in 1997. This volume discusses the notion of whether there is a limit to knowledge and 'One Way to Know', in addition to the suggestion that that we no longer need to know, and whether our continued employment of knowing (cognition, epistemology) is useful or useless and destructive of human life and development.

Ecofeminism and Rhetoric

Influenced by cultural ecofeminism, especially the writings of Charlene Spretnak and Sally Miller Gearhart on feminist spirituality, Kindred envisions and practices an alternative “invitational rhetoric” predicated on the creation of ...

Ecofeminism and Rhetoric

By drawing on the complex interplay of ecology and feminism, ecofeminists identify links between the domination of nature and the oppression of women. This volume introduces a variety of innovative approaches for advancing ecofeminist activism, demonstrating how words exert power in the world. Contributors explore the interconnections between the dualisms of nature/culture and masculine/feminine, providing new insights into sex and technology through such wide-ranging topics as canine reproduction, orangutan motherhood and energy conservation. Ecofeminist rhetorics of care address environmental problems through cooperation and partnership, rather than hierarchical subordination, encouraging forms of communication that value mutual understanding over persuasion and control. By critically examining ways that theory can help deconstruct domineering practices-exposing the underlying ideologies-a new generation of ecofeminist scholarship illuminates the transformative capacity of language to foster emancipation and liberation.