American Flying Boats and Amphibious Aircraft

This work is a comprehensive, heavily illustrated history of the many flying boats and amphibious aircraft designed and built in the United States.

American Flying Boats and Amphibious Aircraft

This work is a comprehensive, heavily illustrated history of the many flying boats and amphibious aircraft designed and built in the United States. It is divided into three chronological sections: the early era (1912–1928), the golden era (1928–1945), and the post-war era (1945–present), with historical overviews of each period. Within each section, individual aircraft types are listed in alphabetical order by manufacturer or builder, with historical background, technical specifications, drawings, and one or more photographs. Appendices cover lesser known flying boat and amphibian types as well as various design concepts that never achieved the flying stage.

Flying Boats Seaplanes

Beginning with races that were staged at elegant French resorts in the early part of the century, flying boats and seaplanes have played an integral part in aviation history.

Flying Boats   Seaplanes

Beginning with races that were staged at elegant French resorts in the early part of the century, flying boats and seaplanes have played an integral part in aviation history. World War I spurred the development of these machines, and by the 1930s, flying boats and seaplanes had become pioneers in transcontinental flight. This photo-filled history recalls the role of flying boats and seaplanes in civil and military aviation history, and the enthusiasm of the engineers and pilots who are associated with their development. In addition to the golden years of hydraviation prior to World War II, author Nicolaou examines the decline of the seaplane, and its subsequent renaissance in nations that are today considered seaplane paradises. The saga is illustrated by more than 200 rare photographs uncovered in archives around the globe.

Flying Boats

Please note that the content of this book primarily consists of articles available from Wikipedia or other free sources online.

Flying Boats

Please note that the content of this book primarily consists of articles available from Wikipedia or other free sources online. Pages: 71. Chapters: Aichi E10A, Aichi E11A, Aichi H9A, Akaflieg Munchen Mu1 Vogel Roch, Beriev Be-12, Blohm & Voss BV 222, Boeing 314, Bombardier 415, Breguet 521, Canadair CL-215, Consolidated PB2Y Coronado, Consolidated PBY Catalina, Curtiss Model H, Dornier Do X, Dornier S-Ray 007, Dornier Seastar, Felixstowe F.5, Flying boat, Grumman G-44 Widgeon, Grumman G-73 Mallard, Grumman HU-16 Albatross, Hansa-Brandenburg CC, Harbin SH-5, Hiro H4H, Kawanishi H3K, Kawanishi H6K, Kawanishi H8K, Loire 130, Macchi M.3, Martin M-130, Martin P5M Marlin, Martin P6M SeaMaster, Pemberton-Billing P.B.1, Rohrbach Ro II, Saunders-Roe Princess, Savoia-Marchetti SM.62, ShinMaywa US-2, Shin Meiwa US-1A, Sikorsky S-36, Sikorsky S-38, Sikorsky S-39, Sikorsky S-40, Sikorsky S-42, Sikorsky S-43, Sikorsky VS-44, Singular SA03, Vickers Viking, Yokosuka H5Y. Excerpt: The Consolidated PBY Catalina was an American flying boat, and later an amphibious aircraft of the 1930s and 1940s produced by Consolidated Aircraft. It was one of the most widely used multi-role aircraft of World War II. Catalinas served with every branch of the United States Armed Forces and in the air forces and navies of many other nations. During World War II, PBYs were used in anti-submarine warfare, patrol bombing, convoy escorts, search and rescue missions (especially air-sea rescue), and cargo transport. The PBY was the most numerous aircraft of its kind and the last active military PBYs were not retired from service until the 1980s. Even today, over 70 years after its first flight, the aircraft continues to fly as a waterbomber (or airtanker) in aerial firefighting operations all over the world. The designation "PBY" was determined in accordance with the U.S. Navy aircraft designation system of 1922; PB representing "Patrol Bomber" and Y being the code assigned to Consolidated Aircraft as...

Jet Flying Boats

In this book, aviation historian David Oliver covers the little-known flying-boat legacy of the Second World War.

Jet Flying Boats

In this book, aviation historian David Oliver covers the little-known flying-boat legacy of the Second World War.

The American Flying Boat

First published in 1979, this fully illustrated study includes complete data on all of the Navy's flying boats since 1912.

The American Flying Boat

First published in 1979, this fully illustrated study includes complete data on all of the Navy's flying boats since 1912.

High Hulls

This volume contains their stories, from memorable aircraft such as the Short Sunderland and Boeing 314 Clipper, to the craft that roamed the Pacific Theatre of the Second World War, to forgotten giants from Saunders-Roe and even strange ...

High Hulls

For a time, the flying boat was seen as the way of the future. These aircraft, so strange and foreign to the modern mind, once criss-crossed the world and fulfilled essential military roles. In his latest book for Fonthill, Charles Bain looks at the golden age of the flying boat, when these sometimes strange and often beautiful vessels spanned the globe. These vessels-a combination of ship and airplane-found themselves working as patrol aircraft, passenger aircraft, transports, and even as combat aircraft. This volume contains their stories, from memorable aircraft such as the Short Sunderland and Boeing 314 Clipper, to the craft that roamed the Pacific Theatre of the Second World War, to forgotten giants from Saunders-Roe and even strange jet fighters that once landed like ducks. It even includes the flying boat that has not let time get in the way of doing its job-the Martin Mars. Each of these aircraft has a story worthy of the telling, and often a memorable role to play in the history of aviation. `High Hulls' delves deeply into a long-vanished part of aviation's golden age.

Flying Boats

Flying Boats


Operational History of the Flying Boat

Contents:ethods of tending seaplanes:1941 Comment on British and American operational practices Notes on German flying boats and seaplane operations Aircraft and operational procedures Operational experience.

Operational History of the Flying Boat

Contents:ethods of tending seaplanes:1941 Comment on British and American operational practices Notes on German flying boats and seaplane operations Aircraft and operational procedures Operational experience.

Flying with Floats

Flying with Floats


Wings on the River

Wings on the River traces the whole flying boat era in Australia through its many changes, its triumphs and adversities, including: Pioneering flights between the wars by overseas and local flying boats alighting in the heart of the city; ...

Wings on the River


Flying Boats Amphibians Since 1945

The development of compact, reliable and economical turbo-prop engines in recent years has given the flying boat and amphibian a new lease of life, not only by extending the lives of some types by replacing existing piston engines, but also ...

Flying Boats   Amphibians Since 1945

The development of compact, reliable and economical turbo-prop engines in recent years has given the flying boat and amphibian a new lease of life, not only by extending the lives of some types by replacing existing piston engines, but also by encouraging new designs that are able to compete favourably with landplanes in terms of economy while retaining their unique ability to land on water if and when necessary.

China Clipper

To fully document the story he includes interviews with flying boat pioneers and a dynamic collection of photographs, charts, and cutaway illustrations.

China Clipper

When the China Clipper shattered aviation records on its maiden six-day flight from California to the Orient in 1935, the flying boat became an instant celebrity. This lively history by Robert Gandt traces the development of the great flying boats as both a triumph of technology and a stirring human drama. He examines the political, military, and economic forces that drove its development and explains the aeronautical advances that made the aircraft possible. To fully document the story he includes interviews with flying boat pioneers and a dynamic collection of photographs, charts, and cutaway illustrations.

Corsairville

It was the obscure legend of the lying boat Corsair, recued from the Belgian Congo in an epic salvage operation, that fired Graham Coster's quest for the lost world of the flying boat.

Corsairville

It was the obscure legend of the lying boat Corsair, recued from the Belgian Congo in an epic salvage operation, that fired Graham Coster's quest for the lost world of the flying boat. Coster's journey begins in Southampton, from where Imperial Airways' Empire boats departed to fly up the Nile on their way to South Africa, and takes him to the flying boats' old haunts in Uganda, Kenya, Malawi and Zimbabwe, from Lake Naivasha to Victoria Falls.

The Allied Defense of the Malay Barrier 1941 1942

These planes and their American instructors were attached to the MLD Flight School at the main seaplane base at ... 18 seaplanes. Fortyeight were bought by the Dutch and constructed by Douglas; the MLD received only six planes before ...

The Allied Defense of the Malay Barrier  1941      1942

Though few realize it, the Netherlands East Indies were the object of Japan’s attack on Pearl Harbor in December 1941. Likewise, their invasions of Guam, Wake Island and the Philippines were mainly diversionary operations to safeguard their main assault on Dutch and British colonies. Since the end of World War I, Japan had coveted the vast East Indies oil reserves, and the colony had feared invasion since Germany overran Holland in May 1940. Isolated politically the weakly defended archipelago was a tempting prize. The East Indies government initially maintained a strict policy of neutrality while desperately working to build up its military strength. As Japanese actions pushed the region toward war, the Dutch reluctantly embraced closer ties with America and Britain. For a brief period, the East Indies were key players in Pacific War strategy. This book details for the first time in English the Dutch prewar strategy, their efforts to counter Japanese espionage and their sizable though largely forgotten military contribution in the early months of the Pacific War.

LaGuardia Airport

LaGuardia Airport, named for the mayor of New York in the mid 1930s is one of America's busiest airports and has undergone great change throughout the years.

LaGuardia Airport

Constructed closer to Manhattan than the commercially unsuccessful Floyd Bennett Field, LaGuardia Airport was conceived in the mid-1930s as New York City mayor Fiorello LaGuardia realized the need for a great airport for one of the world’s great cities. Originally known as New York Municipal Airport, the popular airport soon had its name changed to recognize LaGuardia’s enormous contribution to the project. At the time of its opening in 1939, it was the largest and most advanced commercial airport in the world with terminals considered art deco masterpieces. Although a very large airport for the era in which it was built, by the late 1940s it was the world’s busiest airport and clearly too small for the increasing amount of air traffic. Through the years its runways were lengthened and facilities were improved to handle larger and faster aircraft. Still one of America’s busiest airports, LaGuardia has witnessed the steady progress of American commercial aviation, from flying boats to jetliners.

Seaplanes

This lavishly illustrated volume traces the development of the seaplane over the past century with first-hand accounts from pilots and passengers, and more than one hundred full-color and archival photographs.

Seaplanes

For as long as man has been able to fly, he has been interested in taking off and landing from the water. The surfaces of lakes and bays offered smooth, long, and perfectly level areas to serve as liquid runways, and could make for a somewhat softer landing in the event of a crash. This colorful volume tells the story of the seaplane, from the earliest floats to the monsters of World War II, to the brave little bushplanes that rule remote areas of Canada, South America, and Australia. Seaplanes developed right alongside regular aircraft; in fact, the Wright brother's trailblazing efforts at Kitty Hawk were very nearly eclipsed by an almost-airworthy seaplane, Samuel Pierpont Langley's experimental float plane of 1903, which crashed despite its apparent airworthiness. But it was the Wright brothers who prevailed that same year, and it wasn't long after their first successful flight that heavier-than-air travel became an everyday reality, from the sea as well as from land. The development of the seaplane not only reflected innovations of regular aircraft, but spurred key aviation innovations for all planes. Seaplanes were key participants in many of the flight competitions of the roaring twenties, and they played a formidable role in both world wars. Today, they continue to give travelers access to seemingly impossible-to-reach locales. This lavishly illustrated volume traces the development of the seaplane over the past century with first-hand accounts from pilots and passengers, and more than one hundred full-color and archival photographs. From Langley's Aerodrome to Curtiss' Flying Boat to the de Havilland Beaver so often used by bush pilots today, Seaplanes is an informative andengaging look at the planes that are as at home in the sea as they are in the sky.

The Aviation History

The 9th century Muslim Berber inventor, Abbas Ibn Firnas's glider is considered by John Harding to be the first attempt at heavier-than-air flight in aviation history.

The Aviation History

According to Aulus Gellius, Archytas, the Ancient Greek philosopher, mathematician, astronomer, statesman, and strategist, was reputed to have designed and built, around 400 BC, the first artificial, self-propelled flying device, a bird-shaped model propelled by a jet of what was probably steam, said to have actually flown some 200 metres. This machine, which its inventor called The Pigeon, may have been suspended on a wire or pivot for its flight. The 9th century Muslim Berber inventor, Abbas Ibn Firnas's glider is considered by John Harding to be the first attempt at heavier-than-air flight in aviation history. In 1010 AD an English monk, Eilmer of Malmesbury purportedly piloted a primitive gliding craft from the tower of Malmesbury Abbey. Eilmer was said to have flown over 200 yards (180 m) before landing, breaking both his legs. He later remarked that the only reason he did not fly further was because he forgot to give it a tail, and he was about to add one when his concerned Abbot forbade him any further experiments. Bartolomeu de Gusmao, Brazil and Portugal, an experimenter with early airship designs. In 1709 demonstrated a small airship model before the Portuguese court, but never succeeded with a full-scale model. Pilatre de Rozier, Paris, France, first trip by a human in a free-flying balloon (the Montgolfiere), built by Joseph-Michel and Jacques-Etienne Montgolfier, . 9 km covered in 25 minutes on October 15, 1783. (see Le Globe below for first unmanned flight, 2 months earlier) Professor Jacques Charles and Les Freres Robert, two French brothers, Anne-Jean and Nicolas-Louis, variously shared three milestones of pioneering flight: Le Globe, the first unmanned hydrogen gas balloon flew on 26 August 1783. On 1 December 1783 La Charliere piloted by Jacques Charles and Nicolas-Louis Robert made the first manned hydrogen balloon flight. In 1951, the Lockheed XFV-1 and the Convair XFY tailsitters were both designed around the Allison YT40 turboprop engine drivin

Catapult Aircraft

Thus was born a highly specialised type of aircraft. This book includes all the major designs that went to war in the First and Second World Wars and includes aircraft used by all the combatants.

Catapult Aircraft

During World War I, the navies of the opposing forces discovered the value of aerial reconnaissance and many experiments were made to allow larger warships to carry one or sometimes two aircraft aboard. In the early days these were float planes that were lowered by crane into the sea and then lifted back aboard upon their return. This was a lengthy affair and when a speedy departure was necessary, time was of the essence. A new system was devised so that a powerful catapult system and a short ramp could, with the added speed of the ship, get an aircraft airborne in a fraction of the time previously required. Thus was born a highly specialised type of aircraft. This book includes all the major designs that went to war in the First and Second World Wars and includes aircraft used by all the combatants. It looks at how the aircraft evolved and how the warships were modified to accommodate the aircraft and the catapult system. The use of these fixed-wing aircraft was abandoned when the invention of the helicopter was made in the early post WW II years.