American Literature and the Culture Wars

American Enterprise Institute, 44-45 American Indians (as term), 5on. See also
Native Americans American literature: boundaries of, 2, 13, 172, 180–83, 187;
breakdown of consensus about, 1–2, 6–7, 169–70; “culture wars” over, 1–5, 2 IO-
13; ...

American Literature and the Culture Wars

Gregory S. Jay boldly challenges the future of American literary studies. Why pursue the study and teaching of a distinctly American literature? What is the appropriate purpose and scope of such pursuits? Is the notion of a traditional canon of great books out of date? Where does American literature leave off and Mexican or Caribbean or Canadian or postcolonial literature begin? Are today's campus conflicts fueled more by economics or ideology? Jay addresses these questions and others relating to American literary studies to explain why this once arcane academic discipline found itself so often in the news during the culture wars of the 1990s. While asking some skeptical questions about new directions and practices, Jay argues forcefully in favor of opening the borders of American literary and cultural analysis. He relates the struggle for representation in literary theory to a larger cultural clash over the meaning and justice of representation, then shows how this struggle might expand both the contents and the teaching of American literature. In an account of the vexed legacy of the Declaration of Independence, he provides a historical context for the current quarrels over literature and politics. Prominent among these debates are those over multiculturalism, which Jay takes up in an essay on the impasses of identity politics. In closing, he considers how the field of comparative American cultural studies might be constructed.

Culture Wars

As cultural products, they have been powerful tools of communication among
different and sometimes warring social groups, contributing to and often
escalating the culture wars. Literature Postwar American literature began with a
wave of ...

Culture Wars

A collection of letters from a cross-section of Japanese citizens to a leading Japanese newspaper, relating their experiences and thoughts of the Pacific War.

Culture Wars in British Literature

Literar y critic P eter Kemp's lectures at Oxfo rd on “Post-War British Fiction”
offered a glimpse into how the end of the ... As an academic who h as spent two
decades r esearching and teaching contemporary British and American literature
at ...

Culture Wars in British Literature

The past century's culture wars that Britain has been consumed by, but that few North Americans seem aware of, have resulted in revised notions of Britishness and British literature. Yet literary anthologies remain anchored to an archaic Anglo-English interpretation of British literature. Conflicts have been played out over specific national vs. British identity (some residents prefer to describe themselves as being from Scotland, England, Wales, or Northern Ireland instead of Britain), in debates over immigration, race, ethnicity, class, and gender, and in arguments over British literature. These debates are strikingly detailed in such chapters as: "The Difficulty Defining 'Black British'," "British Jewish Writers" and "Xenophobia and the Booker Prize." Connections are also drawn between civil rights movements in the U.S. and UK. This generalist cultural study is a lively read and a fascinating glimpse into Britain's changing identity as reflected in 20th and 21st century British literature.

The Culture Wars

This book suggests otherwise, proposing that the Rudd Government's `me-too' strategy in taking power and the tendency since to remain loyal to the Howard agenda on major areas of public policy is illustrative of its need to retain the ...

The Culture Wars

Culture Wars: Australian and American politics in 21st Century argues that 'culture wars' attitudes and conflicts intrinsic to US politics for many decades are also deeply embedded characteristics of Australian political life in the 21st century. It suggests that during the Howard years (1996-2007) culture war antagonisms were forced to the political surface in Australia, albeit without the volatility and violence that sometimes accompanies disputes over religion, social authority, morality, multiculturalism, race, sexuality, education, immigration, feminism and national identity in the United States. With the demise of the Bush Administration (2000-2008) and the Howard Government some have proclaimed an end to the culture wars. This book suggests otherwise, proposing that the Rudd Government's 'me-too' strategy in taking power and the tendency since to remain loyal to the Howard agenda on major areas of public policy is illustrative of its need to retain the support of its socially conservative working class constituency and many of 'Howards battlers' returning to the ALP after the Keating years. This, it argues, will create increasing cultural tensions with its more progressivist sectors. The authors maintain that this tension is not necessarily a negative for Australian politics because it will help further ventilate culture war disputes within Australian society and democratise debates which have been largely the province of educated elites. The book seeks to further this democratisation process and engage the culture wars in broader terms than is anywhere else available in the literature. It provides a historical and intellectual framework for understanding the contemporary culture wars, before traversing some of its many battlegrounds, on foreign policy and national identity, 'the struggle for God', 'family values', immigration, the History Wars and the (Australian) 'Bogan' factor among others.

How White Men Won the Culture Wars

But he maintained that the war novelist had no home in American literature, that
critics looked down on him, O'Brien, and other Vietnam vets for reminding them of
a war that they wished to forget. Heinemann may have known more than he let ...

How White Men Won the Culture Wars

Reuniting white America after Vietnam. "If war among the whites brought peace and liberty to the blacks," Frederick Douglass asked in 1875, peering into the nation's future, "what will peace among the whites bring?" The answer then and now, after the Civil War and civil rights, is a white reunion disguised as a veterans' reunion. How White Men Won the Culture Wars shows how a broad contingent of white men--conservative and liberal, hawk and dove, vet and non-vet--transformed the Vietnam War into a staging ground for a post-civil rights white racial reconciliation. Conservatives could celebrate white vets as deracinated embodiments of the nation. Liberals could treat them as minoritized heroes whose voices must be heard. Erasing Americans of color, Southeast Asians, and women from the war, white men argued that they had suffered and deserved more. The war became a vehicle for claiming entitlements and grievances after civil rights and feminism, in an age of color blindness and multiculturalism. From the POW/MIA and veterans' mental health movements to Rambo and "Born in the U.S.A.," white men remade their racial identities in the image of the Vietnam vet. No one wins in a culture war--except, Joseph Darda argues, white men dressed in army green.

Transnational National and Personal Voices

In American Literature and the Culture Wars , Gregory Jay advocates considering
the effects of the blurring of cultural boundaries ( for instance the cross - border
influence of the Virgin of Guadalupe in Hispanic writing ) on what is conceived to
 ...

Transnational  National  and Personal Voices

"The growing heterogeneity of Asian American and Asian diasporic voices has also given rise to variegated theoretical approaches to these literatures. This book attempts to encompass both the increasing awareness of diasporic and transnational issues, and more ""traditional"" analyses of Asian American culture and literature. Thus, the articles in this collection range from investigations into the politics of literary and cinematic representation, to ""digging"" into the past through ""literary archeology"", or analyzing how ""consequential"" bodies can be in recent literature by Asian American and Asian diasporic women writers. The book closes with an interview with critic and writer Shirley Lim, where she insightfully deals with these ""transnational, national, and personal"" issues. Elisabetta Marino is Assistant Professor of English literature at the University of Rome ""Tor Vergata"". Her main fields of interest are Asian American and Asian British literature, children's literature, Italian American literature. Begoña Simal is Assistant Professor of English literature at the Universidade da Coruña, Spain. She has published critical work on both Asian American literature and comparative ""cross-ethnic"" studies. "

Loose Canons

Examines multiculturism in American literature and the cultural diversity found in the American classroom.

Loose Canons

Multiculturalism has been the subject of cover stories in Time and Newsweek and other newspapers and magazines around America. A leading literary and cultural critic, Gates says that the society we have made simply won't survive without the values of tolerance, and cultural tolerance comes to nothing without cultural understanding.

American Literature and Culture in an Age of Cold War

WarS. (iv,. v,. and. vi). and. the. advent. of. reaganism. AlAn. nAdel. far, far away
that, despite its extraterrestrial (that is, ... in the 1960s of the American Western,
which at one time was the most widespread genre in American popular culture, ...

American Literature and Culture in an Age of Cold War

The time is right for a critical reassessment of Cold War culture both because its full cultural impact remains unprocessed and because some of the chief paradigms for understanding that culture confuse rather than clarify. A collection of the work of some of the best cultural critics writing about the period, American Literature and Culture in an Age of Cold War reveals a broad range of ways that American cultural production from the late 1940s to the present might be understood in relation to the Cold War. Critically engaging the reigning paradigms that equate postwar U.S. culture with containment culture, the authors present suggestive revisionist claims. Their essays draw on a literary archive—including the works of John Updike, Joan Didion, Richard E. Kim, Allen Ginsberg, Edwin Denby, Alice Childress, Frank Herbert, and others—strikingly different from the one typically presented in accounts of the period. Likewise, the authors describe phenomena—such as the FBI’s surveillance of writers (especially African Americans), biopolitics, development theory, struggles over the centralization and decentralization of government, and the cultural work of Reaganism—that open up new contexts for discussing postwar culture. Extending the timeline and expanding the geographic scope of Cold War culture, this book reveals both the literature and the culture of the time to be more dynamic and complex than has been generally supposed.

Frederick Douglass and Herman Melville

Subject of Literary History (1990) and American Literature and the Culture Wars (
1997). His recent essays on race and American culture have appeared in
Cinema Journal, MELUS, and American Quarterly. CAROLYN L. KARCHER is
the ...

Frederick Douglass and Herman Melville

Frederick Douglass (1818-1895) and Herman Melville (1819-1891) addressed in their writings a range of issues that continue to resonate in American culture: the reach and limits of democracy; the nature of freedom; the roles of race, gender, and sexuality; and the place of the United States in the world. Yet they are rarely discussed together, perhaps because of their differences in race and social position. Douglass escaped from slavery and tied his well-received nonfiction writing to political activism, becoming a figure of international prominence. Melville was the grandson of Revolutionary War heroes and addressed urgent issues through fiction and poetry, laboring in increasing obscurity. In eighteen original essays, the contributors to this collection explore the convergences and divergences of these two extraordinary literary lives. Developing new perspectives on literature, biography, race, gender, and politics, this volume ultimately raises questions that help rewrite the color line in nineteenth-century studies. Contributors: Elizabeth Barnes, College of William and Mary Hester Blum, The Pennsylvania State University Russ Castronovo, University of Wisconsin-Madison John Ernest, West Virginia University William Gleason, Princeton University Gregory Jay, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee Carolyn L. Karcher, Washington, D.C. Rodrigo Lazo, University of California, Irvine Maurice S. Lee, Boston University Robert S. Levine, University of Maryland, College Park Steven Mailloux, University of California, Irvine Dana D. Nelson, Vanderbilt University Samuel Otter, University of California, Berkeley John Stauffer, Harvard University Sterling Stuckey, University of California, Riverside Eric J. Sundquist, University of California, Los Angeles Elisa Tamarkin, University of California, Irvine Susan M. Ryan, University of Louisville David Van Leer, University of California, Davis Maurice Wallace, Duke University Robert K. Wallace, Northern Kentucky University Kenneth W. Warren, University of Chicago

Beyond the Culture Wars

Argues that conflicts over education today afford a positive change in higher education rather than a downfall, and speaks out against liberal complacency

Beyond the Culture Wars

Argues that conflicts over education today afford a positive change in higher education rather than a downfall, and speaks out against liberal complacency

A Concise Companion to Postwar American Literature and Culture

Pat C. Hoy II The literature of war holds a mirror to our bestiality, alerts us to our
most primitive urges, warns us of the inextricable link between hubris and
destructiveness – shows us clearly that we pay an enormous price for who we
really are.

A Concise Companion to Postwar American Literature and Culture

This Concise Companion is a guide to the creative output of the United States in the postwar period, in its diverse energies, shapes and forms. Embraces diversity, covering Vietnam literature, gay and lesbian literature, American Jewish fiction, Italian American literature, Irish American writing, emergent ethnic literatures, African American writing, jazz, film, drama and more. Shows how different genres and approaches opened up creative possibilities and interacted in the postwar period. Portrays the postwar United States split by differences of wealth and position, by ethnicity and race, and by agendas of left and right, but united in the intensity of its creative drive.

Nationalism Marxism and African American Literature Between the Wars

Unashamed of their race and culture, his black contributors stand as ideal
representatives of the "New Negro," a postwar ... literature continue to portray the
movement as one devoted to issues of racial expression, black pride, and
American ...

Nationalism  Marxism  and African American Literature Between the Wars

During and after the Harlem Renaissance, two intellectual forces --nationalism and Marxism--clashed and changed the future of African American writing. Current literary thinking says that writers with nationalist leanings wrote the most relevant fiction, poetry, and prose of the day. Nationalism, Marxism, and African American Literature Between the Wars: A New Pandora's Box challenges that notion. It boldly proposes that such writers as A. Philip Randolph, Langston Hughes, and Richard Wright, who often saw the world in terms of class struggle, did more to advance the anti-racist politics of African American letters than writers such as Countee Cullen, Jessie Redmon Fauset, Alain Locke, and Marcus Garvey, who remained enmeshed in nationalist and racialist discourse. Evaluating the great impact of Marxism and nationalism on black authors from the Harlem Renaissance and the Depression era, Anthony Dawahare argues that the spread of nationalist ideologies and movements between the world wars did guide legitimate political desires of black writers for a world without racism. But the nationalist channels of political and cultural resistance did not address the capitalist foundation of modern racial discrimination. During the period known as the "Red Decade" (1929-1941), black writers developed some of the sharpest critiques of the capitalist world and thus anticipated contemporary scholarship on the intellectual and political hazards of nationalism for the working class. As it examines the progression of the Great Depression, the book focuses on the shift of black writers to the Communist Left, including analyses of the Communists' position on the "Negro Question," the radical poetry of Langston Hughes, and the writings of Richard Wright.

Narrating Class in American Fiction

Narrating Class in America Fiction is about class as discourse, how class is
represented in American fiction in the ... Desire (1991); John Carlos Rowe's At
Emerson's Tomb (1997); Gregory S. Jay's American Literature and Culture Wars (
1997); ...

Narrating Class in American Fiction

Focusing on American fiction from 1850-1940, Narrating Class in American Fiction offers close readings in the context of literary and political history to detail the uneasy attention American authors gave to class in their production of social identities.

Feeling Global

... “If Oxfam Ran the World,” 18. David Rieff, “Multiculturalism's Silent Partner,”
Harpers (August 1993), 62–72, quoted in Gregory S. Jay, American Literature
and the Culture Wars (Ithaca and London: Cornell University Press, 1997), 33–34
.

Feeling Global

Is global culture merely a pale and sinister reflection of capitalist globalization? Bruce Robbins responds to this and other questions in Feeling Global, a crucial document on nationalism, culturalism, and the role of intellectuals in the age of globalization. Building on his previous work, Robbins here takes up the question of the status of international human rights. Robbins' conception of internationalism is driven not only by the imperatives of global human rights policy, but by an understanding of transnational cultures, thus linking practical policymaking to cultural politics at the expense of neither. Robbins' cultural criticism, in other words, affords us much more than an understanding of how culture "shapes our lives." Instead, Robbins shows, particularly in his discussions of Martha Nussbaum, Richard Rorty, Susan Sontag, Michael Walzer and others, how "culture" itself has become a term that blocks—for commentators on both the right and the left—serious engagement with the contemporary cosmopolitan ideal of a nonuniversalist discourse of human rights. Rescuing "cosmopolitanism" itself from its connotations of leisured individuals loyal to no one and willing to sample all cultures at will, Feeling Global presents a compelling way to think about the ethical obligations of intellectuals at a time when their place in the new world order is profoundly uncertain.

American Blood

The Ends of the Family in American Literature, 1850-1900 Holly Jackson ... Betsy
Erkkila, Mixed Bloods and Other Crosses: Rethinking American Literature from
the Revolution to the Culture Wars (Philadelphia: U of Pennsylvania P, 2005), 2,
 ...

American Blood

The conventional view of the family in the nineteenth-century novel holds that it venerated the traditional domestic unit as a model of national belonging. Contesting this interpretation, American Blood argues that many authors of the period challenged preconceptions of the family and portrayed it as a detriment to true democracy and, by extension, the political enterprise of the United States. Relying on works by Harriet Beecher Stowe, Nathaniel Hawthorne, William Wells Brown, Pauline Hopkins, and others, Holly Jackson reveals family portraits that are claustrophobic, antidemocratic, and even unnatural. The novels examined here welcome, in Jackson's reading, the decline of the family and the exclusionary white-privileging American social order that it supported. Embracing and imagining this decline, the novels examined here incorporate and celebrate the very practices that mainstream Americans felt were the most dangerous to the family as an institution-interracial sex, doomed marriages, homosexuality, and the willful rejection of reproduction. In addition to historicized readings, the monograph also highlights how formal narrative characteristics served to heighten their anti-familial message: according to Jackson, the false starts, interpolated plots, and narrative dead-ends prominent in novels like The House of the Seven Gables and Dred are formal iterations of the books' interest in disrupting the family as a privileged ideological site. In sum, American Blood offers a much-needed corrective that will generate fresh insights into nineteenth-century literature and culture.

Marked Men

Race, Rape, and Lynching: The Red Record of American Literature, 1890–1912.
... “The Historical and the Hysterical: Melodrama, War, and Masculinity in Dead
Poets Society.” In Pat ... America Now: The Anthropology of a Changing Culture.

Marked Men

White men still hold most of the political and economic cards in the United States; yet stories about wounded and traumatized men dominate popular culture. Why are white men jumping on the victim bandwagon? Examining novels by Philip Roth, John Updike, James Dickey, John Irving, and Pat Conroy and such films as Deliverance, Misery, and Dead Poets Society—as well as other writings, including The Closing of the American Mind—Sally Robinson argues that white men are tempted by the possibilities of pain and the surprisingly pleasurable tensions that come from living in crisis.

Bearing Witness to African American Literature

... African American Literature: Validating and Valorizing Its Authority, Authenticity
, and Agency collects twenty-three of Bernard W. Bell's lectures and essays that
were first presented between 1968 and 2008. From his role in the culture wars as
 ...

Bearing Witness to African American Literature

An interdisciplinary, code-switching, critical collection by revisionist African American scholar and activist Bernard W. Bell.

Culture Wars

... Polish Catholic fami the history of World War II in Pohis own family of 100
members , lies by Uniate Ukrainians allied land . ... nearly as book Poland's
Holocaust by professor tims in Ukraine , Byelorussia , or the much in American
literature .

Culture Wars


The Cambridge History of American Literature Volume 8 Poetry and Criticism 1940 1995

The debates within and around it , sometimes referred to as " the canon wars ” or
“ the culture wars , ” have expressed in various ways the identity conflict not only
of our academic discipline but of the contemporary American society and culture
 ...

The Cambridge History of American Literature  Volume 8  Poetry and Criticism  1940 1995

Discusses the social, cultural, intellectual, and aesthetic aspects of American literature

The War on Terror and American Popular Culture

THEIR HISTORY, AMERICANS HAVE MADE THE REPRESENTA- tion of war
and warriors central to their literary and ... Such a preoccupation has not escaped
the notice of some of the most astute critics of American literature and culture.

The War on Terror and American Popular Culture

The War on Terror and American Popular Culture is a collection of original essays by academics and researchers from around the world that examines the complex interrelation between the Bush administration's "War on Terror" and American popular culture. Written by experts in the fields of literature, film, and cultural studies, this book examines in detail how popular culture reflects concerns and anxieties about the September 11 attacks and the war those attacks generated, how it interrogates the individual and collective impacts that war has wrought, how it might challenge or critique current policy, and how it might reinforce or endorse the war and its sociopolitical paradigms.