Demon Possession in Elizabethan England

published as Witches , Devils , and Doctors in the Renaissance , edited by George Mora ( Binghamton , New York ... The discussion of religious zealotry is adapted from Kathleen R. Sands , An Elizabethan Lawyer's Possession by the Devil ...

Demon Possession in Elizabethan England

Presents a vivid account of eleven cases diagnosed as demon possession in Elizabethan England, including the social, psychological, and theological assumptions that contributed to this phenomenon.

An Elizabethan Lawyer s Possession by the Devil

Sands challenges the prevailing notion that cases of early modern English demon possession occurred only among the socially impotent.

An Elizabethan Lawyer s Possession by the Devil

During April 1574, an aspiring London barrister named Robert Brigges was possessed by Satan. For three weeks, Brigges shouted, raged, and sobbed; suffered from sensory deprivations; and engaged in impassioned disputes with his invisible adversary. Although Brigges's case was considered significant in its time, it is virtually unknown today, with modern scholars rarely mentioning and never analyzing it. The case, however, is very unusual--perhaps unique among English cases--in its first-person, spontaneous, highly detailed documentation of the afflicted person's experience and in its sociocultural details. Sands challenges the prevailing notion that cases of early modern English demon possession occurred only among the socially impotent. The manuscript sources of this episode (published here for the first time) bombard the reader with an accretion of detail that is never connected to any broad assertion of what really happened, never connected to any larger historical significance. It is this connection that Sands's study aims to establish through an analysis of the cultural context of Brigges's experience. The case affords us a rare glimpse into the dark, private, unedited side of an intelligent, articulate, educated, early modern mind. A serious attempt to understand the workings of that mind requires us to understand and accept (for the purposes of analysis) the concepts that furnish it. Only through this approach can we hope to bridge the cultural gap between that mind and ours--thus experiencing, even if only momentarily, the common humanity of present and past.

The English Exorcist

Kathleen R. Sands, An Elizabethan Lawyer's Possession by the Devil: The Story of Robert Brigges (Westport, Conn: Praeger, 2002), 25. 121. Master Brigges Temptation (1574), British Library, Harley MS 590, sig. H47v-8r. 122.

The English Exorcist

In 1598, the English clergyman John Darrell was brought before the High Commission at Lambeth Palace to face charges of fraud and counterfeiting. The ecclesiastical authorities alleged that he had "taught 4. to counterfeite" demonic possession over a ten-year period, fashioning himself into a miracle worker. Coming to the attention of the public through his dramatic and successful role as an exorcist in the late sixteenth century, Darrell became a symbol of Puritan spirituality and the subject of fierce ecclesiastical persecution. The High Commission of John Darrell became a flashpoint for theological and demonological debate, functioning as a catalyst for spiritual reform in the early seventeenth-century English Church. John Darrell has long been maligned by scholars; a historiographical perception that this book challenges. The English Exorcist is the first study to provide an in-depth scholarly treatment of Darrell’s exorcism ministry and his demonology. It shines new light on the corpus of theological treatises that emerged from the Darrell Controversy, thereby illustrating the profound impact of Darrell’s exorcism ministry on early modern Reformed English Protestant demonology. The book establishes an intellectual biography of this figure and sketches out the full compelling story of the Darrell Controversy.

The Devil Within

Sands, Kathleen R. Demon Possession in Elizabethan England Westport, Conn., 2004. ——. An Elizabethan Lawyer's Possession by the Devil: The Story of Robert B ri gges. New York, 2002. Sauzet, Robert. 'Sorcellerie et possession en ...

The Devil Within

A fascinating, wide-ranging survey examines the history of possession and exorcism through the ages.

Witchcraft and Masculinities in Early Modern Europe

K. R. Sands, An Elizabethan Lawyer's Possession by the Devil: The Story of Robert Brigges (Westport, 2002), 76; See also idem, Demon Possession in Elizabethan England (Westport, 2004), 57–74. On Christoph Haizmann, see H. C. E. ...

Witchcraft and Masculinities in Early Modern Europe

Men – as accused witches, witch-hunters, werewolves and the demonically possessed – are the focus of analysis in this collection of essays by leading scholars of early modern European witchcraft. The gendering of witch persecution and witchcraft belief is explored through original case-studies from England, Scotland, Italy, Germany and France.

Bewitched and Bedeviled

For more information, see Bernard, Certainty of the Worlds, 209, and Kathleen R. Sand's An Elizabethan Lawyer's Possession by the Devil: The Story of Robert Brigges (Westport, CT: Praeger, 2002), 27. Hannah Allen, Satan, His Methods and ...

Bewitched and Bedeviled

Narratives of possession have survived in early English medical and philosophical treatises. Using ideas derived from cognitive science, this study moves through the stages of possession and exorcism to describe how the social, religious, and medical were internalized to create the varied manifestations of demon possession in early modern England.

Gothic Animals

Sands, Kathleen R. 2002. An Elizabethan Lawyer's Possession by the Devil: The Story of Robert Brigges. Westport, CT: Praeger. ———. 2004. Demon Possession in Elizabethan England. Westport, CT: Praeger. Stevenson, Robert Louis. 1886/1987.

Gothic Animals

This book begins with the assumption that the presence of non-human creatures causes an always-already uncanny rift in human assumptions about reality. Exploring the dark side of animal nature and the ‘otherness’ of animals as viewed by humans, and employing cutting-edge theory on non-human animals, eco-criticism, literary and cultural theory, this book takes the Gothic genre into new territory. After the dissemination of Darwin’s theories of evolution, nineteenth-century fiction quickly picked up on the idea of the ‘animal within’. Here, the fear explored was of an unruly, defiant, degenerate and entirely amoral animality lying (mostly) dormant within all of us. However, non-humans and humans have other sorts of encounters, too, and even before Darwin, humans have often had an uneasy relationship with animals, which, as Donna Haraway puts it, have a way of ‘looking back’ at us. In this book, the focus is not on the ‘animal within’ but rather on the animal ‘with-out’: other and entirely incomprehensible.

Mixed Motions

S In An Elizabethan Lawyer's Possession by the Devil , Elizabeth Sands recounts the similar paralysis of Robert Brigges , who suffers bouts of complete sensory incapacitation under Satan's control . Sands interprets this element of ...

Mixed Motions


The Devils of Loudun

CHAPTER V ND so Grandier was accused of sorcery and the Ursulines were possessed by devils. ... Sir Edward Coke, the greatest English lawyer of the late Elizabethan and Jacobean age, defined a witch as "a person who hath conference with ...

The Devils of Loudun

A gripping biography by the author of Brave New World In 1634 Urbain Grandier, a handsome and dissolute priest of the parish of Loudun was tried, tortured and burnt at the stake. He had been found guilty of conspiring with the devil to seduce an entire convent of nuns. Grandier maintained his innocence to the end but four years after his death the nuns were still being subjected to exorcisms to free them from their demonic bondage. Huxley's vivid account of this bizarre tale of religious and sexual obsession transforms our understanding of the medieval world.

Elizabethan Demonology

An Essay in Illustration of the Belief in the Existence of Devils, and the Powers Possessed by Them, ... Tis a spirit : sometime ' t appears like a lord ; sometime like a lawyer ; sometime like a philosopher , with two stones more than ...

Elizabethan Demonology


Choice

... Kathleen R. Demon possession in Elizabethan England . Praeger , 2004. 225p bibl index afp ISBN 027598169X , $ 44.95 Sands ( Temple Univ . , An Elizabethan Lawyer's Possession by the Devil , 2002 ) has produced a highly readable ...

Choice


Possession Puritanism and Print

Darrell, Harsnett, Shakespeare and the Elizabethan Exorcism Controversy Marion Gibson. their inability to be taken seriously by the supposedly sophisticated modern audience. As Satan points out, the Vice might have been acceptable in ...

Possession  Puritanism and Print

Tells a story of injustice and passionate resistance to religious persecution in the last years of Queen Elizabeth's reign. Through an analysis of a sensational series of demonic possessions and exorcisms, this book highlights the existence of controversies in print in the late Elizabethan period of the kind that would one day lead to civil war.

American Book Publishing Record

393.30932 E - health business and transactional law . ... 346.730322 An Elizabethan lawyer's possession by the devil . 133.426092 Elizabeth's song ( Wenberg ) JUV Elizabeti's school ( Stuve - Bodeen ) JUV Elmer McCurdy .

American Book Publishing Record


Jacobean Public Theatre

By the same token, when the Husband of A Yorkshire Tragedy abuses his power by destroying his family, there is a strong suggestion that he is possessed by a devil. Patriotism is an equally fundamental value. In The Honest Lawyer the ...

Jacobean Public Theatre

Jacobean Public Theatre recovers for the modern reader the acting, production and performance values of the public theatre of Jacobean London. It relates this drama to the popular culutre of the day and concludes with a close study of four important plays, including King Lear, which emerge in an unexpected light as the products of popular tradition.

Sidelights on Elizabethan Drama

Forobosco observes: This is somewhat difficult And will ask some conference with the devil. Compare A Cure for a Cuckold, I. i (iv. ... The last expression, or one that closely resembles it, is to be found in The Devil's Law Case.

Sidelights on Elizabethan Drama

First Published in 1966. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.

Elizabethan Literature and the Law of Fraudulent Conveyance

Yet there was an element of what Kempin calls a “pious fraud,” when eventually lawyers found a way to convert the estate in tail ... in possession as a tenant in fee tail and desired to convey a fee to B. B would sue him for the land, ...

Elizabethan Literature and the Law of Fraudulent Conveyance

This book investigates the origins, impact, and outcome of the Elizabethan obsession with fraudulent conveyancing, the part of debtor-creditor law that determines when a court can void a transfer of assets. Focusing on the years between the passage of a key statute in 1571 and the court case that clarified the statute in 1601, Charles Ross convincingly argues that what might seem a minor matter in the law was in fact part of a wide-spread cultural practice. The legal and literary responses to fraudulent conveyancing expose ethical, practical, and jurisprudential contradictions in sixteenth-century English, as well as modern, society. At least in English Common Law, debt was more pervasive than sex. Ross brings to this discussion a dazzling knowledge of early modern legal practice that takes the conversation out of the universities and Inns of Court and brings it into the early modern courtroom, the site where it had most relevance to Renaissance poets and playwrights. Ross here examines how during the thirty years in which the law developed, Sidney, Spenser, and Shakespeare wrote works that reflect the moral ambiguity of fraudulent conveyancing, which was practiced by unscrupulous debtors but also by those unfairly oppressed by power. The book starts by showing that the language and plot of Shakespeare's Merry Wives of Windsor continually refers to this cultural practice that English society came to grips with during the period 1571-1601. The second chapter looks at the social, political, and economic climate in which Parliament in 1571 passed 13 Eliz. 5, and argues that the law, which may have been used to oppress Catholics, was probably passed to promote business. The Sidney chapter shows that Henry Sidney, as governor of Ireland (a site of religious oppression), and his son Philip were, surprisingly, on the side of the fraudulent conveyors, both in practice and imaginatively (Sidney's Arcadia is the first of several works to associate fraudulent conveyancing with the abduction of women). The fourth chapter shows that Edmund Spenser, who as an official in Ireland rails against fraudulent conveyors, nonetheless includes a balanced assessment of several forms of the practice in The Faerie Queene. Chapter five shows how Sir Edward Coke's use of narrative in Twyne's Case (1601) helped settle the issue of intentionality left open by the parliamentary statute. The final chapter reveals how the penalty clause of the Elizabethan law accounts for the punishment Portia imposes on Shylock at the end of The Merchant of Venice. The real strength of the book lies in Ross's provocative readings of individual cases, which will be of great use to literary critics wrestling with the applications of legal theory to the interpretation of individual texts. This study connects a major development in the law to the literature of the period, one that makes a contribution not only to the law but also to literary studies and political and social history.

Witchcraft and Hysteria in Elizabethan London

... to a diabolical compact, and it tended to present witchcraft as a religious offence, a kind of devil- worship. ... 80 And yet despite the weight of learned opinion in favour of witchcraft and possession, their identification and ...

Witchcraft and Hysteria in Elizabethan London

Witchcraft was at its height in Elizabethan London. Edward Jorden showed that hysteria and not demons lay behind the witch-craze. Edward Jorden's Briefe Discourse of a Disease Called the Suffocation of the Mother (1603) is said to have reclaimed the demoniacally possessed for medicine and to have introduced the concept of hysteria into English psychiatry. The aim of this book is to reassess the reasons why Jorden wrote his famous pamphlet and to set it in its actual historical context. This book brings Jorden's pamphlet together with two works by Jorden's adversaries, John Swann's A True and Breife Report of Mary Glovers Vexation and Stephen Bradwell's `Mary Glovers late Woeful Case', which has never before been published. Both of these concern the incident that provoked Jorden's Briefe Discourse, and they show that his pamphlet was in fact prompted by a bitter religious and political controversy over the case. Michael MacDonald, in his introduction provides a fresh and realistic analysis of the politics of credulity and scepticism in early modern England and Jorden's part in them.

A Critical Edition of Ferdinando Parkhurst s Ignoramus The Academical Lawyer

Another good allusion to this idea may be found in Marston's The Malcontent (I,212): "Phew! the devil: let him possess thee; ... with Palingenius' Zodiacus Witae which was a third form text in the Elizabethan grammar school curriculum.

A Critical Edition of Ferdinando Parkhurst s Ignoramus  The Academical Lawyer

Published in 1987: The author translated the Ignoramous which is a Latin play into English.

The Elizabethan World

In defeat and humiliation, the Catholic Church was forced to find new strength and new spiritual resources with which to roll back the armies of the devil; but the means were those of a new generation, the tempered and flexible will of ...

The Elizabethan World

The Elizabethan World was a world remade. At the dawn of the sixteenth century, Europe was emerging from an age of ignorance and uncertainty. New lands were being discovered and old ones revitalized. People abandoned the ideals of medieval times to make startling advances in technology, science, and art. Here, award-winning historian Lacey Baldwin Smith vividly brings to life the story of Queen Elizabeth - perhaps the most influential sovereign in England's history - and the age she created. During her reign, Queen Elizabeth, last of the Tudor monarchs, presided over developments that still shape and inform our lives and culture today, including her patronage of William Shakespeare, the formation of the Church of England, victory over the Spanish Armada, even the execution of Mary Queen of Scots. Smith's keen eye for detail and sense of how those details have echoed through the centuries make this book essential reading for anyone who wants to understand how history works.