Ancient Historiography on War and Empire

In some cases, the balance shifts more towards the ‘literary’ and in others more towards the ‘historical’, but what all of the essays have in common is both a critical attention to the genre and context of history-writing in the ...

Ancient Historiography on War and Empire

In the ancient Greek-speaking world, writing about the past meant balancing the reporting of facts with shaping and guiding the political interests and behaviours of the present. Ancient Historiography on War and Empire shows the ways in which the literary genre of writing history developed to guide empires through their wars. Taking key events from the Achaemenid Persian, Athenian, Macedonian and Roman ‘empires’, the 17 essays collected here analyse the way events and the accounts of those events interact. Subjects include: how Greek historians assign nearly divine honours to the Persian King; the role of the tomb cult of Cyrus the Founder in historical narratives of conquest and empire from Herodotus to the Alexander historians; warfare and financial innovation in the age of Philip II and his son, Alexander the Great; the murders of Philip II, his last and seventh wife Kleopatra, and her guardian, Attalos; Alexander the Great’s combat use of eagle symbolism and divination; Plutarch’s juxtaposition of character in the Alexander-Caesar pairing as a commentary on political legitimacy and military prowess, and Roman Imperial historians using historical examples of good and bad rule to make meaningful challenges to current Roman authority. In some cases, the balance shifts more towards the ‘literary’ and in others more towards the ‘historical’, but what all of the essays have in common is both a critical attention to the genre and context of history-writing in the ancient world and its focus on war and empire.

Time and Narrative in Ancient Historiography

Offers case studies of the past embedded in the past as a window into the ancient historians' workshop.

Time and Narrative in Ancient Historiography

Offers case studies of the past embedded in the past as a window into the ancient historians' workshop.

Ancient Historiography and Its Contexts

Empire: Virgil. and. the. Historians. on. Civil. War. John Marincola That there was
a close connexion for the Romans between history and poetry can hardly be
denied. Historical epic in particular was dear to the Roman heart: beginning with
 ...

Ancient Historiography and Its Contexts

This is a collection of studies on ancient (especially Latin) poetry and historiography, concentrating especially on the impact of rhetoric on both genres, and on the importance of considering the literature to illuminate the historical Roman context and the historical context to illuminate the literature. It takes the form of a tribute to Tony Woodman, Gildersleeve Professor of Classics at the University of Virginia, for whom twenty-one scholars have contributed essays reflecting the interests and approaches that have typified Woodman's own work. The authors that he has continuously illuminated - especially Velleius, Horace, Virgil, Sallust, and Tacitus - figure particularly prominently.

Authority and Tradition in Ancient Historiography

Thucydides' footsteps, emphasising the unique greatness ofan event - a war,
usually — or the time period that they chose to write up. ... '5 Civil wars attendant
upon the deaths ofemperors provided fine fuel for the historians ofthe Empire.

Authority and Tradition in Ancient Historiography

A study of the various claims to authority made by the ancient Greek and Roman historians throughout their histories.

Ancient Historians

An accessible and concise overview of Greek and Roman history writing.

Ancient Historians

An accessible and concise overview of Greek and Roman history writing.

Roman Historiography

" Kurt A. Raaflaub, Brown University "This is a thought-provoking journey through the writing of history in Roman antiquity. Andreas Mehl masterfully unravels the fabric of historical traditions from the Annales to Zosimus.

Roman Historiography

Roman Historiography: An Introduction to its Basic Aspects and Development presents a comprehensive introduction to the development of Roman historical writings in both Greek and Latin, from the early annalists to Orosius and Procopius of Byzantium. Provides an accessible survey of every historical writer of significance in the Roman world Traces the growth of Christian historiography under the influence of its pagan adversaries Offers valuable insight into current scholarly trends on Roman historiography Includes a user-friendly bibliography, catalog of authors and editions, and index Selected by Choice as a 2013 Outstanding Academic Title

The Divine in Acts and in Ancient Historiography

The statement makes clear that God is the ultimate authority behind the Romans,
not only during the present war but also on a much broader scale—the “rod of
empire” is theirs. It also makes clear, however, that Rome's divine backing is not ...

The Divine in Acts and in Ancient Historiography

Scott Shauf compares the portrayal of the divine in Acts with portrayals of the divine in other ancient historiographical writings, the latter including Jewish and wider Greco-Roman historiographical traditions, exploring especially how the divine is represented as involved in history, the nature of divine retribution, the partiality or impartiality the divine toward different sets of people, and the portrayal of divine control over seemingly purely natural and human events. Acts is shown to be engaging historiographical traditions of the author's own day but also contributing unique historiographical perspectives.

Images and Insults

The Pyrrhic War attracted a great deal of attention in antiquity as the first contest between the burgeoning Roman Empire and the powers of the Hellenistic world.

Images and Insults

The Pyrrhic War attracted a great deal of attention in antiquity as the first contest between the burgeoning Roman Empire and the powers of the Hellenistic world. While blame for the initiation of hostilities fell squarely upon the polity of the Tarentines, scholars have long been wary of accounts relating how this conflict began. Three episodes set at Taras prove important for the construction both of Roman history and of narratives in antiquity. Approached as a case study of inventio in historiography, this monograph examines the aims and techniques of authors from Polybius to Zonaras in their depictions of the war's onset. No two of our sources offer the same version of events and new details emerge over the course of time. Analysis of the perception of injury, on the part of the Romans and the Tarentines, considers the implications of the �just' war on the writing of history.

The Historiography of Late Republican Civil War

The Historiography of Late Republican Civil War represents a close and coherent study of developments and discussions concerning the concept of civil war in the late republican and early imperial historiography of the late Republic.

The Historiography of Late Republican Civil War

The Historiography of Late Republican Civil War represents a close and coherent study of developments and discussions concerning the concept of civil war in the late republican and early imperial historiography of the late Republic.

Emperors and Historiography

This volume contains scholarly articles by professor Dani l den Hengst, in which structural and intertextual aspects of Roman historiographical texts are studied.

Emperors and Historiography

This volume contains scholarly articles by professor Dani l den Hengst, in which structural and intertextual aspects of Roman historiographical texts are studied. Special attention is given to the "Historia Augusta" and Ammianus Marcellinus' "Res Gestae," but also relevant texts by Cicero, Livy, Quintilian and Suetonius are discussed.

Latin Historians

The histories of Rome by Sallust, Livy, Tacitus and others shared the desire to demonstrate their practical applications and attempted to define the significance of the empire.

Latin Historians

The histories of Rome by Sallust, Livy, Tacitus and others shared the desire to demonstrate their practical applications and attempted to define the significance of the empire. Politics and military activity were the central subjects of these histories. Roman historians' claims to telling the truth probably meant they were denying bias rather than conforming to the modern tendency to be objective.

Alexander the Great

It seeks to relate some current views on the causes and objectives of war as
presented by ancient writers to the specific case of the Macedonian invasion of
Asia under Alexander . ' I do not wish to suggest that historiographical and
historical aspects can be entirely dissociated . ... Finley in his chapter on ' War
and empire ' ; and he then went on to suggest ( 1985b , 80 ; 81 ) that ' ancient
wars can normally ...

Alexander the Great

This exciting new volume includes a selection of the most significant and representative published articles and chapters about Alexander and covers all the main areas of debate and discussion in Alexander scholarship.

The Classical Foundations of Modern Historiography

The text is printed as the author left it. Sather Classical Lectures, 54 "The book is marvelously erudite, using the historiography of the ancient world to set off on am arch through the ages.

The Classical Foundations of Modern Historiography

Here, at last, are the long-awaited Sather Classical Lectures of the great historian Arnaldo Momigliano, In a masterly survey of the origins of ancient historiography, Momigliano captures those features of an ancient historian's work that not only gave it importance in its own day but also encouraged imitation and exploitation in later centuries. He reveals the extent to which Greek, Persian, and Jewish historians influenced the Western historiographic tradition, and then goes on to examine the first Roman historians and the emergence of national history. In the course of his exposition, he traces the development of antiquarian studies as distinctive branch of historical research from antiquity to the modern period, discusses the place of Tacitus in historical thought, and explores the way in which ecclesiastical historiography has developed a tradition of its own. All these lectures illustrate Momigliano's unrivaled ability to combine the study of classical texts and the history of classical scholarship. First delivered in 1962, the lectures were revised during the next fifteen years and then held for annotation that was never completed. They are now published from the author's manuscripts, collated and checked by Momigliano's literary executor, Anne Marie Meyer, of the Warburg Institute, with a foreword by Riccardo Di Donato, of the University of Pisa. The text is printed as the author left it. Sather Classical Lectures, 54

Historiography

In this pioneering work, Ernst Breisach presents an effective, well-organized, and concise account of the development of historiography in Western culture.

Historiography

In this pioneering work, Ernst Breisach presents an effective, well-organized, and concise account of the development of historiography in Western culture. Neither a handbook nor an encyclopedia, this up-to-date third edition narrates and interprets the development of historiography from its origins in Greek poetry to the present, with compelling sections on postmodernism, deconstructionism, African-American history, women’s history, microhistory, the Historikerstreit, cultural history, and more. The definitive look at the writing of history by a historian, Historiography provides key insights into some of the most important issues, debates and innovations in modern historiography. Praise for the first edition: “Breisach’s comprehensive coverage of the subject and his clear presentation of the issues and the complexity of an evolving discipline easily make his work the best of its kind.”—Lester D. Stephens, American Historical Review

Italian Unification

Italian Unification


War Peace and Empire

Amar - Su ' ena and the Historical Tradition ” , in : Ellis , Essay on Ancient Near
East , pp . 155 - 157 . Some Observations on Causes of War in Ancient
Historiography ” , in : A . Momigliano , Secondo Contributo alla Storia degli Studi
Classici ...

War  Peace  and Empire

This monograph aims to present the reasons for going to war as proclaimed in the Assyrian royal inscriptions. The investigation is based on the presumption that we can distill from the professes "casus belli" the basic religious and moral ideas as well as the political ideology of Assyrian kingship and empire. In addition, this study tries to determine the literary conventions employed in presenting the causes for war. This monograph is only the first part of a comprehensive and comparative study on "causus belli" in the royal inscriptions from the Ancient Near East.

Ancient Warfare A Very Short Introduction

... on this area, see M. J. Nicasie, Twilight of Empire: The Roman Army from the
Reign of Diocletian until the Battle of Adrianople (Amsterdam, 1998), p. ...
Chapter 4 See R. Sorabji, 'Take time to win the philosophical battle', The Times
Higher Education Supplement, 9 May 2003, p. 16. ... Also useful are A.
Momigliano, 'Some observations on causes of war in ancient historiography', in A
. Momigliano (ed.) ...

Ancient Warfare  A Very Short Introduction

Greek and Roman warfare differed from other cultures and was unlike any other forms of warfare before and after. The key difference is often held to be that the Greeks and Romans practised a 'Western Way of War', where the aim is an open, decisive battle, won by courage instilled in part by discipline. Harry Sidebottom looks at how and why this 'Western Way of War' was constructed and maintained by the Greeks and Romans, why this concept is so popular and prevalent today, and at whether or not this is an accurate interpretation. All aspects of ancient warfare are thoroughly examined - from philosophy and strategy to the technical skills needed to fight. He looks at war in the wider context - how wars could shape classical society, and how the individual's identity could be constructed by war, for example the Christian soldier fighting in God's name. He also explores the ways in which ancient society thought about conflict: Can a war be just? Why was siege warfare particularly bloody? What role did divine intervention play in the outcome of a battle? Taking fascinating examples from the Iliad, Tacitus, and the Persian Wars, Sidebottom uses arresting anecdotes and striking visual images to show that the any understanding of ancient war is an ongoing process of interpretation. ABOUT THE SERIES: The Very Short Introductions series from Oxford University Press contains hundreds of titles in almost every subject area. These pocket-sized books are the perfect way to get ahead in a new subject quickly. Our expert authors combine facts, analysis, perspective, new ideas, and enthusiasm to make interesting and challenging topics highly readable.

Appian s Roman History

We need to know him better. This collection of 15 new papers from a distinguished international team studies both what Appian had to say and how he said it.

Appian s Roman History

Appian of Alexandria lived in the early-to-mid second century AD, a time when the pax Romana flourished. His Roman History traced, through a series of ethnographic histories, the growth of Roman power throughout Italy and the Mediterranean World. But Appian also told the story of the civil wars which beset Rome from the time of Tiberius Gracchus to the death of Sextus Pompeius Magnus. The standing of his work in modern times is paradoxical. Consigned to the third rank by nineteenth-century historiographers, and poorly served by translators, Appian's Roman History profoundly shapes our knowledge of Republican Rome, its empire and its internal politics. We need to know him better. This collection of 15 new papers from a distinguished international team studies both what Appian had to say and how he said it. The papers engage in a dialogue about the value of Appian's text as a source of history, the relationship between that history and his own times, and the impact on his narrative of the author's own opinions - most notably that Rome enjoyed divinely-ordained good fortune. Some authors demonstrate that Appian's text (and even his mistakes) can yield significant new information, others re-open the question of Appian's use of source material in the light of recent studies showing him to be far more than a transmitter of other people's work.

The Persian War in Herodotus and Other Ancient Voices

'An exciting, highly informative and also enjoyable read: Shepherd writes with clarity and verve... this book should find it's way into the hands of all schools, universities and lovers of Herodotus.

The Persian War in Herodotus and Other Ancient Voices

Weaving together the accounts of the ancient historian Herodotus with other ancient sources, this is the engrossing story of the triumph of Greece over the mighty Persian Empire. The Persian War is the name generally given to the first two decades of the period of conflict between the Greeks and the Persians that began in 499 BC and ended around 450. The pivotal moment came in 479, when a massive Persian invasion force was defeated and driven out of mainland Greece and Europe, never to return. The victory of a few Greek city-states over the world's first superpower was an extraordinary military feat that secured the future of Western civilization. All modern accounts of the war as a whole, and of the best-known battles of Marathon, Thermopylae and Salamis, depend on the ancient sources, foremost amongst them Herodotus. Yet although these modern narratives generally include numerous references to the ancient authors, they quote little directly from them. This is the first book to bring together Herodotus' entire narrative and interweave it with other ancient voices alongside detailed commentary to present and clarify the original texts. The extracts from other ancient writers add value to Herodotus' narrative in various ways: some offer fresh analysis and credible extra detail; some contradict him interestingly; some provide background illumination; and some add drama and colour. All are woven into a compelling narrative tapestry that brings this immense clash of arms vividly to life. 'Distinguished military historian of the Persian Wars William Shepherd [...] shows himself to be also a most sensitive interpreter of those Wars' original historian Herodotus. With Shepherd as our guide and Herodotus by our side this key moment in West-East relations is given its full cultural and strategic due.' Paul Cartledge, A.G. Leventis Senior Research Fellow of Clare College, Cambridge

Experience and Teleology in Ancient Historiography

... more conducive to teleological design: wars, to take the most prominent
subject for historical monographs in Antiquity, ... the Roman Empire, as it has
been since Marcellinus, or even as the end ofAntiquity, it becomes a crucial
turning point.

Experience and Teleology in Ancient Historiography

The past is narrated in retrospect. Historians can either capitalize on the benefit of hindsight and give their narratives a strongly teleological design or they may try to render the past as it was experienced by historical agents and contemporaries. This book explores the fundamental tension between experience and teleology in major works of Greek and Roman historiography, biography and autobiography. The combination of theoretical reflections with close readings yields a new, often surprising assessment of the history of ancient historiography as well as a deeper understanding of such authors as Thucydides, Tacitus and Augustine. While much recent work has focused on how ancient historians use emplotment to generate historical meaning, Experience and Teleology in Ancient Historiography offers a new approach to narrative form as a mode of coming to grips with time.