And a Bottle of Rum

Traces the history of America from the perspective of ten different cocktails, discussing the role of rum in the New World, from the colonial period to the present day, in a colorful study that blends pop culture, historical trivia, travel, ...

And a Bottle of Rum

Traces the history of America from the perspective of ten different cocktails, discussing the role of rum in the New World, from the colonial period to the present day, in a colorful study that blends pop culture, historical trivia, travel, and food and libation lore. 25,000 first printing.

And a Bottle of Rum Revised and Updated

Complete with cocktail recipes for would-be epicurean time-travelers, this is history at its most intoxicating.

And a Bottle of Rum  Revised and Updated

Now revised, updated, and with new recipes, And a Bottle of Rum tells the raucously entertaining story of this most American of liquors From the grog sailors drank on the high seas in the 1700s to the mojitos of Havana bar hoppers, spirits and cocktail columnist Wayne Curtis offers a history of rum and the Americas alike, revealing that the homely spirit once distilled from the industrial waste of the booming sugar trade has managed to infiltrate every stratum of New World society. Curtis takes us from the taverns of the American colonies, where rum delivered both a cheap wallop and cash for the Revolution; to the plundering pirate ships off the coast of Central America; to the watering holes of pre-Castro Cuba; and to the kitsch-laden tiki bars of 1950s America. Here are sugar barons and their armies conquering the Caribbean, Paul Revere stopping for a nip during his famous ride, Prohibitionists marching against "demon rum," Hemingway fattening his liver with Havana daiquiris, and today's bartenders reviving old favorites like Planter's Punch. In an age of microbrewed beer and single-malt whiskeys, rum--once the swill of the common man--has found its way into the tasting rooms of the most discriminating drinkers. Complete with cocktail recipes for would-be epicurean time-travelers, this is history at its most intoxicating.

And a Bottle of Rum

A History of the New World in Ten Cocktails Wayne Curtis. made Myers's rum went on to label its as “Planter's Punch Rum.” words still emblazoned on some bottles today. The popularity of dark Jamaican rum was such that even distillers in ...

And a Bottle of Rum

Now revised, updated, and with new recipes, And a Bottle of Rum tells the raucously entertaining story of this most American of liquors From the grog sailors drank on the high seas in the 1700s to the mojitos of Havana bar hoppers, spirits and cocktail columnist Wayne Curtis offers a history of rum and the Americas alike, revealing that the homely spirit once distilled from the industrial waste of the booming sugar trade has managed to infiltrate every stratum of New World society. Curtis takes us from the taverns of the American colonies, where rum delivered both a cheap wallop and cash for the Revolution; to the plundering pirate ships off the coast of Central America; to the watering holes of pre-Castro Cuba; and to the kitsch-laden tiki bars of 1950s America. Here are sugar barons and their armies conquering the Caribbean, Paul Revere stopping for a nip during his famous ride, Prohibitionists marching against "demon rum," Hemingway fattening his liver with Havana daiquiris, and today's bartenders reviving old favorites like Planter's Punch. In an age of microbrewed beer and single-malt whiskeys, rum--once the swill of the common man--has found its way into the tasting rooms of the most discriminating drinkers. Complete with cocktail recipes for would-be epicurean time-travelers, this is history at its most intoxicating.

Spirits Cocktails of Upstate New York A History

“Almost overnight, rum found its way into every aspect of colonial life,” writes author Wayne Curtis in his 2006 book, And a Bottle of Rum: A History of the New World in Ten Cocktails. “A colonist would toss back a dram in the morning ...

Spirits   Cocktails of Upstate New York  A History

From the Hudson Valley to the Niagara River, Upstate New York has a long and grand history of spirits and cocktails. Early colonists distilled rum, and pioneering settlers made whiskey. In the 1800s, a fanciful story of a tavern keeper and a "cock's tail" took root along the Niagara River, and the earliest definition of the "cocktail" appeared in a Hudson Valley paper. The area is home to its share of spirited times and liquid legends, and the recent surge in modern distilleries and cocktail bars only bolsters that tradition. Author Don Cazentre serves up these tales of Upstate New York along with more than fifty historic and modern cocktail recipes.

Food and Drink in American History A Full Course Encyclopedia 3 Volumes

And a Bottle of Rum: A History of the New World in Ten Cocktails. New York: Crown, 2006. Foss, Richard. Rum: A Global History. London: Reaktion, 2012. Furnas, J. C. The Life and Times of the Late Demon Rum.

Food and Drink in American History  A  Full Course  Encyclopedia  3 Volumes

This three-volume encyclopedia on the history of American food and beverages covers topics ranging from early American Indian foods to mandatory nutrition information at fast food restaurants.

Midcentury Cocktails

History, Lore, and Recipes from America's Atomic Age Cecelia Tichi ... New York: New American Library, 2006. Baker, Trudy, and Rachel Jones. ... And a Bottle of Rum: A History of the New World in Ten Cocktails. 2006. Reprint.

Midcentury Cocktails

A delightful history of cocktails from the era of new interstate highways, sprouting suburbs, and atomic engineering America at midcentury was a nation on the move, taking to wings and wheels along the new interstate highways and in passenger jets that soared to thirty thousand feet. Anxieties rippled, but this new Atomic Age promised cheap power and future wonders, while the hallmark of the era was the pleasure of an evening imbibing cocktails in mixed company, a middle-class idea of sophisticated leisure. This new age, stretching from the post–World War II baby boom years through the presidency of General Dwight Eisenhower into the increasingly volatile mid-1960s, promised affordable homes for those who had never dreamed of owning property and an array of gleaming appliances to fill them. For many, this was America at its best—innovation, style, and the freedom to enjoy oneself—and the spirit of this time is reflected in the whimsical cocktails that rose to prominence: tiki drinks, Moscow mules, Sea Breezes, Pina Coladas, Pink Squirrels, and Sloe Gin Fizzes. Of course, not everyone was invited to the party. Though the drinks were getting sweeter, the racial divide was getting more bitter—Black Americans in search of a drink, entertainment, or a hotel room had to depend on the Green Book for advice on places where they would be welcome and safe. And the Cold War and Space Race proceeded ominously throughout this period, as technological advances alternately thrilled and terrified. The third installment in Cecelia Tichi’s tour of the cocktails enjoyed in various historical eras, Midcentury Cocktails brings a time of limitless possibilities to life though the cocktails created, named, and consumed.

The Oxford Companion to Spirits and Cocktails

... rum, and water. An old jingle of uncertain origin called out the proportions: “One of sour, two of sweet, three of strong, four of weak. ... And a Bottle of Rum: A History of the New World in Ten Cocktails. New York: Crown, 2006.

The Oxford Companion to Spirits and Cocktails

Anthropologists and historians have confirmed the central role alcohol has played in nearly every society since the dawn of human civilization, but it is only recently that it has been the subject of serious scholarly inquiry. The Oxford Companion to Spirits and Cocktails is the first major reference work to cover the subject from a global perspective, and provides an authoritative, enlightening, and entertaining overview of this third branch of the alcohol family. It will stand alongside the bestselling Companions to Wine and Beer, presenting an in-depth exploration of the world of spirits and cocktails in a groundbreaking synthesis. The Companion covers drinks, processes, and techniques from around the world as well as those in the US and Europe. It provides clear explanations of the different ways that spirits are produced, including fermentation, distillation, and ageing, alongside a wealth of new detail on the emergence of cocktails and cocktail bars, including entries on key cocktails and influential mixologists and cocktail bars. With entries ranging from Manhattan and mixology to sloe gin and stills, the Companion combines coverage of the range of spirit-based drinks around the world with clear explanations of production processes, and the history and culture of their consumption. It is the ultimate guide to understanding what is in your glass. The Companion is lavishly illustrated throughout, and appendices include a timeline of spirits and distillation and a guide to mixing drinks.

Killer High

A History of War in Six Drugs Peter Andreas. 16. Quoted in Gately, Drink, ... Quoted in Wayne Curtis, And a Bottle of Rum: A History of the New World in Ten Cocktails (New York: Three Rivers Press, 2006), 51. Note that Curtis questions ...

Killer High

Introduction: How drugs made war and war made drugs -- Drunk on the front -- Where there's smoke there's war -- Caffeinated conflict -- Opium, empire, and Geopolitics -- Speed warfare -- Cocaine wars -- Conclusion: The drugged battlefields of the 21st century .

The New Rum A Modern Guide to the Spirit of the Americas

Encyclopædia Britannica, Inc. December 13, 2016. https://www.britannica.com/topic/sugar-chemical-compound. Curtis, Wayne. And A Bottle of Rum: A History of the New World in Ten Cocktails. New York: Crown Publishers, 2006. ———.

The New Rum  A Modern Guide to the Spirit of the Americas

Nine countries, forty producers, and ten classic cocktails Rum, traditionally relegated to cloying cocktails or tropical- themed novelty drinks, is undergoing a global renaissance. In bars and distilleries across the world, rum is being defined as a dynamic, complex, and versatile drink. New to the scene of connoisseurship, rum is a spirit of possibilities, inviting imaginative bartenders and mixologists to leave their marks on this burgeoning movement. In The New Rum, award- winning drinks author Bryce T. Bauer charts the historical and cultural journey of the spirit of the Americas from its origins in the Caribbean, to its long- held status as a cheap vacation drink, to today’s inspiring craft revival. This rum-spiked travelogue also includes a producer- focused drinks guide, covering dozens of the world’s most innovative and iconic producers, making everything from Martinique rhum agricole to long-aged sippers from Barbados and the Dominican Republic.

Gilded Age Cocktails

And a Bottle of Rum: A History of the New World in Ten Cocktails. New York: Broadway, 2006. Day, Clarence, Jr. The Best of Clarence Day. New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1948. De Courcy, Anne. The Husband Hunters: American Heiresses Who ...

Gilded Age Cocktails

A delightful romp through America’s Golden Age of Cocktails The decades following the American Civil War burst with invention—they saw the dawn of the telephone, the motor car, electric lights, the airplane—but no innovation was more welcome than the beverage heralded as the “cocktail.” The Gilded Age, as it came to be known, was the Golden Age of Cocktails, giving birth to the classic Manhattan and martini that can be ordered at any bar to this day. Scores of whiskey drinks, cooled with ice chips or cubes that chimed against the glass, proved doubly pleasing when mixed, shaken, or stirred with special flavorings, juices, and fruits. The dazzling new drinks flourished coast to coast at sporting events, luncheons, and balls, on ocean liners and yachts, in barrooms, summer resorts, hotels, railroad train club cars, and private homes. From New York to San Francisco, celebrity bartenders rose to fame, inventing drinks for exclusive universities and exotic locales. Bartenders poured their liquid secrets for dancing girls and such industry tycoons as the newspaper mogul William Randolph Hearst and the railroad king “Commodore” Cornelius Vanderbilt. Cecelia Tichi offers a tour of the cocktail hours of the Gilded Age, in which industry, innovation, and progress all take a break to enjoy the signature beverage of the age. Gilded Age Cocktails reveals the fascinating history behind each drink as well as bartenders’ formerly secret recipes. Though the Gilded Age cocktail went “underground” during the Prohibition era, it launched the first of many generations whose palates thrilled to a panoply of artistically mixed drinks.

To Have and Have Another Revised Edition

A. E. Hotchner, Papa Hemingway (New York: Random House, 1966), 33–34. 59. Wayne Curtis, And a Bottle of Rum: A History of the New World in Ten Cocktails (New York: Crown, 2006), 200. 60. Letter to John Dos Passos, April 12, 1936, ...

To Have and Have Another Revised Edition

Ernest Hemingway is nearly as famous for his drinking as he is for his writing. Throughout his collected works, Papa's sensuous explorations of the delights of imbibing engaged both his characters and his readers. In To Have and Have Another: A Hemingway Cocktail Companion, Philip Greene, cocktail historian, spirits consultant, and cofounder of the Museum of the American Cocktail, offers us a view of Papa through the lens Papa himself preferred—the bottom of a glass. A bartender’s manual for Hemingway enthusiasts, this revised and expanded volume offers a unique take on Hemingway’s oeuvre that privileges the tastes, smells, and colors of the cocktails he enjoyed and the drinks he placed so prominently in his stories they were nearly characters themselves. To Have and Have Another delivers fascinating and lively background on the various drinks, their ingredients, their histories, and the characters—real and fictional—associated with them.

Glass and Gavel

Famous New Orleans Drinks and How to Mix 'Em. Gretna, LA: Pelican Books, 1937, 1972. Barr, Andrew. ... Review of Rum Punch and Revolution, by Peter Thompson. ... And a Bottle of Rum: A History of the New World in Ten Cocktails.

Glass and Gavel

Noted legal expert Nancy Maveety has written the first book devoted to alcohol in the nation’s highest court, The US Supreme Court. She shows that what the justices do and say about alcohol provides important lessons about their times, our times, and our “constitutional cocktail” of limited government power and individual rights.

Vintage Spirits and Forgotten Cocktails Prohibition Centennial Edition

-WAYNE CURTIS , AUTHOR OF AND A BOTTLE OF RUM : A HISTORY OF THE NEW WORLD IN TEN COCKTAILS " Ted Haigh's book is fun to read and have drinks when you're reading it and I had seven of them from the book before I wroted this and ...

Vintage Spirits and Forgotten Cocktails  Prohibition Centennial Edition

In this new, expanded edition of Vintage Spirits and Forgotten Cocktails—issued for the 100th Anniversary of National Prohibition—historian, expert, and drink aficionado Dr. Cocktail vastly widens his examination of 1920–1933, the thirteen-year period when women got the Vote, child labor was abolished and, ironically, saw the cocktail elevated, prolonged, and expanded, spreading this signature American drink form in tasty ripples around the world. All this, plus more drink recipes! Nothing is so desired as the thing denied. Prohibition made people want cocktails very, very badly. Because "synthetic" liquor was the easiest to make, it was also the easiest to get. Problematically, it tasted awful and wasn't exactly good for you either. Cocktails with their mélange of flavors were a made-to-order method for disguising the bad hooch. Along with 100+ rare and delicious authentic recipes gathered from old cocktail manuals and scraps of paper never published, this illustrated trip down mixology lane tells the fascinating origins of the cocktail and how it evolved over time, including its rising popularity during Prohibition. Vintage illustrations and advertisements, photos of old bottles and cocktail artifacts, and fascinating Prohibition-era photographs bring the tippling past back to vivid life. Recipes for rare treasures like The Fogcutter, Knickerbocker à la Monsieur, The Moscow Mule, and Satan’s Whiskers are each presented with: Historical background on its origin and cultural context Drink Notes that provide additional information on ingredients and tips for substitutions and variations Fascinating historical ephemera from Dr. Cocktail's personal collection This homage to the great bartenders of the past and the beverages they created also profiles some of the most influential cocktail pioneers of today. For anyone who enjoys an icy drink and an unforgettable tale, this is a must-have volume.

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Food and Drink in America

Conrad, Barnaby, III. The Martini: An Illustrated History of an American Classic. San Francisco: Chronicle Books, 1995. Curtis, Wayne. And a Bottle of Rum: A History of the New World in Ten Cocktails. New York: Crown Publishers, 2006.

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Food and Drink in America

Home cooks and gourmets, chefs and restaurateurs, epicures, and simple food lovers of all stripes will delight in this smorgasbord of the history and culture of food and drink. Professor of Culinary History Andrew Smith and nearly 200 authors bring together in 770 entries the scholarship on wide-ranging topics from airline and funeral food to fad diets and fast food; drinks like lemonade, Kool-Aid, and Tang; foodstuffs like Jell-O, Twinkies, and Spam; and Dagwood, hoagie, and Sloppy Joe sandwiches.

Drinking History

And a Bottle of Rum: A History of the New World in Ten Cocktails. New York: Crown, . DeGro , Dale. The Craft of the Cocktail. New York: Clarkson Potter, . Grimes, William. Straight Up or On the Rocks: The Story of the American Cocktail.

Drinking History

A companion to Andrew F. Smith’s critically acclaimed and popular Eating History: Thirty Turning Points in the Making of American Cuisine, this volume recounts the individuals, ingredients, corporations, controversies, and myriad events responsible for America’s diverse and complex beverage scene. Smith revisits the country’s major historical moments—colonization, the American Revolution, the Whiskey Rebellion, the temperance movement, Prohibition, and its repeal—and he tracks the growth of the American beverage industry throughout the world. The result is an intoxicating encounter with an often overlooked aspect of American culture and global influence. Americans have invented, adopted, modified, and commercialized tens of thousands of beverages—whether alcoholic or nonalcoholic, carbonated or caffeinated, warm or frozen, watery or thick, spicy or sweet. These include uncommon cocktails, varieties of coffee and milk, and such iconic creations as Welch’s Grape Juice, Coca-Cola, root beer, and Kool-Aid. Involved in their creation and promotion were entrepreneurs and environmentalists, bartenders and bottlers, politicians and lobbyists, organized and unorganized criminals, teetotalers and drunks, German and Italian immigrants, savvy advertisers and gullible consumers, prohibitionists and medical professionals, and everyday Americans in love with their brew. Smith weaves a wild history full of surprising stories and explanations for such classic slogans as “taxation with and without representation;” “the lips that touch wine will never touch mine;” and “rum, Romanism, and rebellion.” He reintroduces readers to Samuel Adams, Thomas Jefferson, George Washington, and the colorful John Chapman (Johnny Appleseed), and he rediscovers America’s vast literary and cultural engagement with beverages and their relationship to politics, identity, and health.

Rum The Manual

The Great Illusion: An Informal History of Prohibition. Garden City, New York: Doubleday, 1950. Ayala, César J. American Sugar Kingdom: The ... Curtis, Wayne. And a Bottle of Rum: A History of the New World in Ten Cocktails. New York: ...

Rum The Manual

Shortlisted for the Fortnum & Mason Drink Book award. This is a book about how to drink rum of all kinds. It's about classic rums and new-generation rums, about rhum agricole and about premium aged rums, about rums from all over the world. It's about rum enjoyed with cola and ginger beer. About the best rum for a classic daquiri. About rum cocktails that ooze style and personality. Above all, it's about enjoying your rum in ways you never thought possible. The premium rum market is growing at an astonishing rate. The mission of this book is to help drinkers appreciate this complex spirit, find the style they like and discover how this versatile spirit can best be enjoyed. It will help you to understand your rum - how it's produced (whether from molasses, cane syrup or cane juice) and whether it's dry, sweet, fresh or oaky. More than 100 different rums are featured and analysed, from rich, sweet mellow Guyana rums to the vegetal peppery rums of Martinique or Guadeloupe and contemporary spiced rums. Dave Broom provides a description and graded tasting notes for each brand, allowing you to create the perfect mix every time. Finally, a selection of classic and contemporary cocktails shows just how wonderfully versatile this spirit is.

A Bristol Rhode Island and Matanzas Cuba Slavery Connection

And a Bottle of Rum: A History of the New World in Ten Cocktails (New York: Crown Publishers, 2006). 17. Jane Landers, Atlantic Creoles in the Age of Revolutions (Harvard University Press, 2010), 208. 18. Laird W. Bergad, Cuban Rural ...

A Bristol  Rhode Island  and Matanzas  Cuba  Slavery Connection

In the early 19th century, Cuba emerged as the world’s largest producer of sugar and the United States its most important buyer. Barely documented today, there was a close commercial relationship between Cuba and the Rhode Island coastal town of Bristol. The citizens of Bristol were heavily involved in the slavery trade and owned sugarcane plantations in Cuba and also served as staff workers at these facilities. Available in print for the first time is a diary that sheds light on this connection. Mr. George Howe, Esquire (1791–1837), documented his tasks at a Bristolian-owned plantation called New Hope, which was owned by well-known Bristol merchant, slave trader, and US senator James DeWolf (1764–1837). Howe expressed mixed personal feelings about local slavery work practices. He felt lucky to be employed and was determined to do his job well, in spite of the harsh conditions operating at New Hope, but he also struggled with his personal feelings regarding slavery. Though an oppressive system, it was at the core of New Hope’s financial success and, therefore, Howe’s well-being as an employee. This book examines Howe’s diary entries in the thematic context of the local Costumbrista literary production. Costumbrismo both documented local customs and critically analyzed social ills. In his letters to relatives and friends Howe depicted a more personal reaction to the underpinnings of slavery practices, a reaction reflecting early abolitionist sentiments.

Rum Curious

The Indispensable Tasting Guide to the World's Spirit Fred Minnick ... Smuggler's Cove: Exotic Cocktails, Rum and the Cult of Tiki. New York: Ten Speed Press, 2016. ... And a Bottle of Rum: A History of the New World in Ten Cocktails.

Rum Curious

Rum Curious takes the reader on a tour of the world of rum, teaching the reader how to taste rum and appreciate all its glorious variety.

Food and World Culture Issues Impacts and Ingredients 2 volumes

This recipe is, in fact, very pleasant if the liquor is omitted. ... The Complete Book of Spirits: A Guide to Their History, Production, and Enjoyment. New York: ... And a Bottle of Rum: A History of the New World in Ten Cocktails.

Food and World Culture  Issues  Impacts  and Ingredients  2 volumes

This book uses food as a lens through which to explore important matters of society and culture. In exploring why and how people eat around the globe, the text focuses on issues of health, conflict, struggle, contest, inequality, and power.

The Cocktail Companion

Curtis, And a Bottle of Rum: A History of the New World in Ten Cocktails —Wayne “This book is a comprehensive, thoroughly researched, easy to read compendium of cocktail history. You can open it to any page and find yourself engrossed ...

The Cocktail Companion

Drink your way through history, learn tips from the best bartenders, and become a cocktail connoisseur with this fantastic guide. The Cocktail Companion spans the cocktail’s curious history from its roots in beer-swilling, 18th-century England through the illicit speakeasy culture of the United States Prohibition to the explosive, dynamic industry it is today. Learn about famous and classic cocktails from around the globe, how ice became one of the most important ingredients in mixed drink making, and how craft beers got so big, all with your own amazing drink?that you made yourself!?in hand. In The Cocktail Companion, well-known bartenders from across the United States offer up advice on everything, including using fresh-squeezed juices, finding artisanal bitters, and creating perfect cubes of ice that will help create intriguing, balanced cocktails. You’ll want to take your newfound knowledge from this cocktail book everywhere! The Cocktail Companion is a compendium of all things cocktail. This bar book features: 25 must-know recipes for iconic drinks such as the Manhattan and the Martini Cultural anecdotes and often-told myths about drinks’ origins Bar etiquette, terms, and tools to make even the newest drinker an expert in no time! If you liked The Drunken Botanist, The 12 Bottle Bar, or The Savoy Cocktail Book, you’ll love The Cocktail Companion! “Cheryl has demystified the cocktail and made it . . . fun and approachable! She takes us on an entertaining journey into the world of libations and those who serve them; their histories, stories, and antidotes. In the end, we better understand how we have arrived where we have and leave a more educated and appreciative imbiber!” —Tony Abou-Ganim The Modern Mixologist