And When the Rabbi Laughs

“And what did the rabbi teach you today?” asked the father of a young Hebrew school student. “He told us how Moses built amphibian platoons, launched a whole fleet of motorboats and sent lots of helicopters into the sky to protect the ...

  And When the Rabbi Laughs

Joy and humor are an integral part of Jewish tradition. The very name of Abrahams son, Yitzchak (Isaac), reflects his mothers laughter when she heard the good news of her forthcoming delivery of a child. She thought it hilarious that she would be blessed with a son in her advanced age. King David danced joyfully and publicly before the Holy Ark as it was being brought back to its home. The rabbis of the Talmud are famous for their antics in bringing happiness and laughter to the bride and groom at their wedding. In fact, the Psalms clearly state, Serve God with joy. (100:2). It is only in an optimistic and cheerful frame of mind that we can truly come close to the divine. Rabbi Weinberg inherited a love of Jewish humor from his family. He enjoys sharing entertaining stories with his congregants and friends. Finally, his grandchildren, who have not heard these repertoires very often, urged him to commit them to writing. He gladly took up the challenge and these enjoyable pages are the result. Please feel free to visit Rabbi Weinberg on his e-mail at [email protected]

Report of the General Director

When the Rabbi very holy I swear that I'll be ever true , Was feeling still more jolly , You're the Queen of all my ... Oh , oh , oh , oh , the general don't fear , I'll fix him up , you may be sure , AND WHEN THE RABBI LAUGHS With a ...

Report of the General Director


A Time to Laugh

The entire tribe bursts out laughing . The Chief , laughing himself , commands that a fork be given to the rabbi . The rabbi grabs the fork , starts poking himself all over the chest and stomach , and screams , " I hope your canoe sinks ...

A Time to Laugh

Argues that humor has a place in religion, that religion should sometimes poke fun and take itself lightly, and is diminished when it fails to understand and embrace humor.

God Laughed

Rabbi Meir, Rabbi Yehuda, and Rabbi Yosi went on a trip. When they arrived at a certain place, they looked for an inn. They were provided with one. They said tothe innkeeper: What is your name? Hereplied: Kidor. Rabbi Meir said: This ...

God Laughed

Humor has had a profound effect on the way the Jewish people see the world, and has sustained them through millennia of hardships and suffering. God Laughed reviews, organizes, and categorizes the humor of the ancient Jewish texts—the Hebrew Bible, the Talmud, and Midrash—in a clear, readable, and accessible manner. These works have influenced the Jewish people in many ways, and all are replete with humor and wit. Inevitably, this oeuvre of Jewish humor has itself influenced generations of comics, as well as genres of humor. The authors use examples of Biblical humor from several broad categories, including irony, sarcasm, wordplay, humorous names, humorous imagery, and humorous situations. Because their primary purpose is not to entertain, but to teach humanity how to live the ideal life, much of the humor in the Talmud and the Midrash has a single purpose: to demonstrate that evil is wrong and even, at times, ludicrous. This may help explain why approximately 1,500 years after its closing, the Talmud is still such a fascinating work. God Laughed is the latest addition to Transaction’s Jewish Studies series.

Encyclopedia of Judaism

The rabbi protests that the writer of the book is not so great, but the reader insists, and in the end punches the rabbi in the nose for insulting “the great Chafetz Chayim.” The rabbi laughs as he reveals his identity, and apologizes ...

Encyclopedia of Judaism

An illustrated A to Z reference containing over 800 entries providing information on the theology, people, historical events, institutions and movements related to the religion of Judaism.

The Golden Mountain

Marvellous Tales of Rabbi Israel Baal Shem, and of His Great-grandson, Rabbi Nachman, Retold from Hebrew, Yiddish and German Sources Naḥman (of Bratslav) ... The scholars could not understand what might have caused the Rabbi's laughter.

The Golden Mountain


The Golden Mountain

THE MYSTERIOUS LAUGHTER OF THE BAAL SHEM TOV, AND THE SABBATH OF SABBATAI, THE BOOKBINDER The meal of Sabbath eve was ready upon the table. Rabbi ... The scholars could not understand what might have caused the Rabbi's laughter.

The Golden Mountain

This is a collection of tales of the Eastern European Hassidic Jews, centering on the holy men Baal Shem Tov and Rabbi Nachman of Bratzlaw. Whilst having elements of folk tales, these magical stories of the Hassidic rabbis are also encoded with deeper spiritual levels of meaning and traditions. Stories include: Before He Was Born; Israel and the Enemy; The Book of Mysteries; The Secret Marriage; The Bride in her Grave; Rabbi Israel and the Sorcerer; Two Souls; The Standing Sheep; The Mad Dancers; Rabbi Israel and the Horse; The Burning Tree; The Water-Spirit; The Rich Man; The Trial of Rabbi Gershon; Rabbi Israel's Daughter; Prayer; Thrice He Laughed; The Burning of the Torah; The Boy's Song; The Wandering in Heaven; The Prophecy of the New Year; The False Messiah; The Holy Land; His Torah; After the Death; The Book of Mysteries; The Dynasty; The Lost Princess; The Broken Betrothal; The Cripple; The Bull and the Ram; The Prince; The Spider and the Fly; The Rabbi's Son; The Sage and the Simpleton; The King's Son and the Servant's Son; The Wind that Overturned the World; and, The Seven Beggars

Jewish Comedy A Serious History

The rabbis recite a verse of Jerusalem's glory, and juxtapose it with its desolation. Akiva, for his part, replies that this is precisely why he laughs: such a manifestation proves the predictive power of the biblical text, ...

Jewish Comedy  A Serious History

Finalist for the National Jewish Book Award “Dauber deftly surveys the whole recorded history of Jewish humour.” —Economist In a major work of scholarship that explores the funny side of some very serious business (and vice versa), Jeremy Dauber examines the origins of Jewish comedy and its development from biblical times to the age of Twitter. Organizing Jewish comedy into “seven strands”—including the satirical, the witty, and the vulgar—he traces the ways Jewish comedy has mirrored, and sometimes even shaped, the course of Jewish history. Dauber also explores the classic works of such masters of Jewish comedy as Sholem Aleichem, Isaac Babel, Franz Kafka, the Marx Brothers, Woody Allen, Joan Rivers, Philip Roth, Mel Brooks, Sarah Silverman, Jon Stewart, and Larry David, among many others.

New Jewish Voices

RABBI ( laughs , wags a finger ) : Never mind , never mind ! ( JOE re - enters . ) Oh , Mr. Electrician ! JOE : The name's Walski . Joe . RABBI : How do you do ? I'm Dr. Manfred Dorfman . We conversed on the phone .

New Jewish Voices

New Jewish Voices presents the first anthology of modern Jewish-American drama. These highly acclaimed plays, previously produced by New York City's nationally-renowned Jewish Repertory Theatre, offer an enjoyable and eye-opening introduction to the unique and modern voice of five young writers. The insights and visions of these playwrights will help redefine Jewish theater. While offering college students and amateur dramatic groups exciting new material, these five plays will entertain and delight every reader. An introduction by Edward M. Cohen, associate director of Jewish Repertory Theatre, outlines the history of Jewish theatre in America, the origins and development of the Jewish Repertory Theatre, the methods and programs of play development used at the theatre, and an analysis of current trends in modern Jewish playwriting. The anthology also includes production photos, a list of all plays produced by the theatre, and original scripts.

Die Laughing

They visit the rabbi, who offers an unusual suggestion. “I want you to hire a tall and handsome young man,” he tells them. “While the two of you are making love, have him stand by the bed and wave a towel over you.

Die Laughing

From the co-creator of the celebrated Big Book of Jewish Humor comes a laugh-out-loud collection of jokes about growing older that makes fun of memory loss, marriages, medicine, sex, the afterlife, and much more, making this the perfect gift for almost anyone who was born before you were. Growing older can be unsettling and surprising. (How on earth did this happen? Where did the years go?) So what better way to deal with this new stage of life than to laugh about your new reality? Die Laughing includes more than enough jokes (not to mention cartoons!) to let that laughter burst out. Whether it’s dealing with doctors, dating in one’s seventies, or unexpected bodily changes (not to mention funny noises), some things are easier to face with a smile of recognition. That’s why Die Laughing is the perfect gift for your parents, anyone celebrating a significant birthday, or any boomer with a sense of humor whose age begins with a six or higher.

Types and Motifs of the Judeo Spanish Folktales RLE Folklore

Recognizing him immediately, the rabbi laughs so hard that he dislodges the bone. Type: AT 1641B Physician in Spite of Himself. Because of wife's foolish report that her husband is a famous doctor he is commanded to cure the queen.

Types and Motifs of the Judeo Spanish Folktales  RLE Folklore

This monumental book, first published in 1992, represents a major contribution to Sephardic and Hispanic studies as well as to comparative folklore scholarship in a worldwide perspective. After many years of fieldwork and extensive archival investigations in Spain, Israel and the United States, the author has brought together and analysed a massive body of primary sources. This is the first collection of Sephardic narratives offered to the English-speaking reader, and constitutes an important addition to the understanding of Sephardic cultural tradition.

Maybe This Time

The rabbi laughed. “Well, I don't know about that, Dr. King. Looks to me like you haven't done so bad yourself And wait'll I tell Norman you're still as pretty as ever. Even with a wife and five kids, I think that boy still has a yen in ...

Maybe This Time

She'd been eaten up with guilt all her life, afraid to face the truth, and now, in some strange way, by recalling what had happened in her family she felt almost liberated. It was as if a great weight had suddenly been lifted off her shoulders and now she was free-except for the door that had closed against her heart where Max was concerned. Bile rose in her throat thinking of him and once started she couldn't stop crying as she suffered through the slow, agonizing death of her soul.

Hanoch Levin Selected Plays Three

(Relaxes on the bed and laughs.) You're dying to be Flotsika, ... ZNEIDUCH: See you tomorrow at the Rabbi? FLOTSIKA: (Laughs as ... (She calms down, wipes the tears of laughter away, pats his back appreciatively.) Go, get lost, stupid, ...

Hanoch Levin  Selected Plays Three

'Hanoch Levin is the modern world on the stage... we badly need to hear what he has to say.' David Lan Hanoch Levin was one of Israel's leading dramatists. Born in Tel Aviv in 1943, his work includes comedies, tragedies, and satirical cabarets, most of which he directed himself. He received numerous theatre awards both in Israel and abroad and his plays have been staged around the world. Levin was awarded the Bialik Prize in 1994. Published in brand-new English translations, these selected volumes of Hanoch Levin, one of Israel's leading dramatists, aim to bring one of the most important playwrights of the Middle East to English speaking audiences. Plays Three contains the plays The Thin Soldier, Bachelors and Bachelorettes (2002), Everyone Wants to Live, The Constant Mourner (2019) and The Lamenters (2000).

The Rabbi s Cholent

The rabbi laughed. “Is that all? Let me show you something.” He took out a small pile of letters from his inner jacket pocket. “Just look. They address me that way, too!” “The golden PaTh” T he story is told of a.

The Rabbi s Cholent

An old maxim states that a rabbi delivers three sermons every Shabbat morning. The first is the one he prepares. The second is the one he delivers, followed by the third which is the one he wishes he would have delivered. The bulk of this book is inspired by the third part of this adage. There are so many ideas, concepts and even proverbs which the author was eager to share with his congregants, students and friends. However, people’s lives are busy and few opportunities present themselves to express favorite and cherished perceptions and ideas. Since Rabbi Weinberg’s hobby is to cook, bake and putter in the kitchen, the thought struck him that an in-tellectual/spiritual “cholent recipe” encapsulated in the pages of a book might give him and his readers an enriching experience. The themes are eclectic and run a free course. They are culled from study, experience and much of what has been heard and observed. The reader is invited to enter this charming world of thought, hypo-thesis and speculation. Each essay will doubtless trigger many personal thoughts and experiences in its wake.

Mama Namibia

The rabbi breaks the awkward silence that followed my outburst. “Be that as it may, Yaakov, ... I know better than to argue with the rabbi in front of Papa. But I make a mental note: “He's not ... The rabbi laughs rather hollowly.

Mama Namibia

Mama Namibia is based on the compelling, true story of an innocent Herero girl whose life portrays the suffering, perseverance, and resilience of the Herero and Nama people as they faced their most daunting test - a genocide that proved to be the training grounds for the Holocaust."

We Plan God Laughs

In WE PLAN, GOD LAUGHS, Sherre Hirsch argues that too often our plans are limited to ones we think up at bedtime, or are devised by our parents, or by what looks good on a résumé.

We Plan  God Laughs

The old Yiddish proverb, “We plan, God laughs,” expresses a truth everyone can relate to. At every stage of life we make plans, setting out where we want to go and imagining what we will be like when we have “arrived.” But things have a way of turning out not quite as we hoped or expected. In WE PLAN, GOD LAUGHS, Sherre Hirsch argues that too often our plans are limited to ones we think up at bedtime, or are devised by our parents, or by what looks good on a résumé. Addressing serious spiritual issues, Hirsch takes readers through ten basics steps for formulating a plan that reflects who we are now and who we want to be—a plan that is alive, organic, and in sync with God. Hirsch teaches the importance of letting go and recognizing that even the most ordinary life is extraordinary in the eyes of God. She makes no foolish promise that life will turn out as we plan, but shows that with hope, faith, and belief, we can change our lives for the better and make a positive difference in the lives of others.

Sarah Laughed

The Baal Shem Tov once asked his disciple, Rabbi Meir, if he remembered one Sabbath when he was just beginning to study the Torah. Rabbi Meir's father's house was filled with guests, and Meir had been lifted up onto the table so that he ...

Sarah Laughed

Vanessa Ochs retells well known stories of Biblical women in terms that will inspire women today. Beginning with Eve, she adds a reflection on the lesson each story has to offer, then offers a ritual for each.

Why the Baal Shem Tov Laughed

Fifty-two Stories about Our Great Chasidic Rabbis Sterna Citron. That is how he remained till the next erev Shabbos when, lo and behold, right before the eyes of his friends and acquaintances, Hirsh became a prince again.

Why the Baal Shem Tov Laughed

Jewish tradition is rich in stories, many of which center around the lives and work of the great chasidic rabbis, known as rebbes. As a child, Sterna Citron, who descends from distinguished rabbinic families, was surrounded by these stories. Each night at bedtime, her father, the late Rabbi Eli Chaim Carlebach, a member of one of the most outstanding rabbinic families of Germany, would tell her stories. Fifty-two of these stories, many of which appear here for the first time in English, are now collected in Why the Baal Shem Tov Laughed: Fifty-two Stories about Our Great Chasidic Rabbis.

Muck

The chief rabbi looked at the dog and bristled—Oy, where's your yarmulke? ... No one laughed at the joke, and that was a pity, since the silence only encouraged the rabbi to try out another: So why is the glass broken under the canopy ...

Muck

“Those who lament that the novel has lost its prophecy should pay heed and cover-price: Muck is the future, both of Jerusalem and of literature. God is showing some rare good taste, by choosing to speak to us through Dror Burstein.” —Joshua Cohen, author of Moving Kings and Book of Numbers In a Jerusalem both ancient and modern, where the First Temple squats over the populace like a Trump casino, where the streets are literally crawling with prophets and heathen helicopters buzz over Old Testament sovereigns, two young poets are about to have their lives turned upside down. Struggling Jeremiah is worried that he might be wasting his time trying to be a writer; the great critic Broch just beat him over the head with his own computer keyboard. Mattaniah, on the other hand, is a real up-and-comer—but he has a secret he wouldn’t want anyone in the literary world to know: his late father was king of Judah. Jeremiah begins to despair, and in that despair has a vision: that Jerusalem is doomed, and that Mattaniah will not only be forced to ascend to the throne but will thereafter witness his people slaughtered and exiled. But what does it mean to tell a friend and rival that his future is bleak? What sort of grudges and biases turn true vision into false prophecy? Can the very act of speaking a prediction aloud make it come true? And, if so, does that make you a seer, or just a schmuck? Dramatizing the eternal dispute between poetry and power, between faith and practicality, between haves and have-nots, Dror Burstein’s Muck is a brilliant and subversive modern-dress retelling of the book of Jeremiah: a comedy with apocalyptic stakes by a star of Israeli fiction.