Animation in China

" As a theoretical exploration of animation in the People’s Republic of China, this book will appeal greatly to students and scholars of animation, film studies, Chinese studies, cultural studies, political and cultural theory.

Animation in China

By the turn of the 21st century, animation production has grown to thousands of hours a year in the People’s Republic of China (PRC). Despite this, and unlike American blockbuster productions and the diverse genres of Japanese anime, much animation from the PRC remains relatively unknown. This book is an historical and theoretical study of animation in the PRC. Although the Wan Brothers produced the first feature length animated film in 1941, the industry as we know it today truly began in the 1950s at the Shanghai Animation Film Studio (SAFS), which remained the sole animation studio until the 1980s. Considering animation in China as a convergence of the institutions of education, fine arts, literature, popular culture, and film, the book takes comparative approaches that link SAFS animation to contemporary cultural production including American and Japanese animation, Pop Art, and mass media theory. Through readings of classic films such as Princess Iron Fan, Uproar in Heaven, Princess Peacock, and Nezha Conquers the Dragon King, this study represents a revisionist history of animation in the PRC as a form of "postmodernism with Chinese characteristics." As a theoretical exploration of animation in the People’s Republic of China, this book will appeal greatly to students and scholars of animation, film studies, Chinese studies, cultural studies, political and cultural theory.

The History of Chinese Animation I

This book describes the history, present and future of China’s animation industry. The author divides the business’s 95-year history into six periods and analyses each of these from an historical, aesthetic, and artistic perspective.

The History of Chinese Animation I

China has been one of the first countries to develop its own aesthetic for dynamic images and to create animation films with distinctive characteristics. In recent years, however, and subject to the influence of Western and Japanese animation, the Chinese animation industry has experienced several new stages of development, prompting the question as to where animation in China is heading in the future. This book describes the history, present and future of China’s animation industry. The author divides the business’s 95-year history into six periods and analyses each of these from an historical, aesthetic, and artistic perspective. In addition, the book focuses on representative works; themes; directions; artistic styles; techniques; industrial development; government support policies; business models; the nurturing of education and talent; broadcasting systems and animation. Scholars and students who are interested in the history of Chinese animation will benefit from this book and it will appeal additionally to readers interested in Chinese film studies.

Chinese Animation

Although it is almost impossible to completely cover 90 years of filmmaking, this book provides a comprehensible introduction to the industry's infancy, its Golden Age (Shanghai Animation Film Studio) and today's Chinese animation (in ...

Chinese Animation

With an output of more than 250,000 minutes annually, and with roughly 5,000 producers and production units, the Chinese are leading the field of animated films. Although it is almost impossible to completely cover 90 years of filmmaking, this book provides a comprehensible introduction to the industry’s infancy, its Golden Age (Shanghai Animation Film Studio) and today’s Chinese animation (in feature films, television series and student films). There are classics such as Princess Iron Fan (made at the time of the Japanese occupation) and the color Havoc in Heaven, both starring the Monkey King Sun Wukong, as well as countless TV stars (Blue Cat, Pleasant Goat and Big Big Wolf) and many almost unknown works by young filmmakers who are not focusing on an audience of children (like most of the industry output).

The History of Chinese Animation II

This book describes the history, present and future of China’s animation industry. The author divides the business’s 95-year history into six periods and analyses each of these from an historical, aesthetic, and artistic perspective.

The History of Chinese Animation II

China has been one of the first countries to develop its own aesthetic for dynamic images and to create animation films with distinctive characteristics. In recent years, however, and subject to the influence of Western and Japanese animation, the Chinese animation industry has experienced several new stages of development, prompting the question as to where animation in China is heading in the future. This book describes the history, present and future of China’s animation industry. The author divides the business’s 95-year history into six periods and analyses each of these from an historical, aesthetic, and artistic perspective. In addition, the book focuses on representative works, themes, directions, artistic styles, techniques, industrial development, government support policies, business models, the nurturing of education and talent, broadcasting systems, and animation. Scholars and students who are interested in the history of Chinese animation will benefit from this book and it will appeal additionally to readers interested in Chinese film studies.

The History of Chinese Animation

This book describes the history, present and future of China’s animation industry. The author divides the business’s 95-year history into six periods and analyses each of these from an historical, aesthetic, and artistic perspective.

The History of Chinese Animation

China has been one of the first countries to develop its own aesthetic for dynamic images and to create animation films with distinctive characteristics. In recent years, however, and subject to the influence of Western and Japanese animation, the Chinese animation industry has experienced several new stages of development, prompting the question as to where animation in China is heading in the future. This book describes the history, present and future of China’s animation industry. The author divides the business’s 95-year history into six periods and analyses each of these from an historical, aesthetic, and artistic perspective. In addition, the book focuses on representative works; themes; directions; artistic styles; techniques; industrial development; government support policies; business models; the nurturing of education and talent; broadcasting systems and animation. Scholars and students who are interested in the history of Chinese animation will benefit from this book and it will appeal additionally to readers interested in Chinese film studies.

The New Generation in Chinese Animation

Addressing the series Boonie Bears/Xiong Chumo (2014-5), Chen focuses on the films' adaptation from the original TV series, and how the films were promoted across generations and by means of both online and offline channels.

The New Generation in Chinese Animation

In 1995 Chinese animated filmmaking ceased to be a state-run enterprise and was plunged into the free market. Using key animated films as his case studies, Shaopeng Chen examines new generation Chinese animation in its aesthetic and industrial contexts. He argues that, unlike its predecessors, this new generation does not have a distinctive national identity, but represents an important stage of diversity and exploration in the history of Chinese animation. Chen identifies distinct characteristics of new generation filmmaking, including an orientation towards young audiences and the recurring figure of the immortal monkey-like Sun Wukong. He explores how films such as Lotus Lantern/Baolian Deng (1999) responded to competition from American imports such as The Lion King (1994), retaining Chinese iconography while at the same time adopting Hollywood aesthetics and techniques. Addressing the series Boonie Bears/Xiong Chumo (2014-5), Chen focuses on the films' adaptation from the original TV series, and how the films were promoted across generations and by means of both online and offline channels. Discussing the series Kuiba/Kui Ba (2011, 2013, 2014), Chen examines Vasoon Animation Studio's ambitious attempt to create the first Chinese-style high fantasy fictional universe, and considers why the first film was a critical success but a failure at the box-office. He also explores the relationship between Japanese anime and new generation Chinese animation. Finally, Chen considers how word-of-mouth social media engagement lay behind the success of Monkey King: Hero is Back (2015).

Chinese Animation Creative Industries and Digital Culture

This book explores the development of the Chinese animation film industry from the beginning of China’s reform process up to the present.

Chinese Animation  Creative Industries  and Digital Culture

This book explores the development of the Chinese animation film industry from the beginning of China’s reform process up to the present. It discusses above all the relationship between the communist state’s policies to stimulate "creative industries", concepts of creativity and aesthetics, and the creation and maintenance , through changing circumstances, of a national style by Chinese animators. The book also examines the relationship between Chinese animation, changing technologies including the rise first of television and then of digital media, and youth culture, demonstrating the importance of Chinese animation in Chinese youth culture in the digital age.

The Chinese Animation Industry from the Mao Era to the Digital Age

Since the 1950's the Chinese Animation industry has been trying to create a unique national style for China.

 The Chinese Animation Industry  from the Mao Era to the Digital Age

Since the 1950's the Chinese Animation industry has been trying to create a unique national style for China. The national style of the 1950's and early 1960's was one of freedom, fantasy, and creativity. With the success of "Heroic Little Sisters of the Grassland" (1965), the government administration, namely Jiang Qing of the "Gang of Four", demanded that all animation should follow specific guidelines based on Social Realism guidelines. This in turn, ushered in a new national style of animation during the Cultural Revolution(1966-1976). During this ten-year period government policies imposed strict restrictions on animators and cause a drain of creative talents-setting the industry decades behind internationally. When the Mao Era ended in the late 1970s the Chinese animation industry enjoyed a brief period of domestic growth. But new challenges occurred when China opened its doors to the world in 1985, which allowed Japanese animation to come in like a storm. For the next two decades, Chinese media was flooded with Japanese anime, and Chinese animation struggled for a place on tv until the early 2000's. This research asks the question of what factors have prevented Chinese animation from succeeding both internationally and globally. It also looks at how these factors have contributed both negatively and positively to the animation industry. The main factors attributing to China's struggle from the 1940s until today are as follows: government policies, national style, and the influence of foreign animation in China.

Chinese Independent Animation

Animation, the author argues, has a special significance, as the nature of the animation text is itself multilayered and given to multiple interpretations and avenues of engagement.

Chinese Independent Animation

This study of ‘independent’ animation opens up a quietly subversive and vibrant dimension of contemporary Chinese culture which, hitherto, has not received as much attention as dissident art or political activism. Scholarly interest in Chinese animation has increased over the last decade, with attention paid to the conventional media circle of production, distribution and consumption. The ‘independent’ sector has been largely ignored however, until now. By focusing on distinctive independent artists like Pisan and Lei Lei, and situating their work within the present day media ecology, the author examines the relationship between the genre and the sociocultural transformation of contemporary China. Animation, the author argues, has a special significance, as the nature of the animation text is itself multilayered and given to multiple interpretations and avenues of engagement. Through an examination of the affordances of this ‘independent’ media entity, the author explores how this multifaceted cultural form reveals ambiguities that parallel contradictions in art and society. In so doing, independent animation provides a convenient ‘mirror’ for examining how recent social upheavals have been negotiated, and how certain practitioners have found effective ways for discussing the post-Socialist reality within the current political configuration.

Chinese Animation

Please note that the content of this book primarily consists of articles available from Wikipedia or other free sources online.

Chinese Animation

Please note that the content of this book primarily consists of articles available from Wikipedia or other free sources online. Pages: 25. Chapters: History of Chinese animation, Pleasant Goat and Big Big Wolf, AI Football GGO, Xiao Xiao, Astro Plan, Calabash Brothers, Zentrix, Old Master Q, Nezha, 3000 Whys of Blue Cat, The Olympic Adventures of Fuwa, Century Sonny, Cyber Weapon Z, Music Up, Lan Mao, Wanderings of Sanmao, Black Cat Detective, Qin's Moon, Chess Player, Tortoise Hanba's Stories, The Dreaming Girl, The Blue Mouse and the Big Faced Cat, SkyEye, Romance of the Three Kingdoms, List of Chinese animated series. Excerpt: Chinese animation (simplified Chinese: traditional Chinese: pinyin: Huarenzhi donghua) or Manhua Anime, in narrow sense, refers to animations that are made in China. In broad sense, it may refers to animations that are made in any Chinese speaking countries such as People's Republic of China (mainland China), Republic of China (Taiwan), Hong Kong, Singapore, Malaysia, etc. The history of Chinese animation began in 1918 when an animation piece from the US titled Out of the Inkwell landed in Shanghai. Cartoon clips were first used in advertisements for domestic products. Though the animation industry did not begin until the arrival of the Wan brothers in 1926. From the first film with sound The Camel's Dance to the first film of notable length Princess Iron Fan, China was relatively on pace with the rest of the world. Though China's golden age of animation would come to a complete halt when the Chinese Communist Party led by Mao Zedong introduced the Cultural Revolution. Many animators were forced to quit. If not for harsh economic conditions, the mistreatment of the Red Guards would threaten their work. The surviving animations would lean closer to propaganda. By the 1980s, Japan would emerge as the animation powerhouse of the Far East, leaving China's industry decimated in reputation and productivity. Though two major changes...

Chinese Animation and Socialism

This is the first book in English on Chinese animation and socialism that introduces the insider viewpoints of socialist animators at the Shanghai Animation Film Studio.

Chinese Animation and Socialism

This is the first book in English on Chinese animation and socialism that introduces the insider viewpoints of socialist animators at the Shanghai Animation Film Studio. A timely and useful reference book for researchers, students, animators, and fans interested in Chinese and even world animation.

A Comparative Study of Chinese and Japanese Animation

Until today, anime (Japanese animation) is popular all over the world.

A Comparative Study of Chinese and Japanese Animation

Until today, anime (Japanese animation) is popular all over the world. But China, it has the ability to make animation, but the problem is why anime is more popular than Chinese animation in China. So, I according to from history, policy and innovation to describe why anime are popular in China, and how China resolve the problem for animation industry in China.

Comics Art in China

This volume encompasses political, social, and gag cartoons, lianhuanhua (picture books), comic books, humorous drawings, cartoon and humor periodicals, and donghua (animation) while exploring topics ranging from the earliest Western ...

Comics Art in China

In the most comprehensive and authoritative source on this subject, Comics Art in China covers almost all comics art forms in mainland China, providing the history from the nineteenth century to the present as well as perspectives on both the industry and the art form. This volume encompasses political, social, and gag cartoons, lianhuanhua (picture books), comic books, humorous drawings, cartoon and humor periodicals, and donghua (animation) while exploring topics ranging from the earliest Western-influenced cartoons and the popular, often salacious, 1930s humor magazines to cartoons as wartime propaganda and comics art in the reform. Coupling a comprehensive review of secondary materials (histories, anthologies, biographies, memoirs, and more) in English and Chinese with the artists" actual works, the result spans more than two centuries of Chinese animation. Structured chronologically, the study begins with precursors in early China and proceeds through the Republican, wartime, Communist, and market economy periods. Based primarily on interviews senior scholar John A. Lent and Xu Ying conducted with over one hundred cartoonists, animators, and other comics art figures, Comics Art in China sheds light on tumult and triumphs. Meticulously, Lent and Xu describe the evolution of Chinese comics within a global context, probing the often-tense relationship between expression and government, as well as proving that art can be a powerful force for revolution. Indeed, the authors explore Chinese comics art as it continues to grow and adapt in the twenty-first century. Enhanced with over one hundred black-and-white and color illustrations, this book stands out as not only the first such survey in English, but perhaps the most complete one in any language.

The New Generation in Chinese Animation

70 Daisy Yan Du, Animated Encounters: Transnational Movements of Chinese Animation, 1940s–1970s (Honolulu: University of Hawai'i Press, 2019), 27. 71 Weihua Wu, Chinese Animation, Creative Industries, and Digital Culture (London and New ...

The New Generation in Chinese Animation

In 1995 Chinese animated filmmaking ceased to be a state-run enterprise and was plunged into the free market. Using key animated films as his case studies, Shaopeng Chen examines new generation Chinese animation in its aesthetic and industrial contexts. He argues that, unlike its predecessors, this new generation does not have a distinctive national identity, but represents an important stage of diversity and exploration in the history of Chinese animation. Chen identifies distinct characteristics of new generation filmmaking, including an orientation towards young audiences and the recurring figure of the immortal monkey-like Sun Wukong. He explores how films such as Lotus Lantern/Baolian Deng (1999) responded to competition from American imports such as The Lion King (1994), retaining Chinese iconography while at the same time adopting Hollywood aesthetics and techniques. Addressing the series Boonie Bears/Xiong Chumo (2014-5), Chen focuses on the films' adaptation from the original TV series, and how the films were promoted across generations and by means of both online and offline channels. Discussing the series Kuiba/Kui Ba (2011, 2013, 2014), Chen examines Vasoon Animation Studio's ambitious attempt to create the first Chinese-style high fantasy fictional universe, and considers why the first film was a critical success but a failure at the box-office. He also explores the relationship between Japanese anime and new generation Chinese animation. Finally, Chen considers how word-of-mouth social media engagement lay behind the success of Monkey King: Hero is Back (2015).

Animated Encounters

In Animated Encounters Daisy Yan Du addresses this omission in her study of Chinese animation and its engagement with international forces during its formative period, the 1940s–1970s.

Animated Encounters

China’s role in the history of world animation has been trivialized or largely forgotten. In Animated Encounters Daisy Yan Du addresses this omission in her study of Chinese animation and its engagement with international forces during its formative period, the 1940s–1970s. She introduces readers to transnational movements in early Chinese animation, tracing the involvement of Japanese, Soviet, American, Taiwanese, and China’s ethnic minorities, at socio-historical or representational levels, in animated filmmaking in China. Du argues that Chinese animation was international almost from its inception and that such border-crossing exchanges helped make it “Chinese” and subsequently transform the history of world animation. She highlights animated encounters and entanglements to provide an alternative to current studies of the subject characterized by a preoccupation with essentialist ideas of “Chineseness” and further questions the long-held belief that the forty-year-period in question was a time of cultural isolationism for China due to constant wars and revolutions. China’s socialist era, known for the pervasiveness of its political propaganda and suppression of the arts, unexpectedly witnessed a golden age of animation. Socialist collectivism, reinforced by totalitarian politics and centralized state control, allowed Chinese animation to prosper and flourish artistically. In addition, the double marginality of animation—a minor art form for children—coupled with its disarming qualities and intrinsic malleability and mobility, granted animators and producers the double power to play with politics and transgress ideological and geographical borders while surviving censorship, both at home and abroad. A captivating and enlightening history, Animated Encounters will attract scholars and students of world film and animation studies, children’s culture, and modern Chinese history.

Who Gets Funds from China s Capital Market

The subject of this book is an analysis of the business models developed or adopted by Chinese small and medium sized enterprises (SMEs), specifically those that are successfully listed on China’s capital market; in other words, it is a ...

Who Gets Funds from China   s Capital Market

The subject of this book is an analysis of the business models developed or adopted by Chinese small and medium sized enterprises (SMEs), specifically those that are successfully listed on China’s capital market; in other words, it is a dissection of those Chinese business models that have “worked.” In China, there are over 10 million companies that are registered with China’s State Industrial and Commercial Administration and over 40 million unregistered businesses. Among them, only about 1,000 companies became successfully listed on China’s capital market and were able to obtain public funds from equity investors. This book takes a look at who these “lucky ones” were and what business models led to their success in a highly competitive Chinese market, investigations that will certainly be of interest to both Chinese and international readerships. In addition, this book provides a nuanced and micro view of the Chinese economy. As China’s economy increasingly receives attention worldwide, the amount of research and publications on China’s economy is also growing exponentially. However, the majority of these studies only focus on the macro level of the Chinese economy and aggregate variables such as GDP, growth rate, inflation, etc., while little research has been done at a micro and company level to analyze the Chinese economy. Thus, this book’s focus on the case studies of representative firms may help fill some gaps in the study of business and the economy in China. Furthermore, this book hopes to dispel certain misconceptions about the nature of the Chinese economy. There is currently a stereotypical view about Chinese economy, for example that China, as the workshop of the world, primarily produces low-end products with low prices to be sold in other countries by budget retailers like Wal-Mart or dollar stores. While that is true to some extent, it is certainly not the whole story. The companies analyzed in this book cover a wide spectrum of industries including modern agriculture, alternative energy, resources recycling, mobile games, animation, luxury products, supply chain management, filmmaking and TV series production, displaying to readers the brand-new industrial structure of Chinese companies in the 21st century.

The History of Chinese Animation II

30 Years of China Artistic Animation. Hangzhou: Zhejiang University Press, 2008. Cheng Jihua, Li Shaobai & Xing Zuwen. History of China Film. Beijing: China Film Press, 1981. China Animation Association. Footprint Reflections (China ...

The History of Chinese Animation II

China has been one of the first countries to develop its own aesthetic for dynamic images and to create animation films with distinctive characteristics. In recent years, however, and subject to the influence of Western and Japanese animation, the Chinese animation industry has experienced several new stages of development, prompting the question as to where animation in China is heading in the future. This book describes the history, present and future of China’s animation industry. The author divides the business’s 95-year history into six periods and analyses each of these from an historical, aesthetic, and artistic perspective. In addition, the book focuses on representative works, themes, directions, artistic styles, techniques, industrial development, government support policies, business models, the nurturing of education and talent, broadcasting systems, and animation. Scholars and students who are interested in the history of Chinese animation will benefit from this book and it will appeal additionally to readers interested in Chinese film studies.

An Analysis of the Profitability of China s Animation Sector

This thesis aims to both contextualize and create a business plan for an animation production project that features "edutainment" (education and entertainment) elements, targeting children aged 7 to16 from China and the United States.

An Analysis of the Profitability of China s Animation Sector

This thesis aims to both contextualize and create a business plan for an animation production project that features "edutainment" (education and entertainment) elements, targeting children aged 7 to16 from China and the United States. To support and solidify the development of this business plan, systematic research and analysis were conducted about the historical background and current status of the Chinese animation and the U.S. animation industry. Affected by the Cultural Revolution and impacted by the domination of foreign animated products for decades, the Chinese animation sector has experienced a difficult process of evolution until the early years of the twenty-first century. Following the global trend, the government and citizens of China have now realized the importance of creative industries in fostering the country's economy. Animation has been identified as a pivotal industry, slated to be developed. New policies have been issued by the relevant state administration to create a favorable business environment for local animation producers to develop proprietary animated productions. By analyzing the operational and profit-generating system of leading U.S. animation companies, such as the Walt Disney Company, this thesis intends to provide practical suggestions and strategies based on the U.S. experience, which may be applicable to the Chinese animation sector. Using the analysis of business operation methods developed in the first part of the thesis, Chinese producers might be able to generate profit from the underdeveloped domestic market. The business plan, which is intended to be pitched to China-based and/or the America-based investors, outlines the production of a 20-25 episode pilot of the two-dimensional animated series Super Monkey King that I am currently developing. The second part of this thesis includes the investment portfolio and the pitch materials developed for investors. This production is a long-term project that will be further developed after the submission of this thesis.

China s iGeneration

This book is open access and available on www.bloomsburycollections.com. It is funded by Knowledge Unlatched.

China s iGeneration

This book is open access and available on www.bloomsburycollections.com. It is funded by Knowledge Unlatched. This innovative collection of essays on twenty-first century Chinese cinema and moving image culture features contributions from an international community of scholars, critics, and practitioners. Taken together, their perspectives make a compelling case that the past decade has witnessed a radical transformation of conventional notions of cinema. Following China's accession to the WTO in 2001, personal and collective experiences of changing social conditions have added new dimensions to the increasingly diverse Sinophone media landscape, and provided a novel complement to the existing edifice of blockbusters, documentaries, and auteur culture. The numerous 'iGeneration' productions and practices examined in this volume include 3D and IMAX films, experimental documentaries, animation, visual aides-mémoires, and works of pirated pastiche. Together, they bear witness to the emergence of a new Chinese cinema characterized by digital and, trans-media representational strategies, the blurring of private/public distinctions, and dynamic reinterpretations of the very notion of 'cinema' itself.