Ann Radcliffe Romanticism and the Gothic

This book offers unique and fresh perspectives upon the literary productions of one of the most highly remunerated and widely admired authors of the Romantic period, Ann Radcliffe (1764–1823).

Ann Radcliffe  Romanticism and the Gothic

This book offers unique and fresh perspectives upon the literary productions of one of the most highly remunerated and widely admired authors of the Romantic period, Ann Radcliffe (1764–1823). While drawing upon, consolidating and enriching the critical impulses reflected in Radcliffe scholarship to date, this collection of essays, composed by a range of renowned scholars of the Romantic period, also foregrounds the hitherto neglected aspects of the author's work. Radcliffe's relations to Romantic-era travel writing; the complex political ideologies that lie behind her historiographic endeavours; her poetry and its relation to institutionalised forms of Romanticism; and her literary connections to eighteenth-century women's writing are all examined in this collection. Offering fresh considerations of the well-known Gothic fictions and extending the appreciation of Radcliffe in new critical directions, the collection reappraises Radcliffe's full oeuvre within the wider literary and political contexts of her time.

Ann Radcliffe Romanticism and the Gothic

ANN. RADCLIFFE,. ROMANTICISM. AND. THE. GOTHIC. This book offers unique and fresh perspectives upon the literary productions of one of the most highly remunerated and widely admired authors of the Romantic period, Ann Radcliffe ...

Ann Radcliffe  Romanticism and the Gothic

The first fully comprehensive collection of essays devoted to the fictional output of prolific Romantic author, Ann Radcliffe.

Ann Radcliffe Romanticism and the Gothic

The first fully comprehensive collection of essays devoted to the fictional output of prolific Romantic author, Ann Radcliffe.

Ann Radcliffe  Romanticism and the Gothic

The first fully comprehensive collection of essays devoted to the fictional output of prolific Romantic author, Ann Radcliffe.

Romantic Gothic

"Traces the Gothic impulses in proto-Romantic and Romantic British, American and European culture, 1740-1830"--Quatrième de couverture.

Romantic Gothic

"Traces the Gothic impulses in proto-Romantic and Romantic British, American and European culture, 1740-1830"--Quatrième de couverture.

Handbook of the British Novel in the Long Eighteenth Century

A New Companion to the Gothic. Ed. Punter, David. Malden, MA: Wiley-Blackwell, 2012. 95–108. Miles, Robert. “Popular Romanticism and the Problem of Belief: The Mysteries of Udolpho.” Ann Radcliffe, Romanticism, and the Gothic.

Handbook of the British Novel in the Long Eighteenth Century

The handbook offers a comprehensive introduction to the British novel in the long eighteenth century, when this genre emerged to develop into the period’s most versatile and popular literary form. Part I features six systematic chapters that discuss literary, intellectual, socio-economic, and political contexts, providing innovative approaches to issues such as sense and sentiment, gender considerations, formal characteristics, economic history, enlightened and radical concepts of citizenship and human rights, ecological ramifications, and Britain’s growing global involvement. Part II presents twenty-five analytical chapters that attend to individual novels, some canonical and others recently recovered. These analyses engage the debates outlined in the systematic chapters, undertaking in-depth readings that both contextualize the works and draw on relevant criticism, literary theory, and cultural perspectives. The handbook’s breadth and depth, clear presentation, and lucid language make it attractive and accessible to scholar and student alike.

The Cambridge History of the Gothic Volume 1 Gothic in the Long Eighteenth Century

This first volume of The Cambridge History of the Gothic provides a rigorous account of the Gothic in Western civilisation, from the Goths' sacking of Rome in 410 AD through to its manifestations in British and European culture of the long ...

The Cambridge History of the Gothic  Volume 1  Gothic in the Long Eighteenth Century

This first volume of The Cambridge History of the Gothic provides a rigorous account of the Gothic in Western civilisation, from the Goths' sacking of Rome in 410 AD through to its manifestations in British and European culture of the long eighteenth century. Written by international cast of leading scholars, the chapters explore the interdisciplinary nature of the Gothic in the fields of history, literature, architecture and fine art. As much a cultural history of Gothic as an account of the ways in which the Gothic has participated within a number of formative historical events across time, the volume offers fresh perspectives on familiar themes while also drawing new critical attention to a range of hitherto overlooked concerns. From writers such as Horace Walpole and Ann Radcliffe to eighteenth-century politics and theatre, the volume provides a thorough and engaging overview of early Gothic culture in Britain and beyond.

Locating Ann Radcliffe

For Coleridge on Radcliffe's explained supernatural, see Dale Townshend and Angela Wright, “Gothic and Romantic Engagements,” Ann Radcliffe, Romanticism and the Gothic, ed. Dale Townshend and Angela Wright (Cambridge: ...

Locating Ann Radcliffe

This volume broadens the critical understanding of Ann Radcliffe’s work and includes explorations of the publication history of her work, her engagement with contemporary accounts of aesthetics, her travel writing, and her poetry. Ann Radcliffe (1764-1823) was the best-selling author of the eighteenth century and her Gothic novels set the tone for a generation of Gothic writers. Regarded as having made a pioneering contribution to the Female Gothic of the period she was also an important critic of the Gothic’s different forms. This collection also includes an analysis of Radcliffe’s account of her medical ailments in her Commonplace Book which provides a new way of thinking about female bodies in pain and how they are represented in her novels. The collection provides an important critical reassessment of a major Gothic writer of the period. It will be of interest to scholars working on the Gothic, eighteenth-century literature, and women’s writing. This book was originally published as a special issue of Women’s Writing.

The Handbook of the Gothic

This revised edition of The Handbook of the Gothic contains over twenty new entries on Gothic writers such as Stephen King and Daphne Du Maurier, new genres such as African-American Gothic, new terms like Gothic Graphic Novel and Comic, and ...

The Handbook of the Gothic

From Anne Rice’s best-selling novels to our recurrent interest in vampires and the occult, the Gothic has an unyielding hold on our imagination. But what exactly does "Gothic" mean? How does it differ from "terror" or "horror," and where do its parameters lie? Through a wide range of brief essays written by leading scholars, The Handbook of the Gothic, second edition, provides a virtual encyclopedia of things Gothic. From the Demonic to the Uncanny, the Bronte sisters to Melville, this volume plots the characteristics of Gothic’s vastly different schools and manifestations, offering a comprehensive guide of Gothic writing and culture. Among the many topics and figures discussed are: American Gothic, the Bronte Sisters, Angela Carter, the Demonic, Female Gothic, Ghost Stories, Film, Washington Irving, Henry James, H. P. Lovecraft, Madness, Herman Melville, Monstrosity, Orientalism, Post-Colonial Gothic, Anne Rice, Romanticism, Sado-Masochism, Bram Stoker, the Sublime, the Uncanny, Vampires, and Werewolves. This revised edition of The Handbook of the Gothic contains over twenty new entries on Gothic writers such as Stephen King and Daphne Du Maurier, new genres such as African-American Gothic, new terms like Gothic Graphic Novel and Comic, and a new preface which situates the handbook within current studies of the Gothic.

Figures of the Imagination

Dale Townshend and Angela Wright, 'Gothic and Romantic Engagements: The Critical Reception of Ann Radcliffe, 1789–1850,' in Ann Radcliffe, Romanticism and the Gothic, eds Dale Townshend and Angela Wright (Cambridge: Cambridge University ...

Figures of the Imagination

This new study of the intersection of romance novels with vocal music records a society on the cusp of modernisation, with a printing industry emerging to serve people’s growing appetites for entertainment amidst their changing views of religion and the occult. No mere diversion, fiction was integral to musical culture and together both art forms reveal key intellectual currents that circulated in the early nineteenth-century British home and were shared by many consumers. Roger Hansford explores relationships between music produced in the early 1800s for domestic consumption and the fictional genre of romance, offering a new view of romanticism in British print culture. He surveys romance novels by Ann Radcliffe, Matthew Lewis, Sir Walter Scott, James Hogg, Edward Bulwer and Charles Kingsley in the period 1790–1850, interrogating the ways that music served to create mood and atmosphere, enlivened social scenes and contributed to plot developments. He explores the connections between musical scenes in romance fiction and the domestic song literature, treating both types of source and their intersection as examples of material culture. Hansford’s intersectional reading revolves around a series of imaginative figures – including the minstrel, fairies, mermaids, ghosts, and witches, and Christians engaged both in virtue and vice – the identities of which remained consistent as influence passed between the art forms. While romance authors quoted song lyrics and included musical descriptions and characters, their novels recorded and modelled the performance of songs by the middle and upper classes, influencing the work of composers and the actions of performers who read romance fiction.

The Gothic Romance Wave

Edward Jacobs, “Ann Radcliffe and Romantic Print Culture,” in Ann Radcliffe, Romanticism and the Gothic, ed. Dale Townshend and Angela Wright (New York: Cambridge University Press, 20 4), . 15. Franz Potter, The History of Gothic ...

The Gothic Romance Wave

"Late 1960s and early 1970s saw the birth of modern feminism, the sexual revolution, and strong growth in the mass-market publishing industry. Women made up a large part of the book market, and Gothic fiction became a popular staple. Gothics paved the way for contemporary fiction categories such as urban fantasy, paranormal romance, and vampire erotica"--

Embryology and the Rise of the Gothic Novel

The hybridity of Radcliffe's work appears not only in its very “Gothicness” as a marrying, per Walpole, of ancient and modern romances, but also in the interspersed poetry and her ... In Ann Radcliffe, Romanticism and the Gothic, ed.

Embryology and the Rise of the Gothic Novel

This book argues that embryology and the reproductive sciences played a key role in the rise of the Gothic novel in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. Diana Pérez Edelman dissects Horace Walpole’s use of embryological concepts in the development of his Gothic imagination and provides an overview of the conflict between preformation and epigenesis in the scientific community. The book then explores the ways in which Gothic literature can be read as epigenetic in its focus on internally sourced modes of identity, monstrosity, and endless narration. The chapters analyze Horace Walpole’s The Castle of Otranto; Ann Radcliffe’s A Sicilian Romance, The Italian, and The Mysteries of Udolpho; Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein; Charles Robert Maturin’s Melmoth the Wanderer; and James Hogg’s Confessions of a Justified Sinner, arguing that these touchstones of the Gothic register why the Gothic emerged at that time and why it continues today: the mysteries of reproduction remain unsolved.

Encountering Difference New Perspectives on Genre Travel and Gender

In Ann Radcliffe, Romanticism and the Gothic, edited by Dale Townshend and Angela Wright, 135–50. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. Garner, Michael. 2004. Romanticism and the Gothic: Genre, Reception, and Canon Formation.

Encountering Difference  New Perspectives on Genre  Travel and Gender

This edited collection poses crucial questions about the relationship between gender and genre in travel writing, asking how gender shapes formal and thematic approaches to the various generic forms employed to represent and recreate travel. While the question of the genre of travel writing has often been debated (is it a genre, a hybrid genre, a sub-genre of autobiography?), and recent years have been much attention to travel writing and gender, these have rarely been combined. This book sheds light on how the gendered nature of writing and reading about travel affect the genre choices and strategies of writers, as well as the way in which travel writing is received. It reconsiders traditional and frequently studied forms of travel writing, both European and non-European. In addition, it pursues questions about the connections between travel writing and other genres, such as the novel and films, minor forms including journalism and blogging, and new sub-genres such as the ‘new nature writing’; focusing in particular on the political ramifications of genre in travel writing. The collection is international in focus with discussions of works by authors from Europe, Asia, Australia, and both North and South America; consequently, it will be of great interest to scholars and historians in those regions.

York Notes Companions Gothic Literature

The volume surveys key debates such as Female Gothic, the Gothic narrator and nation and empire, and focuses on a wide range of texts including The Mysteries of Udolpho, Frankenstein, Jane Eyre, Dracula, The Magic Toyshop and The Shining.

York Notes Companions Gothic Literature

An exploration of Gothic literature from its origins in Horace Walpole’s 1764 classic The Castle of Otranto, through Romantic and Victorian Gothic to modernist and postmodernist takes on the form. The volume surveys key debates such as Female Gothic, the Gothic narrator and nation and empire, and focuses on a wide range of texts including The Mysteries of Udolpho, Frankenstein, Jane Eyre, Dracula, The Magic Toyshop and The Shining.

The Cambridge History of the Gothic Volume 2 Gothic in the Nineteenth Century

This second volume of The Cambridge History of the Gothic provides a rigorous account of the Gothic in British, American and Continental European culture, from the Romantic period through to the Victorian fin de siècle.

The Cambridge History of the Gothic  Volume 2  Gothic in the Nineteenth Century

This second volume of The Cambridge History of the Gothic provides a rigorous account of the Gothic in British, American and Continental European culture, from the Romantic period through to the Victorian fin de siècle. Here, leading scholars in the fields of literature, theatre, architecture and the history of science and popular entertainment explore the Gothic in its numerous interdisciplinary forms and guises, as well as across a range of different international contexts. As much a cultural history of the Gothic in this period as an account of the ways in which the Gothic mode has participated in the formative historical events of modernity, the volume offers fresh perspectives on familiar themes while also drawing new critical attention to a range of hitherto overlooked concerns. From Romanticism, to Penny Bloods, Dickens and even the railway system, the volume provides a compelling and comprehensive study of nineteenth-century Gothic culture.

The Cambridge Companion to Gothic Fiction

In this volume, fourteen world-class experts on the Gothic provide thorough and revealing accounts of this haunting-to-horrifying type of fiction from the 1760s (the decade of The Castle of Otranto, the first so-called 'Gothic story') to ...

The Cambridge Companion to Gothic Fiction

Gothic as a form of fiction-making has played a major role in Western culture since the late eighteenth century. In this volume, fourteen world-class experts on the Gothic provide thorough and revealing accounts of this haunting-to-horrifying type of fiction from the 1760s (the decade of The Castle of Otranto, the first so-called 'Gothic story') to the end of the twentieth century (an era haunted by filmed and computerized Gothic simulations). Along the way, these essays explore the connections of Gothic fictions to political and industrial revolutions, the realistic novel, the theatre, Romantic and post-Romantic poetry, nationalism and racism from Europe to America, colonized and post-colonial populations, the rise of film and other visual technologies, the struggles between 'high' and 'popular' culture, changing psychological attitudes towards human identity, gender and sexuality, and the obscure lines between life and death, sanity and madness. The volume also includes a chronology and guides to further reading.

Gothic Antiquity

Milbank, Alison, Ways of Seeing in Ann Radcliffe's Early Fiction: The Castles of Athlin and Dunbayne (1789) and A Sicilian Romance (1790)', in Ann Radcliffe, Romanticism and the Gothic, ed. Dale Townshend and Angela Wright (Cambridge: ...

Gothic Antiquity

Gothic Antiquity: History, Romance, and the Architectural Imagination, 1760-1840 provides the first sustained scholarly account of the relationship between Gothic architecture and Gothic literature (fiction; poetry; drama) in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. Although the relationship between literature and architecture is a topic that has long preoccupied scholars of the literary Gothic, there remains, to date, no monograph-length study of the intriguing and complex interactions between these two aesthetic forms. Equally, Gothic literature has received only the most cursory of treatments in art-historical accounts of the early Gothic Revival in architecture, interiors, and design. In addressing this gap in contemporary scholarship, Gothic Antiquity seeks to situate Gothic writing in relation to the Gothic-architectural theories, aesthetics, and practices with which it was contemporary, providing closely historicized readings of a wide selection of canonical and lesser-known texts and writers. Correspondingly, it shows how these architectural debates responded to, and were to a certain extent shaped by, what we have since come to identify as the literary Gothic mode. In both its 'survivalist' and 'revivalist' forms, the architecture of the Middle Ages in the long eighteenth century was always much more than a matter of style. Incarnating, for better or for worse, the memory of a vanished 'Gothic' age in the modern, enlightened present, Gothic architecture, be it ruined or complete, prompted imaginative reconstructions of the nation's past—a notable 'visionary' turn, as the antiquary John Pinkerton put it in 1788, in which Gothic writers, architects, and antiquaries enthusiastically participated. The volume establishes a series of dialogues between Gothic literature, architectural history, and the antiquarian interest in the material remains of the Gothic past, and argues that these discrete yet intimately related approaches to vernacular antiquity are most fruitfully read in relation to one another.

The Supernatural Explained in Ann Radcliffe s The Mysteries of Udolpho

Seminar paper from the year 2006 in the subject Didactics - English - Literature, Works, grade: 1,3, University of Münster, language: English, abstract: This brought to her [Emilys, jf] recollection the veiled picture, which had attracted ...

The Supernatural Explained in Ann Radcliffe s  The Mysteries of Udolpho

Seminar paper from the year 2006 in the subject English - Literature, Works, grade: 1,3, University of Münster, 19 entries in the bibliography, language: English, abstract: This brought to her [Emilys, jf] recollection the veiled picture, which had attracted her curiosity on the preceeding night, and she resolved to examine it. [...] She then hastily entered the chamber, and went towards the picture, which appeared to be enclosed in a frame of uncommon size, that hung in a dark part of the room. She paused again, and then, with a timid hand, lifted the veil; but instantly let it fall - perceiving that what it had concealed was no picture, and, before she could leave the chamber, she dropped senseless on the floor. Whatever Emily, the main character in Ann Radcliffe’s novelThe Mysteries of Udolpho,might have perceived behind that black veil will not be revealed for several hundred pages. The reader is left baffled as to what caused Emily all this pain and has to resort to guesswork, only to find out that she had simply seen a wax figure, shaped like a human being who was tortured to death. Ann Radcliffe has become famous for this method, that is for “a sequence of evasions and withdrawls, condluding with long-subsequent explanations.”2Radcliffe developed the technique of the so-called ‘supernatural explained’ and became famous for this device; a device that was well received in her times and made her one of the most famous novelists of her age. Several editions of her books and a 500 pound salary paid by her publisher George Robinson, an immense sum for the time, might be proof.3Nevertheless Radcliffe’s novels and her technique of the supernatural explained have been and still are heavily criticised, not only by modern literary critics. This term paper deals with Radcliffe’s method in her bookThe Mysteries of Udolpho.After a definition has been given the reception of Ann Radcliffe’s work throughout the decades will be discussed, before Terry Castle’s new approach “The Spectralization of the Other inThe Mysteries of Udolpho”will be introduced. Finally a conclusion will be drawn.