Antelopes

1.1 General introduction to Part 4 of the Antelope Survey This is the fourth and final part of the Antelope Specialist Group's Global Survey of Antelopes . Part 4 covers North Africa , the Middle East , and Asia and extends into the ...

Antelopes

Antelope herds numbering in the tens of thousands formerly occurred across the steppes and semideserts of Eurasia and India, but these have nearly all been reduced to fractions of their earlier size; antelope populations are now fragmented across the region, and during recent decades several species have disappeared altogether. Threats include hunting, loss of habitat, population fragmentation, inadequate protected area coverage, poorly-developed administrative structures, under-resourcing of conservation programmes, and lack of enforcement of existing legislation. Rising human population growth and economic development constantly increases pressure on land and natural resources. There is a consequent need for integrated rural development, and community-based conservation projects, which have the full participation of local people at the planning and execution stages.This publication, Part 4 of the Global Antelope Survey, covers 37 countries in the region, and actions to conserve antelope populations are listed in each country report.

African Antelope Database 1998

Rod East. Kingdon , J. 1979. East African mammals : An atlas of evolution in Africa . Vol . III , part B ( Large mammals ) ... In Antelopes : Global Survey & Regional Action Plans , part 4 : North Africa , the Middle East & Asia ; Mallon ...

African Antelope Database 1998

Although most antelope species still exist in large numbers in sub-Saharan Africa (some in hundreds of thousands), up to three-quarters of the species are in decline. Threats to their survival arise from the rapid growth of human and livestock populations, with consequent degradation and destruction of natural habitats, and excessive offtake by meat hunters. In addition, some parts of Africa are mow almost completely devoid of large wild animals because of uncontrolled slaughter during recent civil wars. This report presents the information currently held by the IUCN/SSC Antelope Specialist Group on the conservation status of each antelope species (and selected subspecies) in sub-Saharan Africa. Key areas have been identified for the conservation of representative antelope communities. While external donors make the greatest contributions to the conservation of antelopes, greater recognition of wildlife conservation in national and regional development plans is often a critically important requirement.

Global Register of Migratory Species

In : MALLON DP AND KINGSWOOD SC : Antelopes . Part 4 : North Africa , the Middle East , and Asia . Global Survey and regional action plans . SSC antelope specialist group . - Gland , Switzerland and Cambridge , UK .

Global Register of Migratory Species


El Kharafish

Desert animals in the eastern Sahara. ... Colloquium Africanum 4, Köln (Heinrich-Barth-Institut): 341–361. RIEMER, H., F. FÖRSTER, ... Global survey and regional action plans: Antelopes, part 4: North Africa, the Middle East, and Asia.

El Kharafish


Mammals of Africa Volume VI

Hippopotamuses, Pigs, Deer, Giraffe and Bovids Jonathan Kingdon ... Faune du Centre africain français (mammifères et oiseaux) (2nd edn). ... Part 4: North Africa, the Middle East, and Asia (eds D. P. Mallon & S. C. Kingswood).

Mammals of Africa  Volume VI

Mammals of Africa (MoA) is a series of six volumes which describes, in detail, every currently recognized species of African land mammal. This is the first time that such extensive coverage has ever been attempted, and the volumes incorporate the very latest information and detailed discussion of the morphology, distribution, biology and evolution (including reference to fossil and molecular data) of Africa's mammals. With more than 1,160 species and 16-18 orders, Africa has the greatest diversity and abundance of mammals in the world. The reasons for this and the mechanisms behind their evolution are given special attention in the series. Each volume follows the same format, with detailed profiles of every species and higher taxa. The series includes hundreds of colour illustrations and pencil drawings by Jonathan Kingdon highlighting the morphology and behaviour of the species concerned, as well as line drawings of skulls and jaws by Jonathan Kingdon and Meredith Happold. Every species also includes a detailed distribution map. Edited by Jonathan Kingdon, David Happold, Tom Butynski, Mike Hoffmann, Meredith Happold and Jan Kalina, and written by more than 350 authors, all experts in their fields, Mammals of Africa is as comprehensive a compendium of current knowledge as is possible. Extensive references alert readers to more detailed information. Volume VI, edited by Jonathan Kingdon and Michael Hoffmann, comprises a single order, currently subdivided into three suborders, containing the hippopotamuses, pigs, chevrotains, deer, Giraffe, Okapi, buffalos, spiral-horned antelopes, dwarf antelopes, duikers, grysboks, Beira, dik-diks, gazelles, Klipspringer, Oribi, reduncines, Impala, alcelaphines, horse-like antelopes, sheep and goats; the volume contains 98 species profiles.

Mammals of Africa

Antelopes: Global Survey and Regional Action Plans. Part 4: North Africa, the Middle East, and Asia. IUCN/ SSC Antelope Specialist Group. IUCN, Gland and Cambridge, viii + 260 pp. Mallon, D. P. & Kingswood, S. C. 2001b. Chapter 41.

Mammals of Africa

Mammals of Africa (MoA) is a series of six volumes which describes, in detail, every currently recognized species of African land mammal. This is the first time that such extensive coverage has ever been attempted, and the volumes incorporate the very latest information and detailed discussion of the morphology, distribution, biology and evolution (including reference to fossil and molecular data) of Africa's mammals. With 1,160 species and 16 orders, Africa has the greatest diversity and abundance of mammals in the world. The reasons for this and the mechanisms behind their evolution are given special attention in the series. Each volume follows the same format, with detailed profiles of every species and higher taxa. The series includes some 660 colour illustrations by Jonathan Kingdon and his many drawings highlight details of morphology and behaviour of the species concerned. Diagrams, schematic details and line drawings of skulls and jaws are by Jonathan Kingdon and Meredith Happold. Every species also includes a detailed distribution map. Extensive references alert readers to more detailed information. Volume I: Introductory Chapters and Afrotheria (352 pages) Volume II: Primates (560 pages) Volume III: Rodents, Hares and Rabbits (784 pages) Volume IV: Hedgehogs, Shrews and Bats (800 pages) Volume V: Carnivores, Pangolins, Equids and Rhinoceroses (560 pages) Volume VI: Pigs, Hippopotamuses, Chevrotain, Giraffes, Deer and Bovids (704 pages)

Ungulate Taxonomy

Relationships between eastern and southern African mammal faunas. In T.G. Bromage & F. Schrenk (eds.), African Biogeography ... North Africa, the Middle East, and Asia. Part 4 of Antelopes: Global Survey and Regional Action Plans ...

Ungulate Taxonomy

A well-reasoned synthesis, Ungulate Taxonomy will be a defining volume for years to come.

Antelope Conservation

In Antelopes. Part 4: North Africa, the Middle East, and Asia. Global survey and action plans: 55–62. Mallon, D. P. & Kingswood, S. C. (Compilers). Gland, Switzerland/ Cambridge: SSC Antelope Specialist Group, IUCN.

Antelope Conservation

Antelopes constitute a fundamental part of ecosystems throughout Africa and Asia where they act as habitat architects, dispersers of seeds, and prey for large carnivores. The fascication they hold in the human mind is evident from prehistoric rock paintings and ancient Egyptian art to today's wildlife documentaries and popularity in zoos. In recent years, however, the spectacular herds of the past have been decimated or extripated over wide areas in the wilds, and urgent conservation action is needed to preserve this world heritage for generations to come. As the first book dedicated to antelope conservation, this volume sets out to diagnose the causes of the drastic declines in antelope biodiversity and on this basis identify the most effective points of action. In doing so, the book covers central issues in the current conservation debate, especially related to the management of overexploitation, habitat fragmentation, disease transmission, climate change, populations genetics, and reintroductions. The contributions are authored by world-leading experts in the field, and the book is a useful resource to conservation scientists and practitioners, researchers, and students in related disciplines as well as interested lay people.

The Gazelle s Dream

In D.P. Mallon and S.C. Kingswood (eds), Antelopes. Part 4: North Africa, the Middle East, and Asia. Global survey and regional action plans: 93–8. SSC Antelope Specialist Group. Gland, Switzerland and Cambridge, UK: IUCN.

The Gazelle   s Dream

Once the world’s prairies, grasslands, steppes and tundra teemed with massive herds of game: gazelle, wild ass, bison, caribou and antelope. Humans seeking to hunt these large fast-moving herds devised a range of specialised traps that share many characteristics across all continents. Typically consisting of guiding walls or lines of stones leading to an enclosure or trap, game drives were designed for a mass killing. Construction of the game drive, organisation of the hunt and processing of the carcass often required group co-operation and in many cases game drives have been linked to seasonal gatherings of otherwise scattered groups, who may have used these occasions not only to hunt, but also for social, ritual and economic activities. The Gazelle’s Dream: Game Drives of the Old and New Worlds is the first comparative study of game drives, examining this mode of hunting across three continents and a broad range of periods. The book describes the hunting of bison in North America, reindeer in Scandinavia, antelope in Tibet and an extensive array of examples from the greater Middle East, from Egypt to Armenia. The Gazelle’s Dream will be of value to anyone with an interest in the history of hunting and wildlife management.

International Studbook Gazella Dama Mhorr

IUCN / SSC Antelope Specialist Group : 2 . East , R. ( 1999 ) . African Antelope Database 1998. ... Antelopes . Global Survey and Regional Action Plans . Part 4 : North Africa , the Middle East , and Asia . IUCN .

International Studbook Gazella Dama Mhorr

Las gacelas dama del Parque de Rescate de Fauna Sahariana (PRFS) de Almería pertenecen a la subespecie mhorr. Proceden de un grupo fundador que llegó del Sahara Occidental entre 1971 y 1975 y, desde el PRFS, se han distribuido a distintos zoológicos del mundo. Esta distribución se ha llevado a cabo en el marco de un Programa de Cría en Cautividad que procura garantizar al máximo la variación genética de los individuos y mantener, a la vez, un tamaño de población que asegure su viabilidad futura y la atención de potenciales demandas para proyectos de reintroducción. Este libro recoge la historia reproductiva de la población de gacela dama mhorr que se mantiene en cautividad desde 1971, tanto en el PRFS como en otras instituciones del mundo incluidas en el Programa de Cría en Cautividad, y pone a disposición de técnicos y científicos interesados en la conservación de esta especie la genealogía de estos individuos.

WILDLIFE BIOLOGY AN INDIAN PERSPECTIVE

Bombay Natural History Society, Mumbai, 1989. Rahmani, A.R., India. In: Mallon, D.P., and Kingswood, S.C. (Eds.), Antelopes. Part 4: North Africa, the Middle East, and Asia, Global Survey and Rgeional Action Plans, pp.

WILDLIFE BIOLOGY   AN INDIAN PERSPECTIVE

his book attempts to cover the whole gamut of wildlife in India portraying its different dimensions and conservation. Comprising thirteen chapters, the book is enriched with principles, theories, methods and tools of wildlife study, latest findings in Indian perspective including supportive data, and photographs of wildlife species in their natural habitat inclusive of colour plates. The chapters on ‘Wildlife tools and techniques’, ‘Special wildlife management programmes’ and ‘Wildlife legislations and initiatives’ will certainly attract special attention of the readers. The students who wish to pursue career in wildlife biology will be benefited with the book as it provides comprehensive understanding of the common field methods in wildlife research. The present text is a pioneer effort of the authors to fulfill the course requirement of undergraduate and postgraduate students of wildlife biology and zoology. The book will be equally valuable for the wildlife conservationists, academicians and those who are actively engaged in wildlife research.

Breaking the Logjam

Charles Kingswood, Antelopes: Global Survey and Regional Action Plans: Part 4, North Africa, the Middle East and Asia (Cambridge, U.K.: International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources, 2001), 1 74-75.

Breaking the Logjam

After several decades of significant but incomplete successes, environmental protection in the United States is stuck. Administrations under presidents of both parties have fallen well short of the goals of their environmental statutes. Schoenbrod, Stewart, and Wyman, distinguished scholars in the field of environmental law, identify the core problems with existing environmental statutes and programs and explain how Congress can fix them. Based on a project the authors led that incorporated the work of more than fifty leading environmental experts, this book is a call to action through public understanding based on a nonpartisan argument for smarter, more flexible regulatory programs to stimulate the economy and encourage green technology.

The Arabian Seas Biodiversity Environmental Challenges and Conservation Measures

In: Mallon DP, Kingswood SC (eds) Antelopes Part 4: North Africa, the Middle East, and Asia, Global survey and action plans. IUCN, Gland, pp 55–62 East R (1988) Antelopes global survey and regional action plans, Part 1: East and ...

The Arabian Seas  Biodiversity  Environmental Challenges and Conservation Measures

The Arabian Seas Marine Region encompasses marine areas from Djibouti to Pakistan, including the northern part of Somalia, the Red Sea, the Arabian/Persian Gulf, and parts of the Arabian Sea. Human pressures on the coastal and marine environments are evident throughout the region, and have resulted in harmful environmental effects. Oil and domestic, urban and industrial pollutants in several areas of this part of the world have caused local habitat degradation, eutrophication and algal blooms. Further, coastal landfill, dredging, and sedimentation, as well as nutrient and sediment runoff from phosphate mining, agriculture and grazing, and reduction in freshwater seepage due to groundwater extraction are all contributing to the degradation of coastal environments. This book discusses aspects not covered in other books on the region, which largely focus on marine biodiversity, and examines several environmental challenges that are often ignored, but which have a significant impact on the environment. Evaluating the status quo, it also recommends conservation measures and examines the abiotic factors that play a major main role in the environmental changes. Lastly, the book addresses the biodiversity of the area, providing a general context for the conservation and management measures discussed.

The Gnu s World

LEAT Research Report Series 4. Dar es Salaam: Lawyers' Environmental Action Team. Mallon, D.P., and S. C. Kingswood, eds. 2001. Antelopes: Part 4, North Africa, the Middle East, and Asia. Global Survey and Regional Action Plans.

The Gnu s World

This is the first scholarly book on the antelope that dominates the savanna ecosystems of eastern and southern Africa. It presents a synthesis of research conducted over a span of fifty years, mainly on the wildebeest in the Ngorongoro and Serengeti ecosystems, where eighty percent of the world’s wildebeest population lives. Wildebeest and other grazing mammals drive the ecology and evolution of the savanna ecosystem. Richard D. Estes describes this process and also details the wildebeest’s life history, focusing on its social organization and unique reproductive system, which are adapted to the animal’s epic annual migrations. He also examines conservation issues that affect wildebeest, including range-wide population declines.

Tigris and Euphrates Rivers Their Environment from Headwaters to Mouth

Mallon DP, Kingswood SC (2001) Antelopes. Part 4: North Africa, the Middle East, and Asia. IUCN, Gland, Switzerland, Global Survey and Regional Action Plans Matskási I (1980) Trematodes of bats in Iraq. Parasitologica Hungarica 13:7–12 ...

Tigris and Euphrates Rivers  Their Environment from Headwaters to Mouth

The system of the Tigris-Euphrates Rivers is one of the great river systems of southwestern Asia. It comprises the Tigris and Euphrates Rivers, which follow roughly parallel courses through the heart of the Middle East. The lower portion of the region that they run through is known as Mesopotamia, was one of the cradles of civilisation. There are several environmental factors that govern the nature of the two rivers and shape the landscape the two rivers running through. Geological events create rivers, climate monitor the water supply, the surrounding land influences the vegetation and the physical and chemical features of water. The Tigris-Euphrates system runs through the territory of four countries, Iraq, Iran, Turkey and Syria. Therefore, any scientific approach to the environment of these two rivers should include the natural history events in these countries. The book "Tigris and Euphrates Rivers: Their Environment from Headwaters to Mouth" will be divided into nine parts. These parts deal with the issues of the environment, the status of the flora and fauna, the abiotic aspects, ecology, hydrological regime of the two rivers, the biotic aspects. Water resources, stress of the environment, conservation issues. Since the book of Julian Rzoska "Euphrates and Tigris Mesopotamian Ecology and Destiny" in 1980, no book or major reference has been published that includes between its cover the facts and information that the present book will present. Therefore, the importance of the present book falls in stating the present status of the environment of the two rivers and the comparison of their environment between now and that of 37 years ago as given by J. Rzoska (1980). The recent studies showed that there are a large number of natural and political events that happened within the last three decades in the area of the Tigris-Euphrates river system that for sure have done a great change to the environment of the two rivers and consequently changing the biological and non-biological resources of the two rivers. This book will be a reference book to both Academic and students across the Middle East in different disciplines of knowledge to use in their researches on Tigris-Euphrates river system. The scholars interested in this area will use this book as a guide to compare this freshwater system with other areas in Asia and the world.

Equids zebras Asses and Horses

Antelopes . Part 4 : North Africa , the Middle East , and Asia . Global Survey and Regional Action Plans . Compiled by D.P. Mallon and S.C. Kingswood . IUCN / SSC Antelope Specialist Group , 2001 , viii + 260pp .

Equids  zebras  Asses  and Horses

The new Equid Action Plan provides current knowledge on the biology, ecology and conservation status of wild zebras, asses, and horses. It specifies what information is lacking, and prioritizes needed conservation actions. The Action Plan also provides chapters on equid taxonomy, genetics, reproductive biology, and population dynamics. These chapters highlight unsolved issues of taxonomy and genetics. They also provide information and insight into the special demographic and genetic challenges of managing small populations. The chapter on disease provides a review of documented equine disease and epidemiology and focuses on priorities for equid conservation health. The final chapter deals with the importance of developing an assessment methodology that explicitly considers the role of equids in ecosystems and the ecological processes that are necessary for ecosystem viability. The approach of combining ecological field studies and ecosystem modeling should prove useful for the scientific management and conservation of wild equids worldwide. These chapters provide research and conservation practitioners with new information and paradigms.

Search for the Golden Moon Bear

Antelopes, Part 4: North Africa, the Middle East and Asia: Global Survey and Regional Action Plans. Gland, Switzerland: IUCN, 2001. Maurice, A. People and Wildlife in and Around Saigon 1872–1873. Bangkok: White Lotus Press, 1997.

Search for the Golden Moon Bear

Documents the author's quest to discover the Southeast Asia golden moon bear, describing her team's encounters with dangerous elements, profiling her subject, and sharing excerpts from folklore and natural history.

Animals in the Ancient World from A to Z

Mallon, D. and Kingswood, S. (2001) Antelopes Part 4: North Africa, the Middle East, and Asia. Gland, Switzerland: IUCN. Manning, J. (2002–03) 'A Ptolemaic Agreement Concerning a Donkey with an Unusual Warranty Clause: The Strange Case ...

Animals in the Ancient World from A to Z

The ancient Greeks and Romans lived in a world teeming with animals. Animals were integral to ancient commerce, war, love, literature and art. Inside the city they were found as pets, pests, and parasites. They could be sacred, sacrificed, liminal, workers, or intruders from the wild. Beyond the city domesticated animals were herded and bred for profit and wild animals were hunted for pleasure and gain alike. Specialists like Aristotle, Aelian, Pliny and Seneca studied their anatomy and behavior. Geographers and travelers described new lands in terms of their animals. Animals are to be seen on every possible artistic medium, woven into cloth and inlaid into furniture. They are the subject of proverbs, oaths and dreams. Magicians, physicians and lovers turned to animals and their parts for their crafts. They paraded before kings, inhabited palaces, and entertained the poor in the arena. Quite literally, animals pervaded the ancient world from A-Z. In entries ranging from short to long, Kenneth Kitchell offers insight into this commonly overlooked world, covering representative and intriguing examples of mammals, reptiles, amphibians and invertebrates. Familiar animals such as the cow, dog, fox and donkey are treated along with more exotic animals such as the babirussa, pangolin, and dugong. The evidence adduced ranges from Minoan times to the Late Roman Empire and is taken from archaeology, ancient authors, inscriptions, papyri, coins, mosaics and all other artistic media. Whenever possible reasoned identifications are given for ancient animal names and the realities behind animal lore are brought forth. Why did the ancients think hippopotamuses practiced blood letting on themselves? How do you catch a monkey? Why were hyenas thought to be hermaphroditic? Was there really a vampire moth? Entries are accompanied by full citations to ancient authors and an extensive bibliography. Of use to Classics students and scholars, but written in a style designed to engage anyone interested in Greco-Roman antiquity, Animals in the Ancient World from A to Z reveals the extent and importance of the animal world to the ancient Greeks and Romans. It answers many questions, asks several more, and seeks to stimulate further research in this important field.

Desert Travel as a Form of Boasting

Mallon , D.P. & Kingswood , S.C. ( compilers ) , Antelopes . Part 4 : North Africa , the Middle East and Asia . Global Survey and Regional Action Plans , SSC Antelope Specialist Group . IUCN , Gland , Switzerland and Cambridge , 2001 .

Desert Travel as a Form of Boasting

Boasting about one's travels through the desert was a very common topic of self-praise in early Arabic poetry (ca. 500-750). Desert crossing would attest to a man's character, providing evidence of his valour, stamina, industriousness and ambition. The book focuses on desert travel as a self-praise theme in early Arabic poetry and especially in the work of the Umayyad poet Dur-Rumma (ca. 695-735), one of the last great exponents of the Bedouin poetic tradition. It discusses the various motifs associated with desert travel in Dur-Rumma and traces their antecedents in the work of earlier poets. By analyzing the diachronic development of the travel theme and evaluating its place within the poem as a whole, it challenges the widespread view of the Arabic ode (qasida) as a tripartite composition and contributes to a better understanding of early Arabic poetics. For despite the fact that desert travel was a central theme of early poetry, it has never been studied in detail and its purport as a theme of self-praise has not been generally recognized.