Arbella England s Lost Queen

Drawing on a wide variety of contemporary sources, Sarah Gristwood has painted a powerful and vivid portrait of a woman forced to carve a precarious path through the turbulent years when the Tudor gave way to the Stuart dynasty.

Arbella  England s Lost Queen

'It is Arbella they would proclaim Queen if her mistress should happen to die' Sir William Stanley, 1592 Niece to Mary, Queen of Scots, granddaughter to the great Tudor dynast Bess of Hardwick, Lady Arbella Stuart was brought up in the belief that she would inherit Elizabeth I's throne. Her very conception was dramatic: the result of an unsanctioned alliance that brought down the wrath of the authorities. Raised in restricted isolation at Hardwick, in the care - the 'custody' - of the forceful Bess, Arbella was twenty-seven before, in 1603, she made her own flamboyant bid for liberty. She may also have been making a bid for the throne. If so, she failed. But the accession of her cousin James thrust her into the colourful world of his court, and briefly gave her the independence she craved at the heart of Jacobean society. Then, aged thirty-five, Arbella risked everything to make her own forbidden marriage. An escape in disguise, a wild flight abroad and capture at sea led, in the end, to an agonizing death in the Tower in 1615. Along with the rumours about her sanity, her story influenced even Webster's The Duchess of Malfi. Yet perhaps nothing in her tale is as striking as the degree to which a woman so widely discussed in her own day has been written out of history. Nothing as remarkable as the almost modern freedom with which, in a series of extraordinary letters, Arbella Stuart revealed her own passionate and curiously accessible personality. Drawing on a wide variety of contemporary sources, Sarah Gristwood has painted a powerful and vivid portrait of a woman forced to carve a precarious path through the turbulent years when the Tudor gave way to the Stuart dynasty. But more remarkable still, the turmoils of Arbella's life never prevented her from claiming the right to love freely, to speak her wrongs loudly - and to control her own destiny.

In the Shadow of the Throne

Lady Arbella Stuart, once favoured heir to the throne of Elizabeth I, is one of England's forgotten princesses. Modern medical research has shown that she had porphyria. This book looks at her life and the influence of the disease.

In the Shadow of the Throne

Lady Arbella Stuart, once favoured heir to the throne of Elizabeth I, is one of England's forgotten princesses. Modern medical research has shown that she had porphyria. This book looks at her life and the influence of the disease.

Bess Of Hardwick

Q Gristwood, Arbella - England's Lost Queen, p.133. Q HMC: Cecil Papers, vol.
XIV, p.258. 21 : SHARPER THAN A SERPENT'S TOOTH 1 Gristwood, Arbella -
England's Lost Queen, p.135. 2 Steen, Letters of Lady Arbella Stuart, pp.120 et
seq.

Bess Of Hardwick

From the bestselling author of The Mitford Girls: A 'wonderfully researched' (Sunday Express) biography of Bess of Hartwick, the most powerful woman in England next to Queen Elizabeth Bringing 'the Tudor Age to exuberant life' (Hugh Massingberd, Mail on Sunday), Mary S. Lovell tells the story of Bess of Hardwick,, one of the most remarkable women of the Tudor era. Gently-born in reduced circumstances, she was married at 15 and when she was widowed at 16, she was still a virgin. At 19 she married a man more than twice her age, Sir William Cavendish, a senior auditor in King Henry VIII's Court of Augmentations. Responsible for seizing church properties for the crown during the Dissolution, Cavendish enriched himself in the process. During the reign of King Edward VI, Cavendish was the Treasurer to the boy king and sisters, and he and Bess moved in the highest levels of society. They had a London home and built Chatsworth House in Derbyshire. After Cavendish's death her third husband was poisoned by his brother. Bess' fourth marriage to the patrician George, 6th Earl of Shrewsbury, Earl Marshall of England, made Bess one of the most important women at court. Her shrewd business acumen was a byword, and she was said to have 'a masculine understanding', in that age when women had little education and few legal rights. The Earl's death made her arguably the wealthiest, and therefore - next to the Queen - the most powerful woman in the country. 'This wonderfully researched book is an intimate portrait of [Bess's] life and a vivid insight into life in Tudor society' Sunday Express

Arbella Stuart

Bingham, C., Darnley: A Life of Henry Stuart, Lord Darnley, Consort of Mary
Queen of Scots (Constable, 1995) Birch, T., ... Other Queen (Harper Collins, 2008
) Gristwood, S., Arbella: England's Lost Queen (Bantam Edition, 2004) Handover,
 ...

Arbella Stuart

The woman expected to succeed the Virgin Queen

The Politics of Female Alliance in Early Modern England

Caroline Bicks, Midwiving Subjects in Shakespeare's England (Burlington:
Ashgate, 2003), 33. See Arbella Stuart, The Letters of Lady Arbella Stuart, ed.
Sara Jayne Steen ... Gristwood, Arbella: England's Lost Queen, 284, 286.
Williams, Anne ...

The Politics of Female Alliance in Early Modern England

In the last thirty years scholarship has increasingly engaged the topic of women’s alliances in early modern Europe. The Politics of Female Alliance in Early Modern England expands our knowledge of yet another facet of female alliance: the political. Archival discoveries as well as new work on politics and law help shape this work as a timely reevaluation of the nature and extent of women’s political alliances. Grouped into three sections—domestic, court, and kinship alliances—these essays investigate historical documents, drama, and poetry, insisting that female alliances, much like male friendship discourse, had political meaning in early modern England. Offering new perspectives on female authors such as the Cavendish sisters, Anne Clifford, Aemilia Lanyer, and Katherine Philips, as well as on male-authored texts such as Romeo and Juliet, The Winter’s Tale, Swetnam the Woman-Hater, and The Maid’s Tragedy, the essays bring both familiar and unfamiliar texts into conversation about the political potential of female alliances. Some contributors are skeptical about allied women’s political power, while others suggest that such female communities had considerable potential to contain, maintain, or subvert political hierarchies. A wide variety of approaches to the political are represented in the volume and the scope will make it appealing to a broad audience.

Bess of Hardwick Empire Builder

Hardy, Arbella Stuart, p.125. Ibid., pp.126–7. ... Gristwood, ArbellaEngland's
Lost Queen, p.27. 3 Lodge, Illustrations ofBritish History, vol. II, p.73. (Original
now at College of Arms.) Nichols, A Progress of Queen Elizabeth, p.6. HMC:
Longleat ...

Bess of Hardwick  Empire Builder

"The best account yet available of this shrewd, enigmatic and remarkable woman."—Sunday Times [London] From the author of The Sisters, a chronicle of the most brutal, turbulent, and exuberant period of England's history. Bess Hardwick, the fifth daughter of an impoverished Derbyshire nobleman, did not have an auspicious start in life. Widowed at sixteen, she nonetheless outlived four monarchs, married three more times, built the great house at Chatsworth, and died one of the wealthiest and most powerful women in English history. In 1527 England was in the throes of violent political upheaval as Henry VIII severed all links with Rome. His daughter, Queen Mary, was even more capricious and bloody, only to be followed by the indomitable and ruthless Gloriana, Elizabeth I. It could not have been more hazardous a period for an ambitious woman; by the time Bess's first child was six, three of her illustrious godparents had been beheaded. Using journals, letters, inventories, and account books, Mary S. Lovell tells the passionate, colorful story of an astonishingly accomplished woman, among whose descendants are counted the dukes of Devonshire, Rutland, and Portland, and, on the American side, Katharine Hepburn.

Elizabeth s Bedfellows

An Intimate History of the Queen's Court Anna Whitelock ... Sarah, Arbella:
England's Lost Queen (London, 2003) ————Elizabeth and Leicester: Power,
Passion, Politics (London, 2007) Guilday, Peter, Catholic Refugees on the
Continent, ...

Elizabeth s Bedfellows

Elizabeth I acceded to the throne in 1558, restoring the Protestant faith to England. At the heart of the new queen's court lay Elizabeth's bedchamber, closely guarded by the favoured women who helped her dress, looked after her jewels and shared her bed. Elizabeth's private life was of public, political concern. Her bedfellows were witnesses to the face and body beneath the make-up and elaborate clothes, as well as to rumoured illicit dalliances with such figures as Robert Dudley. Their presence was for security as well as propriety, as the kingdom was haunted by fears of assassination plots and other Catholic subterfuge. For such was the significance of the queen's body: it represented the very state itself. This riveting, revealing history of the politics of intimacy uncovers the feminized world of the Elizabethan court. Between the scandal and intrigue the women who attended the queen were the guardians of the truth about her health, chastity and fertility. Their stories offer extraordinary insight into the daily life of the Elizabethans, the fragility of royal favour and the price of disloyalty.

Mistress of Hardwick

B.B.C. Television series.

Mistress of Hardwick


The Virgin Queen

Christopher Hibbert's Elizabeth I is a revelation--a genius and world leader, presiding over one of Europe's most glittering ages, singing, riding to the hunt, composing verse, summoning armadas, dealing coldly with traitors.

The Virgin Queen

An intimate portrait of history's most fascinating monarch. Christopher Hibbert's Elizabeth I is a revelation--a genius and world leader, presiding over one of Europe's most glittering ages, singing, riding to the hunt, composing verse, summoning armadas, dealing coldly with traitors. "A well-rounded and well-written study . . . an excellent introduction to a remarkable woman".--The Observer. Four-color insert.

Revenger

Books that have been especially helpful include Arbella Smart by P. M. Handover
; The Second Cecil by P. M. Handover; Robert, Earl of Essex by Robert Lacey;
Arbella: England 's Lost Queen by Sarah Gristwood; Palaces c'9' Progre.<.

Revenger

In his critically acclaimed debut thriller, Martyr, Rory Clements introduced readers to the unforgettable John Shakespeare, chief intelligencer to Queen Elizabeth I and older brother to Will. Now, five years later, the Queen needs Shakespeare’s services once more. Not only is England still at war with Spain, but her court is riven by savage infighting among ambitious young courtiers. Shakespeare is summoned by Elizabeth’s cold but deadly Privy Councillor Sir Robert Cecil and ordered to undertake two linked missions: to investigate the mystery of the doomed Roanoke colony in North America—Sir Walter Ralegh’s folly—and to spy on Cecil’s rival, the dashing Earl of Essex. Essex is the brightest star in the firmament, the Queen’s favorite. But when Shakespeare enters Essex’s dissolute world, he discovers not only that the Queen herself is in danger, but that he and his family are also targets. With a plague devastating the country, Catholics facing persecution and martyrdom at the hands of an infamous torturer, and John’s own wife, Catherine, possibly protecting a priest—Shakespeare has his own survival to secure, as well as that of his fading but still feisty Queen. Filled with the flavor and facts of a tumultuous time in English history, Revenger is a stunning novel of savage rivalries and reprisals from an author swiftly becoming a known master of historical suspense. From the Hardcover edition.

Lifewriting Annual

Biographical and Autobiographical Studies. Volume 1 Thomas R. Smith. Two
Renaissance Portraits Jacqueline Kolosov Sarah Gristwood . 2003 . Arbella :
England ' s Lost Queen . Boston : Houghton Mifflin . XXX pp . + xiv . Illus . David
Riggs .

Lifewriting Annual

AMS Press is pleased to announce the publication of the first volume of Lifewriting Annual, a yearly volume of critical and scholarly essays on lifewriting in all its forms - biography, autobiography, memoir, journals, diaries, letters, and works in media other than print. It publishes articles that describe and assess scholarly resources for biographical writing, especially collections of manuscripts and letters, and includes reviews of recently published biographies, autobiographies, and other works of life writing. The annual is a forum for the discussion of all aspects of lifewriting - theoretical, critical, and scholarly. Its broad scope will foster lively discussion of the ways that various forms of lifewriting inform each other. To promote that discussion, a section of Lifewriting Annual called Crossings is devoted to essays that blend biographical and autobiographical genres and those that combine such writing with other literary genres. auto/biographical writing resists and exceeds genre boundaries, Crossings provides a place for trying out new ideas and perhaps for creating novel forms of lifewriting.

Ordeal by Ambition

The story of Jane Seymour and two of her brothers, written by a direct descendant of the family.

Ordeal by Ambition

The story of Jane Seymour and two of her brothers, written by a direct descendant of the family.

The Spectator

280 , with his grandmother in Beirut ( the bank Queen Elizabeth insisted that
Mary should ISBN 0297848968 has faith in ... for its resonant exploration of much
concerned with watching and looksecurity , and Bess , too , appears to have loss
and ... Madeleine is the Brigitte disappear to throughout the Arbella Stuart , the
only offspring of this widow of the founder of a ... envisaged would one day rule
England , Line , one wall blown in , which can only What Madeleine asks is , what
might ...

The Spectator


Hardwick Hall Derbyshire

Presents a National Trust guidebook for visitors to National Trust Properties. This work covers history, horticulture, garden history, history of art, architecture, social history, natural environment, and conservation.

Hardwick Hall  Derbyshire

The National Trust cares for the finest collection of historic buildings, gardens, parks, landscape and coastline in the world. Its famous and well-respected series of guidebooks provides the essential companion to your visit and a lasting souvenir of the experience. And now you can buy the guide before your visit. Authoritative texts and superb illustrations illuminate the history of the place and tell the stories of the people who have lived and worked there. Every guidebook sold goes to help the work of the National Trust. If you want to learn more about the property, go to www.nationaltrust.org.uk

Emblems for a Queen

Swain , Needlework of Mary Queen of Scots , 1973 , p . 103 . 18 . Ibid . 19 . For
Arbella Stuart see Gristwood , Arbella : England ' s Lost Queen , 2003 . The letter
of 25 May 1611 , in which Arbella reports her sale of the embroideries to her aunt
 ...

Emblems for a Queen

A fascinating exploration of the emblems which persuaded Scotland's most famous queen to execute the most important surviving textiles in the history of European embroidery.

The Lady Penelope

The Lost Tale of Love and Politics in the Court of Elizabeth I Sally Varlow ... is My
Own , the Life of Mary Queen of Scots ( 2004 ) ; and on his cousin Arbella Stuart (
1575 – 1615 ) see S . Gristwood , Arbella , England ' s Lost Queen ( 2003 ) .

The Lady Penelope

Penelope Devereux was the brightest star who ever shone in the court of Queen Elizabeth I in 16th-century England, and this biography challenges the usual historians' view that she was merely a footnote to famous men's lives. The questions explored include: What political significance did she hold with her brother, Essex, and the Queen? Why did Essex name her as a major player in the coup that cost him his head, and how did she walk free? What was she doing having secret meetings with the most hunted Jesuit priest in England? Most important of all, if Mary Boleyn was her great-grandmother, was King Henry VIII her great-grandfather? Her life touched on every great event of the age?the execution of Mary Queen of Scots, the defeat of the Spanish Armada, the arrival of King James, and the Gunpowder Plot. She also knew many of the celebrated artistic figures of the day, including William Shakespeare. She was the most beautiful woman of her generation and muse to countless poets and musicians, yet she died in disgrace?a widow, outcast from court, and stripped of all her titles. Set against the character of Queen Elizabeth I and the staged pageantry of her Court, this dramatic and ultimately tragic story will have immediate appeal to all lovers of historical biographies.

Hamlet History and commentary

Throughout her life , and ever since , Arbella has often been spoken of as “
distracted ' or more seriously rumoured actually to be mad , ” Sarah Gristwood
explains in her recent biography , Arbella : England ' s Lost Queen . “ It is
tempting to ...

Hamlet  History and commentary

SUPERANNO New historical, scientific, and literary evidence suggests that Christopher Marlowe--London's leading playwright and a secret government agent--staged his death and composed Hamlet and other works in partnership with Shakespeare. Volume 1 includes the text of the play, parallels with Marlowe's earlier works, and a summary of the evidence for his role. Volume 2 recounts Marlowe's life, "death," and literary resurrection, explores his collaboration with Shakespeare, and analyzes the play, including resonances with the leading characters.

The Succession Bye and Main Plots of 1601 1603

Lady Arbella Stuart was also descended from Margaret of Scotland , like James
VI . ... Lady Norrington , In the shadow of the throne : the Lady Arbella Stuart ,
London 2001 ; Sarah Gristwood , Arbella , England ' s lost queen , London 2003 .

The Succession  Bye and Main Plots of 1601 1603

Notable rivals to King James VI and I were Sir Walter Ralegh, Baron Cobham and Lord Grey of Wilton. Only Henry Percy, Earl of Northumberland, was left over to be eliminated politically in the aftermath of the gunpowder plot. The first three rivals named were involved in two more plots, which are dealt with in detail.

Locating Privacy in Tudor London

The affair is made known to Elinor ' s sister , and F . J . thereafter grows
suspicious that Elinor has lost interest in him . ... Sarah Gristwood , Arbella :
England ' s Lost Queen ( London : Bantam , 2003 ) ; and Oxford DNB entries for
Elizabeth ...

Locating Privacy in Tudor London

Lena Orlin paints a dense picture of everyday life in Renaissance England, with an emphasis on personal privacy, the built environment, and the life story of a remarkable undiscovered woman - merchant's wife and mother of four, Alice Barnham - with a central role in some of the most important untold stories of sixteenth-century women.

Bibliographic Index

Bibliographic Index