Archaeology and the New Testament

A veteran archaeologist sheds light on the biblical text by examining archaeological discoveries.

Archaeology and the New Testament

A veteran archaeologist sheds light on the biblical text by examining archaeological discoveries.

The Archeology of the New Testament

Anyone concerned with the historical, geographical, and cultural background of the New Testament will want to study this classic work as it retraces the steps of Jesus. "The definitive handbook.

The Archeology of the New Testament

The Archeology of the New Testament is the authoritative illustrated account of what is presently known about the chief sites and monuments connected with the life of Jesus and the history of the early church. To follow the order of the New Testament, it first investigates sites connected with John the Baptist and then proceeds to Bethlehem and Nazareth, Samaria and Galilee, Jerash, Caesarea, Jericho, the Mount of Olives, Jerusalem, and Emmaus. Each site is illustrated, and the accompanying text, numbered to facilitate cross-reference, contains a bibliography. This edition has been completely revised to reflect the most recent scholarship and excavations, and it contains many new entries. Anyone concerned with the historical, geographical, and cultural background of the New Testament will want to study this classic work as it retraces the steps of Jesus. "The definitive handbook. Finegan's comprehensive treatment of almost every problem in the field of New Testament archeology as well as his judicious evaluation of the evidence makes this book indispensable to every serious student of the Bible."--The New York Times Book Review Originally published in 1993. The Princeton Legacy Library uses the latest print-on-demand technology to again make available previously out-of-print books from the distinguished backlist of Princeton University Press. These editions preserve the original texts of these important books while presenting them in durable paperback and hardcover editions. The goal of the Princeton Legacy Library is to vastly increase access to the rich scholarly heritage found in the thousands of books published by Princeton University Press since its founding in 1905.

The Archaeology Of The New Testament

Reicke, New Testament Era, p. 205. 25. A. Reifenberg, Ancient Jewish Coins (
Jerusalem: R. Mass, 3d éd., 1963), no. 136, pp. 27f., 57, pl. IX; Yaʼnkov
Meshorer, Jewish Coins of the Second Temple Period (Tel Aviv: Am Hassefer,
1967), no.

The Archaeology Of The New Testament

The Archeology of the New Testament is the authoritative illustrated account of what is presently known about the chief sites and monuments connected with the life of Jesus and the history of the early church. To follow the order of the New Testament, it first investigates sites connected with John the Baptist and then proceeds to Bethlehem and

New Testament Archaeology

An authoritative introduction to archaeology of New Testament times. Written by Dr John McRay, an acknowledged expert and who has hands-on experience of many 'digs' in Bible lands.

New Testament Archaeology

An authoritative introduction to archaeology of New Testament times. Written by Dr John McRay, an acknowledged expert and who has hands-on experience of many 'digs' in Bible lands.

Archaeology and the Bible

Traces biblical history from near the beginning of time to the NT era as archaeological finds testify to the reliability of the record.

Archaeology and the Bible

Traces biblical history from near the beginning of time to the NT era as archaeological finds testify to the reliability of the record.

Archaeology and the Old Testament

The text boasts over 250 illustrative items--charts, photographs, line drawings, and maps. Archaeological discoveries can shed a flood of light on the biblical text.

Archaeology and the Old Testament

Archaeological discoveries can shed a flood of light on the biblical text. This richly illustrated resource, now available in paperback, offers illuminating archaeological information related to the Old Testament. In this readable and accessible volume, Alfred Hoerth surveys the entire Old Testament, pointing out the relevant archaeological material and explaining how it enriches biblical studies. In an attempt to bridge the Old and New Testament worlds, he devotes the final chapter to an examination of the intertestamental period. The text boasts over 250 illustrative items--charts, photographs, line drawings, and maps.

Archaeology and the Old Testament

P O S T S CRIPT § LIKE SAUL, who had gone in search of his father's strayed
asses and found a kingdom, the archaeologist who went out to the lands of the
Bible found far more than he had expected. At most, the span of time covered by
the ...

Archaeology and the Old Testament

Archaeology is a science in which progress can be measured by the advances made backward into the past. The last one hundred years of archaeology have added a score of centuries to the story of the growth of our cultural and religious heritage, as the ancient world has been recovered from the sands and caves of the modern Near East-Egypt, Jordan, Israel, Syria, Lebanon, Turkey, and Iraq. Measured by the number of centuries which have been annexed to man's history in a relatively few years, progress has been truly phenomenal. This book deals with the recent advance and with those pioneers to the past who made it possible. Interest in biblical history has played an important part in this recovery. Names such as Babylon, Nineveh, Jericho, Jerusalem, and others prominent on the pages of the Bible, have gripped the popular imagination and worked like magic to gain support for excavations. This book is written from the widely shared conviction that the discovery of the ancient Near East has shed significant light on the Bible. Indeed, the newly-discovered ancient world has effected a revolution in the understanding of the Bible, its people, and their history. My purpose is to assess, in non-technical language which the layman can understand, the kind of change in viewing the biblical past which archaeology has brought about in the last century. Since the text of the Bible has remained constant over this period, it is obvious that any new light on its meaning must provide a better perspective for seeing the events which it describes. In short, I am concerned with the question, How has history as written in the Bible been changed, enlarged, or substantiated by the past century of the archaeological work?--from the Preface

Archaeology of the New Testament

Archaeology of the New Testament


The Popular Handbook of Archaeology and the Bible

In a user-friendly format written in popular style, they... examine the latest finds and explain their significance include dozens of photographs provide an instructive chart of artifacts (along with fast facts) sample a variety of ...

The Popular Handbook of Archaeology and the Bible

From two leading Christian apologists, here is a fascinating survey of the most important Old and New Testament archaeological discoveries through the ages. Biblical archaeology has always stirred excitement among believers and curiosity among unbelievers. The evidence dug up with a spade can speak volumes—and serve as a powerful testimony of the reliability of Scripture. Norm Geisler and Joe Holden have put together an impressive array of finds that confirm the biblical peoples and events of ages past. In a user-friendly format written in popular style, they... examine the latest finds and explain their significance include dozens of photographs provide an instructive chart of artifacts (along with fast facts) sample a variety of finds—papyri, inscriptions, scrolls, ossuaries, and more If readers are looking for just one book to cover this topic both concisely and comprehensively, this is it!

The Archeology of the New Testament The Mediterranean world of the early Christian apostles

This book is a pilgrimage to Palestine, undertaken for the same reasons that inspired Melito of Sardis in A.D. 160.

The Archeology of the New Testament  The Mediterranean world of the early Christian apostles

This book is a pilgrimage to Palestine, undertaken for the same reasons that inspired Melito of Sardis in A.D. 160. Christian leader and first pilgrim to the Holy Land, he sought out the places hallowed by the history of the early Church. With this book in hand, one may follow him, either in actuality or in imagination, "to learn by inquiry," as Origen expressed it, "of the footsteps of Jesus and of his earliest followers." The progress of this pilgrimage follows the order of the New Testament record. The author first investigates sites connected with John the Baptist and then proceeds to Bethlehem and Nazareth, Samaria and Galilee, Jerash, Caesarea, Jericho, the Mount of Olives, Jerusalem and Emmaus. In Jerusalem, the climactic site is reached at the Church of the Holy Sepulchre. Each site is illustrated and the accompanying text, numbered to facilitate cross-reference, contains a bibliography of the most important literature on the subject.

Archaeology and Bible History

Using Bible history as the unifying element rather than a topical approach, this book shows how archaeological discoveries in Bible lands have helped to confirm the accuracy of Scripture.

Archaeology and Bible History

Using Bible history as the unifying element rather than a topical approach, this book shows how archaeological discoveries in Bible lands have helped to confirm the accuracy of Scripture. The authors also deal with issues of Biblical interpretation and criticism not strictly archaeological in nature. Free's text has been updated and revised by Vos.

The Archaeology of the Bible

This work is an ideal introduction to the societies and events of the Ancient Near East and their relation to our interpretation of the Bible.

The Archaeology of the Bible

For the past 200 years archaeological work has provided new information that allows us to peer into the past and open chapters of human history that have not been read for centuries, or even millennia. In The Archaeology of the Bible James K. Hoffmeier provides the reader with an incisive account of archaeology's role in shaping our understanding of the biblical texts.Fundamental issues addressed throughout include how archaeological discoveries relate to biblical accounts, and the compatibility of using scientific disciplines to prove or disprove a religious book such as the Bible. This work is an ideal introduction to the societies and events of the Ancient Near East and their relation to our interpretation of the Bible.

The Old Testament and the Archaeologist

Although the impact of this new knowledge on biblical matters is briefly surveyed, the main concern of this book is with the methods that archaeologists use in going about their work.

The Old Testament and the Archaeologist

The recovery of the history of the ancient Near East through archaeology is one of the major achievements of the modern age. Although the impact of this new knowledge on biblical matters is briefly surveyed, the main concern of this book is with the methods that archaeologists use in going about their work. Lance discusses the principles of excavation and how materials recovered are brought to bear on biblical studies. The book explains in detail the principles of stratigraphy and typology, suggests practical ways for the beginner to find needed information in the confusing array of primary and secondary publications, and takes a brief look at the future of biblical archaeology as a discipline.

The Old Testament in Archaeology and History

Eighteen international authorities contribute chapters to this introductory volume.

The Old Testament in Archaeology and History

One hundred and fifty years of sustained archaeological investigation has yielded a more complete picture of the ancient Near East. The Old Testament in Archaeology and History combines the most significant of these archaeological findings with those of modern historical and literary analysis of the Bible to recount the history of ancient Israel and its neighboring nations and empires. Eighteen international authorities contribute chapters to this introductory volume. After exploring the history of modern archaeological research in the Near East and the evolution of "biblical archaeology" as a discipline, this textbook follows the Old Testament's general chronological order, covering such key aspects as the exodus from Egypt, Israel's settlement in Canaan, the rise of the monarchy under David and Solomon, the period of the two kingdoms and their encounters with Assyrian power, the kingdoms' ultimate demise, the exile of Judahites to Babylonia, and the Judahites' return to Jerusalem under the Persians along with the advent of "Jewish" identity. Each chapter is tailored for an audience new to the history of ancient Israel in its biblical and ancient Near Eastern setting. The end result is an introduction to ancient Israel combined with and illuminated by more than a century of archaeological research. The volume brings together the strongest results of modern research into the biblical text and narrative with archaeological and historical analysis to create an understanding of ancient Israel as a political and religious entity based on the broadest foundation of evidence. This combination of literary and archaeological data provides new insights into the complex reality experienced by the peoples reflected in the biblical narratives.