The Archaeology of Violence

It has taken a while, but the possibility now emerges of achieving an aim given voice some years ago: that of “the development of a 'voice' for archaeology ...

The Archaeology of Violence

Interdisciplinary study of the role of violence in the Mediterranean and Europe.

Interpreting Archaeology

... the contemporary relevance of historical archaeology . There is a distinct AfricanAmerican voice ; it can be heard ; and it may or may not be critical .

Interpreting Archaeology

Covers the ways in which material culture is understood and preserved in museums and how the nature of history is itself in flux.

Routledge Handbook of the Archaeology of Indigenous Colonial Interaction in the Americas

Lima (1993, 228), for instance, states that historical archaeology began “to give voice to ethnic minorities and subaltern, oppressed, disadvantaged, ...

Routledge Handbook of the Archaeology of Indigenous Colonial Interaction in the Americas

The Routledge Handbook of the Archaeology of Indigenous-Colonial Interaction in the Americas brings together scholars from across the hemisphere to examine how archaeology can highlight the myriad ways that Indigenous people have negotiated colonial systems from the fifteenth century through to today. The contributions offer a comprehensive look at where the archaeology of colonialism has been and where it is heading. Geographically diverse case studies highlight longstanding theoretical and methodological issues as well as emerging topics in the field. The organization of chapters by key issues and topics, rather than by geography, fosters exploration of the commonalities and contrasts between historical contingencies and scholarly interpretations. Throughout the volume, Indigenous and non-Indigenous contributors grapple with the continued colonial nature of archaeology and highlight Native perspectives on the potential of using archaeology to remember and tell colonial histories. This volume is the ideal starting point for students interested in how archaeology can illuminate Indigenous agency in colonial settings. Professionals, including academic and cultural resource management archaeologists, will find it a convenient reference for a range of topics related to the archaeology of colonialism in the Americas.

Indigenous Archaeology

He told me that he felt that American Indians do have a voice, and that they should exercise that voice to be certain that archaeologists have the data to ...

Indigenous Archaeology

Watkins' book is an important contribution in the contemporary public debates in public archaeology, applied anthropology, cultural resources management, and Native American studies.

Presenting Archaeology to the Public

One is that of an Abanaki Indian ( rather than the voice of " the " Abanaki Indian ) . Common questions that archaeologists hear from Indians are , " Why do ...

Presenting Archaeology to the Public

In the face of increasing public interest and demand for information, archaeologists are collaborating with historians, museum curators, and exhibit designers to devise the best strategies for translating archaeological information to the public. This book opens doors for public involvement. It highlights successful case studies in which specialists have provided with the opportunity and necessary tools for learning about archaeology. Little Big Horn, Sabino Canyon, Monticello, and Poplar Forest are just a few of the historical sites featured.

Theatre Archaeology

voice. to. the. past. The haunting past is an issue of embodiment. Significantly, these sites and structures enhance the voice: channelling its effects, ...

Theatre Archaeology

Theatre/Archaeology is a provocative challenge to disciplinary practice and intellectual boundaries. It brings together radical proposals in both archaeological and performance theory to generate a startlingly original and intriguing methodological framework.

Archaeology After Structuralism

The authors take the role of experts, summarising and explaining to the reader the meaning of Freud, Derrida, Foucault. The Introduction is the voice of ...

Archaeology After Structuralism

Most practising archaeologists have preferred to leave the deep theories of what lies behind their methods and perceptions on one side. Now archaeologists have faced up to the difficult task of making (or not making) the connections between the past, interpretation and the present. The writers of this volumes address the problems of archaeology, sometimes warily and sometimes with enthusiasm. The connections are not easy to accomplish: a great deal of theory seems of little relevance to the everyday practice of archaeology, and much of post-structuralism refers exclusively back to itself rather than to the more specific concerns of a historical discipline. But where the junction between post-structuralism and archaeology can be made, the results are innovative and enriching. Originally published in 1990.

Bridging the Gap in Maritime Archaeology Working with Professional and Public Communities

It is the willingness to learn and test new means of communication that will create a successful voice for archaeology over the multitudes of websites vying ...

Bridging the Gap in Maritime Archaeology  Working with Professional and Public Communities

Proceedings of a conference session held at CIfA 2014. The session focused on ways in which it is possible to engage with a wider audience in the course of maritime archaeological work. Papers offer a series of case studies exhibiting best practice with regard to individual maritime projects and examples of outreach to local communities.

Proceedings of the Society of Biblical Archaeology

Society of Biblical Archæology (London, England). for him the ... And while the
disciples were marvelling , behold , they heard a voice from the cloud , saying "
This is My beloved Son in whom I am well pleased , hear Him . ” ( 28 ) [ peea ]
And ...

Proceedings of the Society of Biblical Archaeology


The Future of the Past

Archaeologists, Native Americans, and Repatriation Tamara L. Bray. orate verbal game" (Abrams 1988:137). Voice contains and uses the author's values, ...

The Future of the Past

To date, the notion of repatriation has been formulated as a highly polarized debate with museums, archaeologists, and anthropologists on one side, and Native Americans on the other. This volume offers both a retrospective and a prospective look at the topic of repatriation. By juxtaposing the divergent views of native peoples, anthropologists, museum professionals, and members of the legal profession, it illustrates the complexity of the repatriation issue.

Archaeology of The Teufelsberg

The operational unit included two voice operators who were each equipped with the then new Eddystone 770 receivers for monitoring Mercury Grass ...

Archaeology of The Teufelsberg

For over 50 years, the white radomes of the Teufelsberg have been one of Berlin’s most prominent landmarks. For half of this time the city lay over 100 miles behind an 'Iron Curtain' that divided East from West, and was surrounded by communist East Germany and the densest concentration of Warsaw Pact military forces in Europe. From the vantage point high on the Teufelsberg, British and American personnel constantly monitored the electronic emissions from the surrounding military forces, as well as high-level political intelligence. Today, the Teufelsberg stands as a contemporary and spectacular ruin, representing a significant relic of a lost cyber space of Cold War electronic emissions and espionage. Based on archaeological fieldwork and recently declassified documents, this book presents a new history of the Teufelsberg and other Western intelligence gathering sites in Berlin. At a time when intelligence gathering is once more under close scrutiny, when questions are being asked about the intelligence relationship between the United States and Russia, and amidst wider debate about the US’s National Security Agency (NSA) intelligence programmes, sites like the Teufelsberg raise questions that appear both important and timely.

The Foundations of Cognitive Archaeology

3.2.1 The Inner Voice and Inner Ear Cognitive psychologists often metaphorically refer to subvocalization as an “inner voice” and the phonological buffer as ...

The Foundations of Cognitive Archaeology

An empirically supported proposal for synthesizing multiple approaches to the study of the mind in the past. In The Foundations of Cognitive Archaeology, Marc Abramiuk proposes a multidisciplinary basis for the study of the mind in the past, arguing that archaeology and the cognitive sciences have much to offer one another. Abramiuk draws on relevant topics from philosophy, biological anthropology, cognitive psychology, cognitive anthropology, and archaeology to establish theoretically founded and empirically substantiated principles of a discipline that integrates different approaches to mind-related archaeological research. Abramiuk discusses the two ways that archaeologists have traditionally viewed the human mind: as a universal or as a relative interface with the environment. He argues that neither view by itself can satisfactorily serve as a basis for gleaning insight into all aspects of the mind in the past and, therefore, the mind is more appropriately studied using multiple approaches. He explains the rationale for using these approaches in mind-related archaeological research, reviewing the literature in both cognitive psychology and cognitive anthropology on human memory, perception, and reasoning. Drawing on archaeological and genetic evidence, Abramiuk investigates the evolution of the mind through the Upper Paleolithic era—when the ancient mind became functionally comparable to the modern human mind. Finally, Abramiuk offers a model for the establishment of a discipline dealing with the study of the mind in the past that integrates all the approaches discussed.

Report on the Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology Harvard University

As he stood thus , a gentle breeze scemed to touch him softly , and he thought
that he heard something like a human voice . He started to move away , but again
he heard the voice , this time more distinctly . He listened ; the voice grew clearer
 ...

Report on the Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology  Harvard University


Annual Report of the Trustees of the Peabody Museum of American Archaeology and Ethnology

Peabody Museum of American Archaeology and Ethnology. the pole towards the
east ( fig ... As he stood thus , a gentle breeze scemed to touch him softly , and he
thought that he heard something like a human voice . He started to move away ...

Annual Report of the Trustees of the Peabody Museum of American Archaeology and Ethnology


Archaeology and Capitalism

It contributes to paternalistic endeavors, in which archaeological practice is conceived as being a way to give subaltern groups a voice.

Archaeology and Capitalism

The editors and contributors to this volume focus on the inherent political nature of archaeology and its impact on the practice of the discipline. Pointing to the discipline’s history of advancing imperialist, colonialist, and racist objectives, they insist that archaeology must rethink its muted professional stance and become more overtly active agents of change. The discipline is not about an abstract “archaeological record” but about living individuals and communities, whose lives and heritage suffer from the abuse of power relationships with states and their agents. Only by recognizing this power disparity, and adopting a political ethic for the discipline, can archaeology justify its activities. Chapters range from a critique of traditional ethical codes, to examinations of the capitalist motivations and structures within the discipline, to calls for an engaged, emancipatory archaeology that improves the lives of the people with whom archaeologists work. A direct challenge to the discipline, this volume will provoke discussion, disagreement, and inspiration for many in the field.

Singing Archaeology

Illuminates the aesthetics of a major American composer.

Singing Archaeology

Illuminates the aesthetics of a major American composer.

Media Archaeology

From a similar perspective, the media-archaeological development period of ... of the physically real within and outside the recorded voice (intonations, ...

Media Archaeology

“Huhtamo and Parikka, from the first and second generations of media archaeology, have brought together the best writings from almost all of the best authors in the field. Whether we speak of cultural materialism, media art history, new historicism or software studies, the essays compiled here provide not only an anthology of innovative historical case studies, but also a methodology for the future of media studies as material and historical analysis. Media Archaeology is destined to be a key handbook for a new generation of media scholars.” —Sean Cubitt, author of The Cinema Effect "Taken together, this excellent collection of essays by a wide range of scholars and practitioners demonstrates how the emerging field of media archaeology not only excavates the ways in which newer media work to remediate earlier forms and practices but also sketches out how older media help to premediate new ones." —Richard Grusin, author of Premediation: Affect and Mediality after 9/11 “In Media Archaeology, a constellation of interdisciplinary writers explore society’s relationship with the technological imaginary through history, with fascinating essays on influencing machines, Freud as media theorist, interactive games from the 19th century to the present day, just to name a few. As an artist, my mind is set on fire by discussions of the marvelous inventions that never made it to the mainstream, such as optophonic poetry, Christopher Strachey’s 1952 ‘Love letter generator’ for the Manchester Mark II computer, and the ‘Baby talkie.’” —Zoe Beloff, artist and editor of The Coney Island Amateur Psychoanalytic Society and Its Circle "A long-awaited synthesis addressing media archaeology in all of its epistemological complexity. With wide-ranging intellectual breath and creative insight, Huhtamo and Parikka bring together an eminent array of international scholars in film and media studies, literary criticism, and history of science in the spirit of making the discourse of the humanities legible to artist-intellectuals. This foundational volume enables a sophisticated understanding of reproducible audiovisual media culture as apparatus, historical form, and avant-garde space of play." —Peter J. Bloom, author of French Colonial Documentary: Mythologies of Humanitarianism "An essential read for everyone interested in the histories of media and art." —Oliver Grau, author of MediaArtHistories "Media archaeology is a wonderful new shadow field. If you are willing to step outside the glow of new media, this book's approaches can shift how you experience the objects and experiences that fill the new everyday of contemporary life. No one captures the beauty of studying new media in the shadow of older media implements and practices better than Erkki Huhtamo, the Finnish writer, curator, and scholar of media technology and design famous for his creative work as a preservationist and an interpreter of pre-cinematic technologies of visual display. He has teamed up here with Jussi Parikka, the Finnish scholar who has brought us an insect theory of media, to give us this long-awaited collection of essays in media archaeology. The surprise of the book is that the essays collectively bring forward a range of approaches to considering archaeological practice, giving us new ways to think about our embodied and subjective orientations to technologies and objects through the lens of the material remnants of practice, rather than offering a narrow definition of the field. The collection moves between computational machines and influencing machines, preservation and imagination, offering a range of ways to live the new everyday of media experience through the imaginary of archaeology." —Lisa Cartwright, co-author of Practices of Looking: An Introduction to Visual Culture “Where McLuhan’s Understanding Media ends, Media Archaeology actually begins. Refusing the often futile search for the eternal laws of media, Media Archaeology does something more difficult and rare. It literally brings the history of media alive by drawing into presence the enigmatic, heterogeneous, unruly past of the media—its artifacts, machines, imaginaries, tactics, and games. What results is a fabulous cabinet of (media) memories: the imaginary moving with kinetic frenzy, histories of what happens when media collide in the electronic space of the virtual, and stories about those strange interstitial spaces between analogue and digital.” —Arthur Kroker, author of The Will to Technology and the Culture of Nihilism “Rupturing the continuities and established values of traditional media history, this exciting and thought-provoking collection makes a significant contribution to our understanding of media culture, and demonstrates that the presence of the past in present-day media is central to the recognition and re-cognition that media archaeology promotes.” —John Fullerton, editor of Screen Culture: History and Textuality “Here, at last, is a collection of essays that are a critical step to comprehending the history of our impulse to see ourselves in the machines we have made. This could be the beginning of 'Archaeology of Intention.'" —Bernie Lubell, artist “Huhtamo and Parikka’s expertly curated collection is a kaleidoscopic tour of media archaeology, giving us forceful evidence of that unruly domain’s vitality while preserving its wonderful unpredictability. With this essential volume, countless new paths have been opened up for media and cultural historians." —Charles R. Acland, author of Screen Traffic “This brilliant collection of essays provides much needed material and historical grounding for our understanding of new media. At the same time, it animates that ground by recognizing the integral roles that imagination, embodiment, and even productive disturbance play in media historiography. Yet these essays constitute more than a collection of historical case studies; together, they transform the book’s subject into its overall method. Media Archaeology performs media archaeology. Huhtamo and Parikka excavate the intellectual traditions and map the epistemological terrain of media archaeology itself, demonstrating that the field is ripe with possibilities not only for further historical examination, but also for imagining exciting new scholarly and creative futures.” —Shannon Mattern, The New School