Arguing about Disability

This pioneering collection is divided into three sections covering definitions and theories of disability; disabled people in society and applied ethics.

Arguing about Disability

Disability is a thorny and muddled concept - especially in the field of disability studies - and social accounts contest with more traditional biologically based approaches in highly politicized debates. Sustained theoretical scrutiny has sometimes been lost amongst the controversy and philosophical issues have often been overlooked in favour of the sociological. Arguing about Disability fills that gap by offering analysis and debate concerning the moral nature of institutions, policy and practice, and their significance for disabled people and society. This pioneering collection is divided into three sections covering definitions and theories of disability; disabled people in society and applied ethics. Each contributor – drawn from a wide range of academic backgrounds including disability studies, sociology, psychology, education, philosophy, law and health science – uses a philosophical framework to explore a central issue in disability studies. The issues discussed include personhood, disability as a phenomenon, social justice, discrimination and inclusion. Providing an overview of the intersection of disability studies and philosophical ethics, Arguing about Disability is a truly interdisciplinary undertaking. It will be invaluable for all academics and students with an interest in disability studies or applied ethics, as well as disability activists.

Prenatal Testing and Disability Rights

Some would go farther , arguing that disability makes one part of a community or
culture , and that identification with that culture is as important to identity as being
a member of a race or ethnic group . Erik Parens has characterized the position ...

Prenatal Testing and Disability Rights

As prenatal tests proliferate, the medical and broader communities perceive that such testing is a logical extension of good prenatal care—it helps parents have healthy babies. But prenatal tests have been criticized by the disability rights community, which contends that advances in science should be directed at improving their lives, not preventing them. Used primarily to decide to abort a fetus that would have been born with mental or physical impairments, prenatal tests arguably reinforce discrimination against and misconceptions about people with disabilities. In these essays, people on both sides of the issue engage in an honest and occasionally painful debate about prenatal testing and selective abortion. The contributors include both people who live with and people who theorize about disabilities, scholars from the social sciences and humanities, medical geneticists, genetic counselors, physicians, and lawyers. Although the essayists don't arrive at a consensus over the disability community's objections to prenatal testing and its consequences, they do offer recommendations for ameliorating some of the problems associated with the practice.

Encyclopedia of Disability

Historically, the two social categories of race and disability have had a
contentious relationship. Race theorists have sought to distance ... what bodies
should be or do.” Both perspectives argue that race and disability are relational
concepts.

Encyclopedia of Disability

SAGE Reference is proud to announce the five-volume Encyclopedia of Disability. This encyclopedia represents the first attempt to bring an authoritative reference resource to the many faces of disability. More than 500 world-renowned scholars have written over 1,000 entries —in a clear, accessible style—with the desire to bring all students, researchers, and interested readers closer to the daily experience of disability. Volumes 1 - 4 cover disability A to Z, including a reader's guide, comprehensive bibliography, and index. Volume 5 contains a wealth of primary source documents in the field of disability. The Encyclopedia of Disability is a must-have reference for all academic libraries, large public libraries, and any social science, medical, legal, or governmental reference collections. Non-governmental organizations, charitable foundations, and law firms will also want to add this set to their collections.

Disability in the Middle Ages

This model has a clear role to play in disability activism, as it focuses attention on
society's obligation to provide ways of eliminating disability rather than allowing
disability to be seen as natural and unchangeable. By arguing that disability is ...

Disability in the Middle Ages

What do we mean when we talk about disability in the Middle Ages? This volume brings together dynamic scholars working on the subject in medieval literature and history, who use the latest approaches from the field to address this central question. Contributors discuss such standard medieval texts as the Arthurian Legend, The Canterbury Tales and Old Norse Sagas, providing an accessible entry point to the field of medieval disability studies to medievalists. The essays explore a wide variety of disabilities, including the more traditionally accepted classifications of blindness and deafness, as well as perceived disabilities such as madness, pregnancy and age. Adopting a ground-breaking new approach to the study of disability in the medieval period, this provocative book will interest medievalists and scholars of disability throughout history.

Arguing about the World

human development and disability while at the same time observing that the
human development literature has not gone far in championing the cause ofthe
disabled in the way that it has championed gender justice (Harriss-White, 1996
and ...

Arguing about the World

Meghnad Desai is Professor Emeritus of Economics at the LSE. He is founder of LSE Global Governance. From 1990-1995 he was Director of LSE's Development Studies Institute and has been at the LSE for over 30 years. In 1991, Meghnad Desai was created Lord Desai of St Clement Danes. His latest book is Marx's Revenge: The Resurgence of Capitalism and the Death of Statist Socialism. By enabling leading scholars and other public figures to explore the subjects that inspired them and Lord Desai, the publication will offer a fascinating exploration of progress on economics, human rights and development issues. The initiative identifies the continuing contribution made by Lord Desai, and the development of the themes highlighted by his work. Topics covered include: Econometric modelling, Macro economics and monetary theory, Development, Inequality, poverty and famines, Marx and political economy, Globalisation and global governance, History of economic ideas, and Nationalism in South Asia. Contributors include: Robert Skidelsky, Charles Goodhart, David Hendry, John Harriss, Purna Sen and others.

Critical Theory and Disability

Disability & Society 14, 3 (1999): 353–67. Riis, Soren. ... “What disability civil
rights cannot do: employment and political economy.” Disability ... “Disability and
the thinking body,” in Arguing About Disability: Philosophical Perspectives, eds.

Critical Theory and Disability

Critical Theory and Disability explores social and ontological issues encountered by present-day disabled people, applying ideas from disability studies and phenomenology. It focuses on disabling contexts in order to highlight and criticize the ontological assumptions of contemporary society, particularly those related to the meaning of human being. In empirical terms, the book explores critically social practices that undermine disabled people's well being, drawing on cases from contemporary Bulgaria. It includes in-depth examination of key mechanisms such as disability assessment, personal assistance (direct payments) and disability-based discrimination. On this basis, wider sociological and ontological claims are made concerning the body, identity, otherness, and exclusion.

Arguing for Access

The daily, public work of access involves developing and deploying complex verbal and embodied strategies for countering deficit discourses and reconfiguring normative relations to motivate and teach interdependence.

Arguing for Access

Arguing for Access: Everyday Rhetorical Labor of Disability theorizes rhetoric of public engagement from the lived communicative experiences of people who are blind and visually impaired. Through semi-structured rhetorical life history interviews with nineteen people who are blind and visually impaired and rhetorical analysis of first-person narratives produced for a community-writing project, I investigate how people learn and use literate and rhetorical practices for public engagement with disability. The daily, public work of access involves developing and deploying complex verbal and embodied strategies for countering deficit discourses and reconfiguring normative relations to motivate and teach interdependence. I call this daily demand for rhetorical activity everyday rhetorical labor of disability, and I explore how it manifests in three contexts: professional, informational, and social. In professional contexts, my analysis demonstrates how what I call normative workplace commonplaces shape arguments about work and working bodies and construct barriers to access for workers with disabilities. In informational contexts, I show how what I call technological commonplaces shape claims about who uses which technologies, for what purposes, where, when, and how, creating the need for rhetorical labor from users of adaptive tools of information access. In social life, my analysis demonstrates how participants must deploy a rhetorical pedagogy of interdependence to teach non-normative ways of moving and thinking about humanness, responsibility, agency, and community. Taken together, my analysis of participant rhetorical experience in these three contexts reveals real social, emotional, and material consequences of everyday rhetorical labor of disability. Access fatigue, a phenomenon observed in the data, points to the lived consequences of such demands, demonstrating how the constant demand for rhetorical self-invention and pedagogy affects individuals' sense of self and depletes their energy for the rhetorical pursuit of access and inclusion. Ultimately, Arguing for Access provides empirical evidence of the lived consequences of a logic of individual rhetorical responsibility for justice and offers conceptual frameworks for examining other lived rhetorical experiences of difference.

Pension and Employee Benefits Preambles to final and temporary regulations

... disability claimants , took an providing disability benefits that are administered
opposite position , arguing that disability providers by boards of trustees or
committees meeting at frequently delay resolving these claims unneces least
quarterly ...

Pension and Employee Benefits  Preambles to final and temporary regulations


Implementing Culture Change in Long Term Care

This paradigm moves the locus of barrier away from the person with the
impairment or disability and transfers it to the ... People with disabilities have
increasingly championed the “de-medicalization” of disability, arguing that
disability is in ...

Implementing Culture Change in Long Term Care

"As one who is involved in the culture change movement and is trying to review the huge volume of available resources, I find it refreshing to have a book that draws it all together....I highly recommend this book to administrators who are overwhelmed at the thought of implementing change in their environment. The author has done an excellent job of making it seem quite possible to make culture change a reality."--Doody's Medical Reviews "The publication of Implementing Culture Change in Long-Term Care marks the beginning of a new era in the aging services profession. This book is the Rosetta Stone of the culture change movement. Dr. Jurkowskiís skillful blend of theory, research, and practice addresses the movementís most urgent needs and makes the work of culture change advocates accessible to a broader and more influential audience....This book is the future in paper and ink." From the Foreword by Bill Thomas, MD Founder of the Eden Alternative and the Green House Project This text offers a strategic approach for promoting an active culture of change in long-term care facilities for older adults and people with disabilities. It discusses the philosophical framework for the delivery of care in these settings and addresses the changing landscape of our long-term care population. With the aim of transforming these facilities from institutional settings to person-centered, homelike environments, the book offers administrators and practitioners numerous strategies and benchmarks for culture change, and addresses tools and resources to support the culture change process. The text describes how these benchmarks have been met and provides ways to address not just knowledge, but also attitudes and behavior, important components of a culture change strategy. The book compares and contrasts current long-term care paradigmsóthe medical model, the rehabilitation paradigm, the independence and dignity model, and strength-based approachesóin order to see how they facilitate or impede culture change. It provides best practice examples of benchmarks to be attained along with strategies to promote this process. These benchmarks and strategies are based upon the Artifacts for Culture Change Assessment Tool developed by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid. The text describes ways to build a blueprint and strategic processes for integrating these benchmarks into a long-term care setting, addressing the entire process from assessment through evaluation. It also provides tools enabling readers to learn from their own process via a feedback loop, and includes strategies to facilitate partnerships with family, staff, and community. Key Features: Elucidates benchmarks that can be implemented in long-term care settings, using the Centers for Medicare/Medicaid's "Long Term Care Artifacts" assessment tool as an intervention Focuses on care practices, the environment, the inclusion and integration of family and community, leadership benchmarks, and workplace practices Includes robust examples of best practices within each of the main artifact arenas Incorporates tools and strategies for assessing the philosophical paradigm of a long- term facility that can help or hinder the culture change process Provides discussion and reflection questions and websites for additional resources

The Disability Studies Reader

And, most importantly, as I will argue, disability may turn out to be the identity that
links other identities, replacing the notion of postmodernism with something I
want to call “dismodernism.” I am arguing that disability can be seen as the ...

The Disability Studies Reader

The Fourth Edition of the Disability Studies Reader breaks new ground by emphasizing the global, transgender, homonational, and posthuman conceptions of disability. Including physical disabilities, but exploring issues around pain, mental disability, and invisible disabilities, this edition explores more varieties of bodily and mental experience. New histories of the legal, social, and cultural give a broader picture of disability than ever before. Now available for the first time in eBook format 978-0-203-07788-7.

Queering Fat Embodiment

They further argue that not only is impairment is entangled with culture and social
structure, but that oppression is both political and embodied as pain and suffering
. Many disability scholars argue that impairment, and particularly its ...

Queering Fat Embodiment

Cultural anxieties about fatness and the attendant stigmatisation of fat bodies, have lent a medical authority and cultural legitimacy to what can be described as ’fat-phobia’. Against the backdrop of the ever-growing medicalisation, pathologisation, and commodification of fatness, coupled with the moral panic over an alleged ’obesity epidemic’, this volume brings together the latest scholarship from various critical disciplines to challenge existing ideas of fat and fat embodiment. Shedding light on the ways in which fat embodiment is lived, experienced, regulated and (re)produced across a range of cultural sites and contexts, Queering Fat Embodiment destabilises established ideas about fat bodies, making explicit the intersectionality of fat identities and thereby countering the assertion that fat studies has in recent years reproduced a white, ableist, heteronormative subjectivity in its analyses. A critical queer examination on fatness, Queering Fat Embodiment will be of interest to scholars of cultural and queer theory, sociology and media studies, working on questions of embodiment, stigmatisation and gender and sexuality.

Receiving the Gift of Friendship

Profound Disability, Theological Anthropology, and Ethics Hans S. Reinders.
tween cultures, and it ... group of people in society. In contrast, proponents of “
identity politics” argue that disability may be a source of positive identification as
well.

Receiving the Gift of Friendship

Does what we are capable of doing define us as human beings? If this basic anthropological assumption is true, where can that leave those with intellectual disabilities, unable to accomplish the things that we propose give us our very humanity? Hans Reinders here makes an unusual claim about unusual people: those who are profoundly disabled are people just like the rest of us. He acknowledges that, at first glance, this is not an unusual claim given the steps taken within the last few decades to bring the rights of those with disabilities into line with the rights of the mainstream. But, he argues, that cannot be the end of the matter, because the disabled are human beings before they are citizens. "To live a human life properly," he says, "they must not only be included in our institutions and have access to our public spaces; they must also be included in other people's lives, not just by natural necessity but by choice." Receiving the Gift of Friendship consists of three parts: (1) Profound Disability, (2) Theology, and (3) Ethics. Overturning the "commonsense" view of human beings, Reinders's argument for a paradigm shift in our relation to people with disabilities is founded on a groundbreaking philosophical-theological consideration of humanity and of our basic human commonality. Moreover, Reinders gives his study human vividness and warmth with stories of the profoundly disabled from his own life and from the work of Jean Vanier and Henri Nouwen in L'Arche communities.

Embodied Selves

Neitherassumption is tenable in the context of impairment and disability: (1)
because of thelackofknowledge on the part of ... Thestrong social model attempts
toseverthe link between embodiment and disability by arguing that disability is
not.

Embodied Selves

This interdisciplinary collection explores the role the body plays in constituting our sense of self, signalling the interplay between material embodiment, social meaning, and material and social conditions.

Disability and Social Theory

'Inciting Legal Fictions: Disability's Date with Ontology and the Ableist Body of
Law'. Griffith Law Review10 (1), ... Kristiansen, T. Shakespeare and S. Vehmas (
eds), Arguing about Disability: Philosophical Perspectives. London: Routledge.

Disability and Social Theory

This comprehensive, interdisciplinary collection, examines disability from a theoretical perspective, challenging views of disability that dominate mainstream thinking. Throughout, social theories of disability intersect with ideas associated with sex/gender, race/ethnicity, class and nation.

Arts and Humanities

Disability studies: Enabling the humanities. New York, NY: ... The ontology of
disability and impairment: A discussion of the natural and social features. ... T.
Shakespeare (Eds.), Arguing about disability: Philosophical perspectives (pp. 42
–56).

Arts and Humanities

This volume in The SAGE Reference Series on Disability explores the arts and humanities within the lives of people with disabilities. It is one of eight volumes in the cross-disciplinary and issues-based series, which incorporates links from varied fields making up Disability Studies as volumes examine topics central to the lives of individuals with disabilities and their families. With a balance of history, theory, research, and application, specialists set out the findings and implications of research and practice for others whose current or future work involves the care and/or study of those with disabilities, as well as for the disabled themselves. The presentational style (concise and engaging) emphasizes accessibility. Taken individually, each volume sets out the fundamentals of the topic it addresses, accompanied by compiled data and statistics, recommended further readings, a guide to organizations and associations, and other annotated resources, thus providing the ideal introductory platform and gateway for further study. Taken together, the series represents both a survey of major disability issues and a guide to new directions and trends and contemporary resources in the field as a whole.

Disability Across the Developmental Life Span

... 2006) expressed the same viewpoint, that all women should have the right to
abortion. However, Hubbard believes that pressuring women to have an abortion
solely on the basis of a disability is wrong. To say again, I am not arguing against
 ...

Disability Across the Developmental Life Span

This is the only text to provide comprehensive coverage of human growth and development, a requirement mandated by the Council of Rehabilitation Education (CORE) for a master's degree in rehabilitation counseling and for Licensed Professional Counselor certification. Written by an eminent leader in the field of disability studies, this book reflects a significant change in perceptions of individuals with disabilities from being defined foremost by their disability to being viewed as normal individuals with a disability. It provides an understanding of traditional human growth and development that will enhance the practice of disability counseling by enabling an understanding of a client's childhood and prior life experiences. The book begins with a focus on developmental theories and tasks, followed by a discussion of cultural and ethical considerations in human development. It considers the major theories of human development as they relate to people with and without disabilities, and career theories with a focus on the concept of choice. The book addresses specific developmental stages including a description of developmental tasks, risks, disability applications, specific disabilities common to a particular stage, and cultural and ethical issues, all supported by case examples. Key Features: Fulfills the required CORE mandated course on human growth and development and the disability experience Addresses disability across the lifespan in relation to developmental stages Authored by highly a respected expert in disability studies

Dimensions of Human Behavior

The social model of disability emphasizes the barriers that people with
impairments face as they interact with the physical and social world, arguing that
disability is a result of the relationship between the individual and the
environment (see ...

Dimensions of Human Behavior

In this text, you will meet social workers and clients from a variety of work settings and situations who bring the passion and power of social work to life through engaging case studies found throughout the text. These case studies help apply the latest theory and research to real life practice situations. The Third Edition offers new case studies and is thoroughly updated and revised to reflect recent census data, developing trends, and cutting-edge research on human behavior.

Psychosocial Aspects of Disability

The primary argument has been that most persons with disabilities and the
elderly would rather live at home with personal assistance than in a nursing
home. The issue is at least 20 years old and continues to be fought on many
battlefronts, ...

Psychosocial Aspects of Disability

"What a marvelous and amazing textbook. Drs. Marini, Glover-Graf and Millington have done a remarkable job in the design of this highly unique book, that comprehensively and very thoughtfully addresses the psychosocial aspects of the disability experience. These highly respected scholars have produced a major work that will be a central text in rehabilitation education for years to come." From the Foreword by Michael J. Leahy, Ph.D., LPC, CRC Office of Rehabilitation and Disability Studies Michigan State University "This is an excellent book, but the best parts are the stories of the disabled, which give readers insights into their struggles and triumphs." Score: 94, 4 Stars--Doody's Medical Reviews What are the differences between individuals with disabilities who flourish as opposed to those who never really adjust after a trauma? How are those born with a disability different from individuals who acquire one later in life? This is the first textbook about the psychosocial aspects of disability to provide students and practitioners of rehabilitation counseling with vivid insight into the experience of living with a disability. It features the first-person narratives of 16 people living with a variety of disabling conditions, which are integrated with sociological and societal perspectives toward disability, and strategies for counseling persons with disabilities. Using a minority model perspective to address disability, the book focuses on historical perspectives, cultural variants regarding disability, myths and misconceptions, the attitudes of special interest and occupational groups, the psychology of disability with a focus on positive psychology, and adjustments to disability by the individual and family. A wealth of counseling guidelines and useful strategies are geared specifically to individual disabilities. Key Features: Contains narratives of people living with blindness, hearing impairments, spinal cord injuries, muscular dystrophy, polio, mental illness, and other disabilities Provides counseling guidelines and strategies specifically geared toward specific disabilities, including "dos and don'ts" Includes psychological and sociological research relating to individual disabilities Discusses ongoing treatment issues and ethical dilemmas for rehabilitation counselors Presents thought-provoking discussion questions in each chapter Authored by prominent professor and researcher who became disabled as a young adult

Education and HIV AIDS

This is the final argument presented in this book: if we are to promote education
as a humanitarian response to HIV/AIDS, we need to have a healthy debate over
the usefulness of the term ... I am not arguing that HIV/AIDS is in fact a “disability.

Education and HIV AIDS

Education and HIV/AIDS draws together contributors with expertise in HIV/AIDS and education working around the world, including Sub-Saharan Africa, Southeast Asia, Europe, the USA and the Caribbean, from a variety of perspectives. Contributors explore the changing nature of education in light of this epidemic, as well as the impact of public health issues on educational institutions, in a range of different contexts. Within each chapter, the contributors pull apart a variety of relationships HIV/AIDS has with education; some provide a comparative analysis of global responses and international politics, others use small case studies to explore how local culture and tradition impacts these issues. Each chapter contains a summary of the key points and issues within each chapter to enable easy navigation, key contemporary questions to encourage active engagement with the material and references to seminal texts and cutting-edge research to prompt further reading and discussion.

Addressing Ableism

questions apart) seems to indicate identifying disabilities as relative to certain
kinds of objectives and natural facts—which is ... She asserts as much in arguing
disability as a “neutral feature” out of the mere-difference view of disability (78–79
).

Addressing Ableism

Addressing Ableism is a set of philosophical meditations outlining the scale and scope of ableism. By explicating concepts like experience, diagnosis, precariousness, and prosthesis, Scuro maps out the institutionalized and intergenerational forms of this bias as it is analogous and yet also distinct from other kinds of dehumanization, discrimination, and oppression. This project also includes a dialogical chapter on intersectionality with Devonya Havis and Lydia Brown, a philosopher and writer/activist respectively. Utilizing theorists like Judith Butler, Tobin Siebers, Emmanuel Levinas, and Hannah Arendt to address ableism, Scuro thoroughly critiques the neoliberal culture and politics that underwrites ableist affections and phobias. This project exposes the many material and non-material harms of ableism, and it offers multiple avenues to better confront and resist ableism in its many forms. Scuro provides crucial insights into the many uninhabitable and unsustainable effects of ableism and how we might revise our intentions and desires for the sake of a less ableist world.