As Long as the Sun Shines and Water Flows

As Long as the Sun Shines and Water Flows: A Reader in Canadian Native Studies, edited by Ian A. L. Getty and Antoine S. Lussier 2. Indian Education in Canada, Volume 1, The Legacy, edited by Jean Barman, Yvonne Hébert, ...

As Long as the Sun Shines and Water Flows

This collection of papers focuses on Canadian Native history since 1763 and presents an overview of official Canadian Indian policy and its effects on the Indian, Inuit, and Metis. Issues and themes covered include colonial Indian policy, constitutional developments, Indian treaties and policy, government decision-making and Native responses reflecting both persistence and change, and the broad issue of aboriginal and treaty rights.

As Long as the Sun Shines and Water Flows

A series of research papers on the history of native peoples (Indian, Inuit, Metis) in Canada, presented at a Native Studies colloquium at Brandon University, Manitoba in 1981.

As Long as the Sun Shines and Water Flows

A series of research papers on the history of native peoples (Indian, Inuit, Metis) in Canada, presented at a Native Studies colloquium at Brandon University, Manitoba in 1981. Includes a bibliographic essay on the Indian in Canadian historical writing.

Subjects Citizens and Others

... and the Canadian Indian Department, 1874–1893', in I.A.L. Getty and A.S. Lussier (eds), As Long as the Sun Shines and Water Flows: A Reader in Canadian Native Studies (Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press, 1983), 107.

Subjects  Citizens  and Others

Bosnian Muslims, East African Masai, Czech-speaking Austrians, North American indigenous peoples, and Jewish immigrants from across Europe—the nineteenth-century British and Habsburg Empires were characterized by incredible cultural and racial-ethnic diversity. Notwithstanding their many differences, both empires faced similar administrative questions as a result: Who was excluded or admitted? What advantages were granted to which groups? And how could diversity be reconciled with demands for national autonomy and democratic participation? In this pioneering study, Benno Gammerl compares Habsburg and British approaches to governing their diverse populations, analyzing imperial formations to reveal the legal and political conditions that fostered heterogeneity.

Under Served

“As Long as the Sun Shines and Water Flows: An Historical Comment.” In As Long as the Sun Shines and Water Flows: A Reader in Canadian Native Studies, edited by Ian A. L. Getty and Antoine S. Lussier, 1–26. Vancouver: UBC Press.

Under Served

In this edited collection, academics, heath care professionals, and policy-makers examine the historical, political, and social factors that influence the health and health care of Indigenous, inner-city, and migrant populations in Canada. This crucial text broadens traditional determinants of health—social, economic, environmental, and behavioural elements—to include factors like family and community, government policies, mental health and addiction, disease, homelessness and housing, racism, youth, and LGBTQ that heavily influence these under-served populations. With contributions from leading scholars including Dennis Raphael, this book addresses the need for systemic change both in and outside of the Canadian health care system and will engage students in health studies, nursing, and social work in crucial topics like health promotion, social inequality, and community health.

A Narrow Vision

David T. McNab, "Herman Merivale and Colonial Ofiice Indian Policy in the MidNineteenth Century," in Ian A.L. Getty and Antoine S. Lussier, eds, As Long as the Sun Shines and Water Flows (Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press, ...

A Narrow Vision

In A Narrow Vision, Brian Titley chronicles Scott's career in the Department of Indian Affairs and evaluates developments in Native health, education, and welfare between 1880 and 1932. He shows how Scott's response to challenges such as the making of treaties in northern Ontario, land claims in British Columbia, and the status of the Six Nations caused persistent difficulties and made Scott's term of office a turbulent one. Scott could never accept that Natives had legitimate grievances and held adamantly to the view that his department knew best.

Aboriginal and Treaty Rights in Canada

As long as the sun shines and the water flows . [ This the father used to say . ) Consequently , the negotiators figured that they had finished their business then.'28 The treaty commissioner accepted that the treaty would be concluded ...

Aboriginal and Treaty Rights in Canada

Contains eight essays redressing bias in the Canadian legal system against Indigenous peoples, discussing recent court decisions, current legal and cultural theory, and newly discovered historical information. Of particular note are data relevant to a better understanding of the political and legal relations established by treaty and the Royal Proclamation of 1763. Other topics include the definition of Aboriginal rights, and the privileging of written over oral testimony in litigation. Annotation copyrighted by Book News, Inc., Portland, OR

Severing the Ties that Bind

Ottawa: The Indian Association of Alberta, 1981. McCaskill, Don. “Native People and the Justice System.” In As Long as the Sun Shines and Water Flows: A Reader in Canadian Native Studies, edited by Ian Getty and Antoine ...

Severing the Ties that Bind

Religious ceremonies were an inseparable part of Aboriginal traditional life, reinforcing social, economic, and political values. However, missionaries and government officials with ethnocentric attitudes of cultural superiority decreed that Native dances and ceremonies were immoral or un-Christian and an impediment to the integration of the Native population into Canadian society. Beginning in 1885, the Department of Indian Affairs implemented a series of amendments to the Canadian Indian Act, designed to eliminate traditional forms of religious expression and customs, such as the Sun Dance, the Midewiwin, the Sweat Lodge, and giveaway ceremonies.However, the amendments were only partially effective. Aboriginal resistance to the laws took many forms; community leaders challenged the legitimacy of the terms and the manner in which the regulations were implemented, and they altered their ceremonies, the times and locations, the practices, in an attempt both to avoid detection and to placate the agents who enforced the law.Katherine Pettipas views the amendments as part of official support for the destruction of indigenous cultural systems. She presents a critical analysis of the administrative policies and considers the effects of government suppression of traditional religious activities on the whole spectrum of Aboriginal life, focussing on the experiences of the Plains Cree from the mid-1880s to 1951, when the regulations pertaining to religious practices were removed from the Act. She shows how the destructive effects of the legislation are still felt in Aboriginal communities today, and offers insight into current issues of Aboriginal spirituality, including access to and use of religious objects held in museum repositories, protection of sacred lands and sites, and the right to indigenous religious practices in prison.

Circles of Time

In Ian A.L. Getty and Antoine S. Lussier, eds., As Long as the Sun Shines and Water Flows: A Reader in Canadian Native Studies, pp. 104-19. Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press, 1983. Long, John S. ''Archdeacon Thomas Vincent ...

Circles of Time

Documents the experiences of Aboriginal people, their history and recent negotiations in Ontario, providing insight into the historiography of the treaty-making process in the last 25 years.

Canadian Failures

See J.S. Milloy, “The Early Indian Acts: Developmental Strategy and Constitutional Change,” in As Long as the Sun Shines and Water Flows, eds. Getty and Lussier, 56–54; and Indian Act Colonialism: A Century Of Dishonour, 1869–1969, ...

Canadian Failures

The Hill Times: Best Books of 2017 Successful Canadians write about failure, and how it got them where they are today. What does it mean to fail? To some of the most successful Canadians, it was a rite of passage, a stepping stone to greater things, or even a brilliant source of inspiration. Olympic golds, successful businesses, pioneering medical advances — all came about after a series of missteps and countless attempts. Canadian Failures gathers ten experts from the private, public, and not-for-profit sectors and academia, all of whom have grappled with failures and success throughout their lives. Their powerful argument: that Canada, and Canadians, must be willing to learn from failure if we hope to succeed. With Chapters By ... astronaut Robert Thirsk Olympic gold medalist, wrestler Erica Wiebe Chair of OpenText and of the National Research Council, Tom Jenkins co-founder of the Just for Laughs comedy festival, Andy Nulman ... and others at the top of their fields.

From Time Immemorial

In As Long as the Sun Shines and Water Flows: A Reader in Canadian Native Studies. Ed. Ian A. L. Getty and Antoine S. Lussier. Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press. Pp. 288–298. McClelland. David C. 1961 The Achieving Society ...

From Time Immemorial

Around the globe, people who have lived in a place "from time immemorial" have found themselves confronted by and ultimately incorporated within larger state systems. During more than three decades of anthropological study of groups ranging from the Apache to the indigenous peoples of Kenya, Richard J. Perry has sought to understand this incorporation process and, more importantly, to identify the factors that drive it. This broadly synthetic and highly readable book chronicles his findings. Perry delves into the relations between state systems and indigenous peoples in Canada, the United States, Mexico, and Australia. His explorations show how, despite differing historical circumstances, encounters between these state systems and native peoples generally followed a similar pattern: invasion, genocide, displacement, assimilation, and finally some measure of apparent self-determination for the indigenous people—which may, however, have its own pitfalls. After establishing this common pattern, Perry tackles the harder question—why does it happen this way? Defining the state as a nexus of competing interest groups, Perry offers persuasive evidence that competition for resources is the crucial factor in conflicts between indigenous peoples and the powerful constituencies that drive state policies. These findings shed new light on a historical phenomenon that is too often studied in isolated instances. This book will thus be important reading for everyone seeking to understand the new contours of our postcolonial world.

The Nature of Empires and the Empires of Nature

30 See George Stanley, “As Long as the Sun Shines and Water Flows: An Historical Comment,” in As Long as the Sun Shines and Water Flows: A Reader in Canadian Native Studies, ed. Ian Getty and Antoine Lussier (Vancouver: University of ...

The Nature of Empires and the Empires of Nature

Drawing on themes from John MacKenzie’s Empires of Nature and the Nature of Empires (1997), this book explores, from Indigenous or Indigenous-influenced perspectives, the power of nature and the attempts by empires (United States, Canada, and Britain) to control it. It also examines contemporary threats to First Nations communities from ongoing political, environmental, and social issues, and the efforts to confront and eliminate these threats to peoples and the environment. It becomes apparent that empire, despite its manifestations of power, cannot control or discipline humans and nature. Essays suggest new ways of looking at the Great Lakes watershed and the peoples and empires contained within it.

National Identity and the Conflict at Oka

146 Thomas Flanagan, “Louis Riel and Aboriginal Rights,” As Long as the Sun Shines and Water Flows: A Reader in Canadian Native Studies, eds. Ian Getty and Antoine Lussier, foreword by Chief John Snow (Vancouver: University of British ...

National Identity and the Conflict at Oka

Through readings of literature, canonical history texts, studies of museum displays and media analysis, this work explores the historical formation of myths of Canadian national identity and then how these myths were challenged (and affirmed during the 1990 standoff at Oka. It draws upon history, literary criticism, anthropology, studies in nationalism and ethnicity and post-colonial theory.

Seen but Not Seen

The quotation by Lord Dorchester is cited in John S. Long, Far Northern Ontario in 1905 (Montreal and Kingston: ... 158 George F.G. Stanley, “As Long as the Sun Shines and Water Flows: An Historical Comment,” in Ian A.L. Getty and ...

Seen but Not Seen

Based on decades of extensive archival research, Seen but Not Seen uncovers a great swath of previously-unknown information about settler-Indigenous relations in Canada.

No Place for Fairness

As Long as the Sun Shines and the Water Flows. Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press, 1983. MacKenzie, John M. Empires ofNature and the Nature ofEmpires: Imperialism, Scotland and the Environment. East Linton: Tuckwell Press, ...

No Place for Fairness

Examining the Bear Island land claim case as a benchmark in Aboriginal land rights and land policy.

Who Controls the Hunt

6 Douglas Leighton, “A Victorian Civil Servant at Work: Lawrence Vankoughnet and the Canadian Indian Department, 1874–1893,” in Gettey and Lussier, As Long as the Sun Shines and Water Flows, ed. Ian A.L. Getty and Antoine S. Lussier ...

Who Controls the Hunt

As the nineteenth century ended, the popularity of sport hunting grew and Ontario wildlife became increasingly valuable. Restrictions were imposed on hunting and trapping, completely ignoring Anishinaabeg hunting rights set out in the Robinson Treaties of 1850. Who Controls the Hunt? examines how Ontario's emerging wildlife conservation laws failed to reconcile First Nations treaty rights and the power of the state. David Calverley traces the political and legal arguments prompted by the interplay of treaty rights, provincial and dominion government interests, and the corporate concerns of the Hudson’s Bay Company. A nuanced examination of Indigenous resource issues, the themes of this book remain germane to questions about who controls the hunt in Canada today.

A National Crime

In As Long as the Sun Shines and Water Flows, edited by I. Getty and A. Lussier. Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press, 1983. Leslie, J. Vision Versus Revision: Native People, Government Officials, and the Joint Senate/House ...

A National Crime

“I am going to tell you how we are treated. I am always hungry.” — Edward B., a student at Onion Lake School (1923) "[I]f I were appointed by the Dominion Government for the express purpose of spreading tuberculosis, there is nothing finer in existance that the average Indian residential school.” — N. Walker, Indian Affairs Superintendent (1948) For over 100 years, thousands of Aboriginal children passed through the Canadian residential school system. Begun in the 1870s, it was intended, in the words of government officials, to bring these children into the “circle of civilization,” the results, however, were far different. More often, the schools provided an inferior education in an atmosphere of neglect, disease, and often abuse. Using previously unreleased government documents, historian John S. Milloy provides a full picture of the history and reality of the residential school system. He begins by tracing the ideological roots of the system, and follows the paper trail of internal memoranda, reports from field inspectors, and letters of complaint. In the early decades, the system grew without planning or restraint. Despite numerous critical commissions and reports, it persisted into the 1970s, when it transformed itself into a social welfare system without improving conditions for its thousands of wards. A National Crime shows that the residential system was chronically underfunded and often mismanaged, and documents in detail and how this affected the health, education, and well-being of entire generations of Aboriginal children.

A Fatherly Eye

“ The Politics of Indian Affairs ' , in Getty and Lussier , eds , As Long As the Sun Shines and Water Flows , 169 , abridged from H.B. Hawthorn , ed . , A Survey of Contemporary Indians of Canada , Part 1 ( Ottawa 1966 ) , ch .

A Fatherly Eye

In A Fatherly Eye, historian Robin Brownlie examines how paternalism and assimilation during the interwar period were made manifest in the 'field', far from the bureaucrats in Ottawa, but never free of their oppressive supervision.

Spirits of the Rockies

“As Long as the Sun Shines and the Water Flows: An Historical Comment.” In Ian A.L. Getty and Antoine S. Lussier, eds, As Long as the Sun Shines and the Water Flows: A Reader in Canadian Native Studies, 1–26. Vancouver: UBC Press.

Spirits of the Rockies

The Banff–Bow Valley in western Alberta is the heart of spiritual and economic life for the Nakoda peoples. While they were displaced from the region by the reserve system and the creation of Canada’s first national park, in the twentieth century the Nakoda reasserted their presence in the valley through involvement in regional tourism economies and the Banff Indian Days sporting festivals. Drawing on extensive oral testimony from the Nakoda, supplemented by detailed analysis of archival and visual records, Spirits of the Rockies is a sophisticated account of the situation that these Indigenous communities encountered when they were denied access to the Banff National Park. Courtney W. Mason examines the power relations and racial discourses that dominated the eastern slopes of the Canadian Rocky Mountains and shows how the Nakoda strategically used the Banff Indian Days festivals to gain access to sacred lands and respond to colonial policies designed to repress their cultures.

Native Studies Review

In As Long as the Sun Shines and Water Flows : A Reader in Canadian Native Studies , ed . lan A.L. Getty and Antoine Lussier , pp . 13–30 ( Vancouver : University of British Columbia Press , 1983 ) ; Sarah Carter , Lost Harvesis ...

Native Studies Review