Attending to Women in Early Modern England

Attending to Women in Early Modern England

This volume contains the edited proceedings from the 1990 symposium "Attending to Women in Early Modern England," which was sponsored by the Center for Renaissance and Baroque Studies and the University of Maryland at College Park. Edited by Betty S. Travitsky and Adele F.

Attending

Medicine, Mindfulness, and Humanity

Attending

A guide to mindfulness as part of a safe, patient-centered health-care and medical practice describes the author's perspective-changing experiences as a Harvard Medical student at the sides of doctors who practiced in very different ways.

Attending Others

A Doctor's Education in Bodies and Words

Attending Others

Becoming a doctor requires years of formal education, but one learns the practice of medicine only through direct encounters with the fragile others called "patients." Pediatrician Brian Volck recounts his own education in the mysteries of suffering bodies, powerful words, and natural beauty. It's a curriculum where the best teachers are children and their mothers, the classrooms are Central American villages and desert landscapes, and the essential texts are stories, poems, and paintings. Through practices of focused attention, he grows from detached observer of his patients' lives into an uneasy witness and grateful companion. From the inner city to the Navajo Nation and from the Grand Canyon to the mountains of Honduras, Volck learns to listen to children unable to talk, to assist in healing when cure is impossible, and to love those whose life and experiences are radically different from his own. This is not a how-to book or a brief for reforming medical education. Attending Others is a highly personal account of what the author learned about medicine after he completed his formal education. The short answer, it turns out, is pretty much everything. .embed-container { position: relative; padding-bottom: 56.25%; height: 0; overflow: hidden; max-width: 100%; } .embed-container iframe, .embed-container object, .embed-container embed { position: absolute; top: 0; left: 0; width: 100%; height: 100%; }

Simple Guide to Attending Buddhist Ceremonies

Simple Guide to Attending Buddhist Ceremonies

In today's multicultural society we are increasingly likely to meet and become friends with people from different religious backgrounds, and to find ourselves attending an unfamiliar ceremony. When this happens, there can be few of us who know exactly what to expect, or are confident about how to behave. This chapter from Do I Kneel or Do I Bow? will tell you everything you need to understand and take part in a Buddhist ceremony. Armed with this basic information, you will feel relaxed enough to enjoy the occasion–and perhaps inspired to discover more about the spiritual world view of another cultural tradition.

Simple Guide to Attending Hindu Ceremonies

Simple Guide to Attending Hindu Ceremonies

In today's multicultural society we are increasingly likely to meet and become friends with people from different religious backgrounds, and to find ourselves attending an unfamiliar ceremony. When this happens, there can be few of us who know exactly what to expect, or are confident about how to behave. This chapter from Do I Kneel or Do I Bow? will tell you everything you need to understand and take part in a Hindu ceremony. Armed with this basic information, you will feel relaxed enough to enjoy the occasion–and perhaps inspired to discover more about the spiritual world view of another cultural tradition.

Attending to Early Modern Women

Conflict and Concord

Attending to Early Modern Women

A global, interdisciplinary consideration of the relationship between war and women's lives, works, economic situations, religious affiliations and practices in the early modern period, this volume gathers together scholars from literary studies, history, religious studies, and musicology. The juxtapositions, for example, of the impact of religious and economic strife emerging from the violence between European Catholics and Protestants, the civility in Grenada enhanced by Islamic religious codes, and the negotiations between Islamic and Catholic Malaysians, provide specific, telling windows into the complexities of women's lived experiences from the fourteenth through the seventeenth centuries.

Attending Madness

At Work in the Australian Colonial Asylum

Attending Madness

'He is what we would call a very good attendant, who would not run away or flinch from any patient, but would try to have his orders carried out if possible.' Such was the view of William Coady, attendant to the insane in the British settler colony of Victoria, Australia in the 1870s. Attending Madness is a history of William Coady's occupation, a history of asylum work and workers in nineteenth-century Australia. It considers not only who attendants were and why they worked in the asylum, but also how they and others variously defined 'the very good attendant'. Colonial asylum advocates imagined the attendant as an archetype, drawing on ideas from Britain about the nature of insanity and its treatment. In exploring the articulation of these ideas in a colonial context, and their effect on the asylum workplace, Lee-Ann Monk makes an important contribution to the international history of the asylum. She also opens new dimensions in the history of this occupation, on which the fate of patients very much depended, by analysing attendants' efforts to construct an occupational identity and give meaning to their work, thus providing new insights into their sense of themselves and their occupation.

Attending Daedalus

Gene Wolfe, Artifice and the Reader

Attending Daedalus

This new study of the fiction of Gene Wolfe, one of the most influential contemporary American science fiction writers, offers a major reinterpretation of Gene Wolfe’s four-volume The Book of the New Sun and its sequel The Urth of the New Sun. After exposing the concealed story at the heart of Wolfe’s magnum opus, Wright adopts a variety of approaches to establish that Wolfe is the designer of an intricate textual labyrinth intended to extend his thematic preoccupations with subjectivity, the unreliability of memory, the manipulation of individuals by social and political systems, and the psychological potency of myth, faith and symbolism into the reading experience.

Attending to Early Modern Women

Attending to Early Modern Women

This volume continues and amplifies a series of conversations initiated in 1990 at the conference, "Attending to Women in Early Modern England," sponsored by the University of Maryland's Center for Renaissance and Baroque Studies on the College Park campus. The volume celebrates the work of the almost 400 scholars who contributed - as plenary speakers, workshop leaders, and participants - to "Attending to Early Modern Women," held in April 1994, once again at the University of Maryland at College Park.