August Wilson s Pittsburgh Cycle

Providing a detailed study of American playwright August Wilson (1945-2005), this collection of new essays explores the development of the author's ethos across his twenty-five-year creative career--a process that transformed his life as he ...

August Wilson      s Pittsburgh Cycle

Providing a detailed study of American playwright August Wilson (1945–2005), this collection of new essays explores the development of the author’s ethos across his twenty-five-year creative career—a process that transformed his life as he retraced the lives of his fellow “Africans in America.” While Wilson’s narratives of Pittsburgh and Chicago are microcosms of black life in America, they also reflect the psychological trauma of his disconnection with his biological father, his impassioned efforts to discover and reconnect with the blues, with Africa and with poet/activist Amiri Baraka, and his love for the vernacular of Pittsburgh.

Emerging from the Ground

Pittsburgh playwright and poet August Wilson wrote a series of ten plays in which each play is set in a different decade of the twentieth century. This series of plays is often referred to as the Pittsburgh Cycle.

Emerging from the Ground

Pittsburgh playwright and poet August Wilson wrote a series of ten plays in which each play is set in a different decade of the twentieth century. This series of plays is often referred to as the Pittsburgh Cycle. The following thesis discusses the ways in which the Pittsburgh Cycle, as a body of work, performs a search and rescue mission whose aim is the restoration of black American memory and history. By discussing the work as a whole as well as particular plays in the Pittsburgh Cycle, this thesis traces the recurring thematic and symbolic similarities between the plays and their protagonists and Yeshua (Jesus) of Nazareth. The thesis outlines the salient points in the Jewish salvation narrative as understood from a messianic Jewish perspective, that is, from the perspective that Yeshua is indeed the Jewish messiah and the fulfillment of the Jewish story of redemption and salvation. After defining the Jewish narrative in terms of Yeshua, the thesis then discusses the ways in which black Christians in America have adopted and adapted certain characters and themes from the Jewish messianic narrative in order to make sense of their own personal and political struggles. Finally, I discuss the ways in which August Wilson included certain elements of the Jewish narrative in his own work. My research included detailed readings of interviews with August Wilson and the Pittsburgh Cycle, as well as extensive analysis of literary, dramatic and historical scholarship regarding Wilson’s work. I divided my study of black history into two basic categories. The first was the particular people mentioned by August Wilson in a speech he delivered in 1996 at the Theatre Communications Group National Conference in which the playwright described his artistic roots. The other category was that of the black church, including its history, its theology and its attendant political and social expressions, especially during the twentieth century. I restricted my research on Yeshua of Nazareth to a few select Biblical scholars with different theological backgrounds all of whom approach the subject of the Jewish Biblical narrative in strict historical terms.

Approaches to Teaching the Plays of August Wilson

In part 1 of this volume, “Materials,†the editors survey sources on Wilson’s biography, teachable texts of Wilson’s plays, useful secondary readings, and compelling audiovisual and Web resources.

Approaches to Teaching the Plays of August Wilson

The award-winning playwright August Wilson used drama as a medium to write a history of twentieth-century America through the perspectives of its black citizenry. In the plays of his Pittsburgh Cycle, including the Pulitzer Prizeâ€"winning Fences and The Piano Lesson, Wilson mixes African spirituality with the realism of the American theater and puts African American storytelling and performance practices in dialogue with canonical writers like Aristotle and Shakespeare. As they portray black Americans living through migration, industrialization, and war, Wilson’s plays explore the relation between a unified black consciousness and America’s collective identity. In part 1 of this volume, “Materials,†the editors survey sources on Wilson’s biography, teachable texts of Wilson’s plays, useful secondary readings, and compelling audiovisual and Web resources. The essays in part 2, “Approaches,†look at a diverse set of issues in Wilson’s work, including the importance of blues and jazz, intertextual connections to other playwrights, race in performance, Yoruban spirituality, and the role of women in the plays.

Gale Researcher Guide for August Wilson Performing the African American Historical Cycle

These study guides provide peer-reviewed articles that allow students early success in finding scholarly materials and to gain the confidence and vocabulary needed to pursue deeper research.

Gale Researcher Guide for  August Wilson  Performing the African American Historical Cycle

Gale Researcher Guide for: August Wilson: Performing the African American Historical Cycle is selected from Gale's academic platform Gale Researcher. These study guides provide peer-reviewed articles that allow students early success in finding scholarly materials and to gain the confidence and vocabulary needed to pursue deeper research.

August Wilson

A research and study guide to four plays by August Wilson includes plot summaries, lists of characters, and critical views.

August Wilson

A research and study guide to four plays by August Wilson includes plot summaries, lists of characters, and critical views.

August Wilson in an Hour

Know the playwright, love the play!The book features:- A. Wilson in an Hour, the primary portion of the book- A. Wilson in a Minute, a snapshot chronology- A complete listing of August Wilson's work- A list of August Wilson's contemporaries ...

August Wilson in an Hour

In 1960, August Wilson ended his formal education when he dropped out of high school after his teacher accused him of plagiarizing his paper on Napoleon. She implied it was too good for a black student to have written. Wilson retreated to Pittsburgh¿s Carnegie Library where, reading Langston Hughes and Ralph Ellison, he was inspired. Years later, that inspiration moved him to write The Pittsburgh Cycle, a series of ten plays that capture the experience of being black in twentieth-century America.Setting the playwright in context to his personal life, social, historical and political events, other writers of influence, and more, you will quickly gain a deep understanding of August Wilson and the plays he wrote. Read A. Wilson in an Hour and experience his plays like never before. Know the playwright, love the play!The book features:- A. Wilson in an Hour, the primary portion of the book- A. Wilson in a Minute, a snapshot chronology- A complete listing of August Wilson's work- A list of August Wilson's contemporaries in all fields- Excerpts from August Wilson's major plays- An extensive bibliography grouped according to type of reader- An index of the main essay.Playwrights in an Hour is a series devoted to the most produced and studied playwrights in the English language, from theGreek masters to contemporary writers, and written by leading authorities in the field. Each short book places the playwrightand his or her work in historical, social, and literary context.Joan Herrington, contemporary theater scholar, author, editor, teacher, and director. "In 1982, I met August Wilson at the Eugene O'Neill Theatre Centre and began a friendship that lasted twenty-three years. Each time I worked with him on a new play, I fell in love again with his extraordinary relationship to language, and his unending compassion for the characters he created. I am blessed for having known him, for sitting by his side while he wrote, for walking down the streets of Manhattan with him on our way to a coffee shop."

The Aesthetic of Place in the American Play cycle

Playwrights of the American play-cycle represent their characters' displacement and attempt to cure that displacement through a return to a rootedness in place.

The Aesthetic of Place in the American Play cycle

Playwrights of the American play-cycle represent their characters’ displacement and attempt to cure that displacement through a return to a rootedness in place. The play-cycle form demonstrates a unique theatre narrative that insists on an aesthetic of place. The play-cycle is viewed through contemporary American agrarian writers concerned with rootedness in place, YiFu Tuan’s geographic explorations of space and place, and Edward S. Casey’s seminal philosophical discussion of place as the primary experience of human identity. August Wilson’s Pittsburgh Cycle—ten decades of the African American experience in Pittsburg’s Hill District—demonstrates the place-making effects of food. While Horton Foote uses built structures to place his characters in their Costal Plains town of Harrison, Texas, in The Orphan’s Home Cycle. Because the play-cycle performance is intended to require an extended embodied commitment to a locale by an audience and performer community, the form suits Yi-Fu Tuan’s dictum “place is pause.” The theatre that rises out of this pause-inducing form both compels a place narrative and attempts to cure audience displacement creating an encompassing aesthetic of place.

A Study Guide for August Wilson s Seven Guitars

A Study Guide for August Wilson's "Seven Guitars", excerpted from Gale's acclaimed Drama for Students.This concise study guide includes plot summary; character analysis; author biography; study questions; historical context; suggestions for ...

A Study Guide for August Wilson s  Seven Guitars

A Study Guide for August Wilson's "Seven Guitars", excerpted from Gale's acclaimed Drama for Students.This concise study guide includes plot summary; character analysis; author biography; study questions; historical context; suggestions for further reading; and much more. For any literature project, trust Drama for Students for all of your research needs.

Jitney

Rereleased in time for its first Broadway run, Jitney is the seventh in Wilson's 10-play cycle on the black experience in 20th century America

Jitney

"Set in the 1970s, this richly textured piece follows a group of men trying to eke out a living by driving unlicensed cabs, or jitneys. When the city threatens to board up the business and the boss's son returns from prison, tempers flare, potent secrets are revealed and the fragile threads binding these people together may come undone at last."--Page 4 of cover.

August Wilson

Contributors to this collection of 15 essays are academics in English, theater, and African American studies.

August Wilson

Just prior to his death in 2005, August Wilson, arguably the most important American playwright of the last quarter-century, completed an ambitious cycle of ten plays, each set in a different decade of the twentieth century. Known as the Twentieth-Century Cycle or the Pittsburgh Cycle, the plays, which portrayed the struggles of African-Americans, won two Pulitzer Prizes for Drama, a Tony Award for Best Play, and seven New York Drama Critics Circle Awards. August Wilson: Completing the Twentieth-Century Cycle is the first volume devoted to the last five plays of the cycle individually—Jitney,Seven Guitars, King Hedley II, Gem of the Ocean, and Radio Golf—and in the context of Wilson's entire body of work. Editor Alan Nadel's May All Your Fences Have Gates: Essays on the Drama of August Wilson, a work Henry Louis Gates called definitive, focused on the first five plays of Wilson's cycle. This new collection examines from myriad perspectives the way Wilson's final works give shape and focus to his complete dramatic opus. It contains an outstanding and diverse array of discussions from leading Wilson scholars and literary critics. Together, the essays in Nadel's two volumes give Wilson's work the breadth of analysis and understanding that this major figure of American drama merits. Contributors Herman Beavers Yvonne Chambers Soyica Diggs Colbert Harry J. Elam, Jr. Nathan Grant David LaCroix Barbara Lewis Alan Nadel Donald E. Pease Sandra Shannon Vivian Gist Spencer Anthony Stewart Steven C. Tracy Dana Williams Kimmika L. H. Williams-Witherspoon

Encyclopedia of African American Popular Culture 4 volumes

August Wilson died on October 2, 2005, from liver cancer. Wilson's plays continued to be recognized for their dynamic insight into black life in the United States. ... ''August Wilson's Pittsburgh Cycle of Plays. Pittsburgh PostGazette ...

Encyclopedia of African American Popular Culture  4 volumes

This four-volume encyclopedia contains compelling and comprehensive information on African American popular culture that will be valuable to high school students and undergraduates, college instructors, researchers, and general readers. • Contains writings from 100 contributing authors, all identified in a separate listing • Includes a chronology placing pivotal events—such as the beginning of black baseball, the modern Civil Rights Movement, and the Harlem Renaissance—in historical context • Depicts key places, events, and people through photographs as well as words • Provides a list of black radio programs and movies

Feed Your Mind

Dorman, John L. “August Wilson's Pittsburgh,” New York Times, August 15, 2017. ... -on-which-i-stand-scenes-and-synposes-of-august-wilsons -10-play-cycle/3701 Play highlights, interview clips, Wilson biography, and time line. Pittsburgh ...

Feed Your Mind

A celebration of August Wilson’s journey from a child in Pittsburgh to one of America’s greatest playwrights August Wilson (1945–2005) was a two-time Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright who had a particular talent for capturing the authentic, everyday voice of black Americans. As a child, he read off soup cans and cereal boxes, and when his mother brought him to the library, his whole world opened up. After facing intense prejudice at school from both students and some teachers, August dropped out. However, he continued reading and educating himself independently. He felt that if he could read about it, then he could teach himself anything and accomplish anything. Like many of his plays, Feed Your Mind is told in two acts, revealing how Wilson grew up to be one of the most influential American playwrights. The book includes an author’s note, a timeline of August Wilson’s life, a list of Wilson’s plays, and a bibliography.

A Study Guide for August Wilson s Radio Golf

This concise study guide includes plot summary; character analysis; author biography; study questions; historical context; suggestions for further reading; and much more.

A Study Guide for August Wilson s  Radio Golf

A Study Guide for August Wilson's "Radio Golf," excerpted from Gale's acclaimed Drama For Students. This concise study guide includes plot summary; character analysis; author biography; study questions; historical context; suggestions for further reading; and much more. For any literature project, trust Drama For Students for all of your research needs.

Modern American Drama Playwriting in the 1980s

In addition, she has edited and co-edited the following key essay collections on Wilson's work: August Wilson and Black Aesthetics, MLA Approaches to Teaching the Plays of August Wilson, and August Wilson's Pittsburgh Cycle.

Modern American Drama  Playwriting in the 1980s

The Decades of Modern American Playwriting series provides a comprehensive survey and study of the theatre produced in each decade from the 1930s to 2009 in eight volumes. Each volume equips readers with a detailed understanding of the context from which work emerged: an introduction considers life in the decade with a focus on domestic life and conditions, social changes, culture, media, technology, industry and political events; while a chapter on the theatre of the decade offers a wide-ranging and thorough survey of theatres, companies, dramatists, new movements and developments in response to the economic and political conditions of the day. The work of the four most prominent playwrights from the decade receives in-depth analysis and re-evaluation by a team of experts, together with commentary on their subsequent work and legacy. A final section brings together original documents such as interviews with the playwrights and with directors, drafts of play scenes, and other previously unpublished material. The major playwrights and their plays to receive in-depth coverage in this volume include: David Mamet: Edmond (1982), Glengarry Glen Ross (1984), Speed-the-Plow (1988) and Oleanna (1992); David Henry Hwang: Family Devotions (1981), The Sound of a Voice (1983) and M. Butterfly (1988); Maria Irene Fornès: The Danube (1982), Mud (1983) and The Conduct of Life (1985); August Wilson: Ma Rainey's Black Bottom (1984), Joe Turner's Come and Gone (1984) and Fences (1987).

Focus On 100 Most Popular Tony Award Winners

"American Masters, August Wilson: The Ground on Which I Stand". PBS. 2012-02-20. Retrieved May 29, 2015. 4. ... Accessed July 8, 2010. ^ Isenberg, Robert. "The final installment of August Wilson's epic Pittsburgh Cycle premieres at the ...

Focus On  100 Most Popular Tony Award Winners


Modern American Drama Playwriting in the 1990s

August Wilson's Pittsburgh Cycle: Critical Perspectives on the Plays (Jefferson, NC: McFarland & Co., 2016), 5. Sarah Saddler and Paul Bryant-Jackson, 'Two Trains Running: Bridging Diana Taylor's “rift” and Narrating Manning Marable's ...

Modern American Drama  Playwriting in the 1990s

The Decades of Modern American Playwriting series provides a comprehensive survey and study of the theatre produced in each decade from the 1930s to 2009 in eight volumes. Each volume equips readers with a detailed understanding of the context from which work emerged: an introduction considers life in the decade with a focus on domestic life and conditions, social changes, culture, media, technology, industry and political events; while a chapter on the theatre of the decade offers a wide-ranging and thorough survey of theatres, companies, dramatists, new movements and developments in response to the economic and political conditions of the day. The work of the four most prominent playwrights from the decade receives in-depth analysis and re-evaluation by a team of experts, together with commentary on their subsequent work and legacy. A final section brings together original documents such as interviews with the playwrights and with directors, drafts of play scenes, and other previously unpublished material. The major playwrights and their plays to receive in-depth coverage in this volume include: * Tony Kushner: Angels in America: A Gay Fantasia on National Themes, Part One and Part Two (1991), Slavs! Thinking About the Longstanding Problems of Virtue and Happiness (1995) and A Dybbuk, or Between Two Worlds (1997); * Paula Vogel: Baltimore Waltz (1992), The Mineola Twins (1996) and How I Learned to Drive (1997); * Suzan-Lori Parks: The Death of the Last Black Man in the Whole Entire World (1990), The America Play (1994) and Venus (1996); * Terrence McNally: Lips Together, Teeth Apart (1991), Love! Valour! Compassion! (1997) and Corpus Christi (1998).

A Critical Companion to Lynn Nottage

Her scholarship on Wilson also includes numerous chapters and articles and two edited volumes: August Wilson's Pittsburgh Cycle and the co-edited MLA Approaches to Teaching the Plays of August Wilson. Dr. Shannon was a key consultant ...

A Critical Companion to Lynn Nottage

A Critical Companion to Lynn Nottage places this renowned, award-winning playwright's contribution to American theatre in scholarly context. The volume covers Nottage's plays, productions, activism, and artistic collaborations to display the extraordinary breadth and depth of her work. The collection contains chapters on each of her major works, and includes a special three-chapter section devoted to Ruined, winner of the 2009 Pulitzer Prize. The anthology also features an interview about collaboration and creativity with Lynn Nottage and two of her most frequent directors, Seret Scott and Kate Whoriskey.

King Hedley II

The eighth work in playwright August Wilson's ten-play cycle chronicling the history of the African-American experience in each decade of the 20th century, "King Hedley II" is set in 1985 and tells the story of an ex-con in post-Reagan ...

King Hedley II

The eighth work in playwright August Wilson's ten-play cycle chronicling the history of the African-American experience in each decade of the 20th century, "King Hedley II" is set in 1985 and tells the story of an ex-con in post-Reagan Pittsburgh trying to rebuild his life.

The Cambridge Companion to August Wilson

The following list of the ten plays that make up August Wilson's 'Pittsburgh Cycle' indicates the decades in which they are set and the year of first production. Gem of the Ocean 1900s (2003) Joe Turner's Come and Gone 1910s (1986) Ma ...

The Cambridge Companion to August Wilson

One of America's most powerful and original dramatists, August Wilson offered an alternative history of the twentieth century, as seen from the perspective of black Americans. He celebrated the lives of those seemingly pushed to the margins of national life, but who were simultaneously protagonists of their own drama and evidence of a vital and compelling community. Decade by decade, he told the story of a people with a distinctive history who forged their own future, aware of their roots in another time and place, but doing something more than just survive. Wilson deliberately addressed black America, but in doing so discovered an international audience. Alongside chapters addressing Wilson's life and career, and the wider context of his plays, this Companion dedicates individual chapters to each play in his ten-play cycle, which are ordered chronologically, demonstrating Wilson's notion of an unfolding history of the twentieth century.