Barbara La Marr

Barbara La Marr's (1896--1926) publicist once confessed: "There was no reason to lie about Barbara La Marr.

Barbara La Marr

Barbara La Marr's (1896--1926) publicist once confessed: "There was no reason to lie about Barbara La Marr. Everything she said, everything she did was colored with news-value." When La Marr was sixteen, her older half-sister and a male companion reportedly kidnapped her, causing a sensation in the media. One year later, her behavior in Los Angeles nightclubs caused law enforcement to declare her "too beautiful" to be on her own in the city, and she was ordered to leave. When La Marr returned to Hollywood years later, her loveliness and raw talent caught the attention of producers and catapulted her to movie stardom. In the first full-length biography of the woman known as the "girl who was too beautiful," Sherri Snyder presents a complete portrait of one of the silent era's most infamous screen sirens. In five short years, La Marr appeared in twenty-six films, including The Prisoner of Zenda (1922), Trifling Women (1922), The Eternal City (1923), The Shooting of Dan McGrew (1924), and Thy Name Is Woman (1924). Yet by 1925 -- finding herself beset by numerous scandals, several failed marriages, a hidden pregnancy, and personal prejudice based on her onscreen persona -- she fell out of public favor. When she was diagnosed with a fatal lung condition, she continued to work, undeterred, until she collapsed on set. She died at the age of twenty-nine. Few stars have burned as brightly and as briefly as Barbara La Marr, and her extraordinary life story is one of tempestuous passions as well as perseverance in the face of adversity. Drawing on never-before-released diary entries, correspondence, and creative works, Snyder's biography offers a valuable perspective on her contributions to silent-era Hollywood and the cinematic arts.

Hedy Lamarr

Recalling the late Barbara La Marr, he decided to rename Hedy Kiesler, Hedy
Lamarr. Mayer, Reisch mused, wasn't superstitious, exclaiming jauntily, “We are
going to replace death with life.”13 Hedy had no idea that she was to become the
 ...

Hedy Lamarr

Presents the life and career of the Hollywood actress, whose beauty and acting ability led to starring roles in over thirty films and who was also the co-inventor of a frequency-hopping technology still used today in cell phones.

Beautiful The Life of Hedy Lamarr

... Thau, and Strickling, Mayer remembered the tragically beautiful film actress
Barbara La Marr, “the girl who was too beautiful.” La Marr died in 1926 from
tuberculosis and alleged drug addiction.48 Hedy Kiesler would become Hedy
Lamarr.

Beautiful  The Life of Hedy Lamarr

The Surprising Story of Hedy Lamarr, "The Most Beautiful Girl in the World" As a teenage actress in 1920s Austria, performing on the stage and in film in light comedies and musicals, Hedy Kiesler, with her exotic beauty, was heralded across Europe by her mentor, Max Reinhardt. However, it was her nude scene, and surprising dramatic ability, in Ecstasy that made her a star. Ecstasy's notoriety followed her for the rest of her life. She married one of Austria's most successful and wealthy munitions barons, giving up her career for what seemed at first a fairy-tale existence. Instead, as war clouds loomed in the mid-1930s, Hedy discovered that she was trapped in a loveless marriage to a controlling, ruthless man who befriended Mussolini, sold armaments to Hitler, yet hid his own Jewish heritage to become an "honorary Aryan." She fled her husband and escaped to Hollywood, where M-G-M changed her name to Hedy Lamarr and she became one of film's most glamorous stars. She worked with such renowned directors as King Vidor, Victor Fleming, and Cecil B. DeMille, and appeared opposite such respected actors as Clark Gable, Spencer Tracy, John Garfield, and James Stewart. But as her career waned, her personal problems and legal wranglings cast lingering shadows over her former image. It wasn't until decades later that the world was stunned to learn of her unexpected role as the inventor of a technology that has become an essential part of everything from military weaponry to cell phones—proof that Hedy Lamarr was far more than merely Delilah to Victor Mature's Samson. She demonstrated a creativity and an intelligence she had always possessed. Stephen Michael Shearer's in-depth and meticulously researched biography, written with the cooperation of Hedy's children, intimate friends, and colleagues, separates the truths from the rumors, the facts from the fables, about Hedy Lamarr, to reveal the life and character of one of classic Hollywood's most beautiful and remarkable women.

ZaSu Pitts

In late 1925, La Marr, who had been indulging in heroin, cocaine, and alcohol in
her dressing room during the shoot, collapsed on the set. As the studio
scrambled to finish the movie, Barbara went into a coma. She regained
consciousness ...

ZaSu Pitts

Most often remembered for her gestures, expressive eyes, and body language on the screen, ZaSu Pitts was an unusual actress (and also an excellent cook: she often gave homemade candies to her coworkers, and her collection of candy recipes was published posthumously). This affectionate study of both her private life off-screen and her public persona details how the multi-talented actress become one of filmdom’s favorite comediennes and character players. The book includes many rare photographs.

American Classic Screen Profiles

La Marr's last film, The Girlfrom Montmartre, was written for her by Paul Bern in
1925. ... The February 24, 1926 Variety reminds us that “this picture was made
before Barbara La Marr's death and marked her return to West Coast productions
 ...

American Classic Screen Profiles

In American Classic Screen Profiles, editors John C. Tibbetts and James M. Welsh have assembled some of the most significant and memorable profiles written for the magazine over its ten-year history. This collection contains rare insights into some of the brightest stars of yesteryear, as well as gifted filmmakers, directors and craftsmen alike. This compendium of profiles recaptures the spirit and scholarship of that time and will appeal to both scholars and fans who have an abiding interest in the American motion picture industry.

John Gilbert

One rift in their long engagement came in the glamorous form of Barbara La Marr,
who would have a supporting role in his 1922 film Arabian Love and would later
have a costarring role in St. Elmo. La Marr was only twenty-six in 1922, but had ...

John Gilbert

Charming and classically handsome, John Gilbert (1897--1936) was among the world's most recognizable actors during the silent era. He was a wild, swashbuckling figure on screen and off, and accounts of his life have focused on his high-profile romances with Greta Garbo and Marlene Dietrich, his legendary conflicts with Louis B. Mayer, his four tumultuous marriages, and his swift decline after the introduction of talkies. A dramatic and interesting personality, Gilbert served as one of the primary inspirations for the character of George Valentin in the Academy Award--winning movie The Artist (2011). Many myths have developed around the larger-than-life star in the eighty years since his untimely death, but this definitive biography sets the record straight. Eve Golden separates fact from fiction in John Gilbert: The Last of the Silent Film Stars, tracing the actor's life from his youth spent traveling with his mother in acting troupes to the peak of fame at MGM, where he starred opposite Mae Murray, Norma Shearer, Joan Crawford, Greta Garbo, and other actresses in popular films such as TheMerry Widow (1925), The Big Parade (1925), Flesh and the Devil (1926), and Love (1927). Golden debunks some of the most pernicious rumors about the actor, including the oft-repeated myth that he had a high-pitched, squeaky voice that ruined his career. Meticulous, comprehensive, and generously illustrated, this book provides a behind-the-scenes look at one of the silent era's greatest stars and the glamorous yet brutal world in which he lived.

Spread Spectrum

Hedy Lamarr and the Mobile Phone Rob Walters. burst of applause. Though ...
We will also see whether this prediction about the long run stands up in the case
of Hedy Lamarr. Hedy was ... Barbara La Marr was born at about the same time
as ...

Spread Spectrum

This popular book was updated in 2013 just thirteen years after the death of the glamourous film star Hedy Lamarr. She was a famous Hollywood star and the first woman to appear naked on film. George Antheil was a piano player and composer. So just how did these two come to invent the latest technology used by the mobile phone? Or did they? She was labelled 'the most beautiful girl in the world' and he 'the bad boy of music' yet way back in 1942 they took out a patent covering the vital radio technique that we now call spread spectrum. This absorbing book traces the eventful and sometimes scandalous lives of Hedy and George. It tells the fascinating story of radio and the ongoing battle to make it secure and of similar quality to wired communication. Spread spectrum emerged from that battle to become the solution of choice for anything from mobile phones to wireless computer networks.

Opium

Known as The Count, he also addicted Mabel Normand, Barbara La Marr, Alma
Rubens and Juanita Hansen. Barbara La Marr died in 1926, aged thirty, of an
overdose of opiates and cocaine: the studio put it about she died of anorexia.

Opium

Known to mankind since prehistoric times, opium is arguably the oldest and most widely used narcotic. Opium: A History traces the drug's astounding impact on world culture--from its religious use by prehistoric peoples to its influence on the imaginations of the Romantic writers; from the earliest medical science to the Sino-British opium wars. And, in the present day, as the addict population rises and penetrates every walk of life, Opium shows how the international multibillion-dollar heroin industry operates with terrifying efficiency and forms an integral part of the world's money markets. In this first full-length history of opium, acclaimed author Martin Booth uncovers the multifaceted nature of this remarkable narcotic and the bittersweet effects of a simple poppy with a deadly legacy.

Love Signs and You

EVA MARIE SAINT NORMA SHEARER SYLVIA SIDNEY BARBARA STANWYCK
JAMES STEWART JILL ST . ... JOURDAN ANNA KARINA NICOLE KIDMAN
ALAN LADD BARBARA LA MARR MONICA LEWINSKY MARGARET
LOCKWOOD ...

Love Signs and You

An analysis of the astrology of romance features elaborate illustrations and coverage of such areas as the celestial and historical influences on sex appeal, how to find an ideal astrological match, the planetary profiles for more than ninety famous couples, and the astrological influences that were at play for each of the sun signs during the past century.

Women in World History Laa Lyud

La Marr , Barbara ( c . 1896 – 1926 ) American actress and screenwriter . Name
variations : also billed as Barbara Deely and Barbara La Marr Deely ; Barbara
LaMarr . Born Rheatha Watson on July 28 , 1896 ( also seen as September 3 ,
1898 ) ...

Women in World History  Laa Lyud

"Locating information on women is difficult and the editors have done a fine job assembling and publishing information extant on individual women from many nations both living and dead. Because in some cases only birth, marriage, children, and death dates are known, the 10,000 articles vary in length according to the subject. If you haven't been able to answer reference questions on women, you need this set."--"Outstanding Reference Sources," American Libraries, May 2001.

Palos Verdes Estates

In September 1925, La Venta Inn was chosen as a location for the film The Girl
from Montmartre, a silent film featuring Barbara La Marr and Lewis Stone (
pictured here) based on the book Spanish Sunlight by Anthony Pryde. This would
be La ...

Palos Verdes Estates

Situated on the westernmost cliffs of the Palos Verdes Peninsula, the city of Palos Verdes Estates continues to fulfill former landowner and developer Frank Vanderlip's vision of the area as the nation's "most fashionable and exclusive residential colony," and it remains one of Los Angeles County's most affluent cities. Development of open land began in 1922 under the direction of landscape designer Frederick Law Olmsted Jr. One of the first master-planned communities in the United States, Palos Verdes Estates (PVE) became the first of the four peninsula cities to be incorporated, in 1939. Early community life revolved around the Palos Verdes Golf Club, La Venta Inn, Malaga Cove School, and the charming Malaga Cove and Lunada Bay commercial areas, both of which have been graced by their own distinctive fountains. The Malaga Cove Library, a fine example of Early Californian design executed by architect Myron Hunt in 1930, was placed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1995.

Forming and Reforming the New Woman in Weimar Germany

Monstrous ambitions : Barbara La Marr Many of these same anxiety - evoking
traits marked another historical vamp figure whose biography was also presented
to Weimar audiences as a representative example of the female war generation ...

Forming and Reforming the New Woman in Weimar Germany


The Dream Endures

First of all, he gave her a new name, Hedy Lamarr, in honor of Barbara Lamarr,
the late Hollywood actress (she had died ... and nearnymphomania in his
Austrian import, Mayer sought to transform her into an Ice Queen á la Greta
Garbo and a ...

The Dream Endures

What we now call "the good life" first appeared in California during the 1930s. Motels, home trailers, drive-ins, barbecues, beach life and surfing, sports from polo and tennis and golf to mountain climbing and skiing, "sportswear" (a word coined at the time), and sun suits were all a part of the good life--perhaps California's most distinctive influence of the 1930s. In The Dream Endures, Kevin Starr shows how the good life prospered in California--in pursuits such as film, fiction, leisure, and architecture--and helped to define American culture and society then and for years to come. Starr previously chronicled how Californians absorbed the thousand natural shocks of the Great Depression--unemployment, strikes, Communist agitation, reactionary conspiracies--in Endangered Dreams, the fourth volume of his classic history of California. In The Dream Endures, Starr reveals the other side of the picture, examining the newly important places where the good life flourished, like Los Angeles (where Hollywood lived), Palm Springs (where Hollywood vacationed), San Diego (where the Navy went), the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena (where Einstein went and changed his view of the universe), and college towns like Berkeley. We read about the rich urban life of San Francisco and Los Angeles, and in newly important communities like Carmel and San Simeon, the home of William Randolph Hearst, where, each Thursday afternoon, automobiles packed with Hollywood celebrities would arrive from Southern California for the long weekend at Hearst Castle. The 1930s were the heyday of the Hollywood studios, and Starr brilliantly captures Hollywood films and the society that surrounded the studios. Starr offers an astute discussion of the European refugees who arrived in Hollywood during the period: prominent European film actors and artists and the creative refugees who were drawn to Hollywood and Southern California in these years--Igor Stravinsky, Arnold Schoenberg, Man Ray, Bertolt Brecht, Christopher Isherwood, Aldous Huxley, Thomas Mann, and Franz Werfel. Starr gives a fascinating account of how many of them attempted to recreate their European world in California and how others, like Samuel Goldwyn, provided stories and dreams for their adopted nation. Starr reserves his greatest attention and most memorable writing for San Francisco. For Starr, despite the city's beauty and commercial importance, San Francisco's most important achievement was the sense of well-being it conferred on its citizens. It was a city that "magically belonged to everyone." Whether discussing photographers like Edward Weston and Ansel Adams, "hard-boiled fiction" writers, or the new breed of female star--Marlene Dietrich, Jean Harlow, Bette Davis, Carole Lombard, and the improbable Mae West--The Dream Endures is a brilliant social and cultural history--in many ways the most far-reaching and important of Starr's California books.

Silent Players

After the death of Barbara La Marr, Philippe De Lacy (who was sometimes billed
as Philippe De Lacey) and his adopted mother moved into her home, leading at
least one fan magazine writer to note that “The boy who is too beautiful” now ...

Silent Players

" From his unique perspective of friendship with many of the actors and actresses about whom he writes, silent film historian Anthony Slide creates vivid portraits of the careers and often eccentric lives of 100 players from the American silent film industry. He profiles the era’s shining stars such as Lillian Gish and Blanche Sweet; leading men including William Bakewell and Robert Harron; gifted leading ladies such as Laura La Plante and Alice Terry; ingénues like Mary Astor and Mary Brian; and even Hollywood’s most famous extra, Bess Flowers. Although each original essay is accompanied by significant documentation and an extensive bibliography, Silent Players is not simply a reference book or encyclopedic recitation of facts culled from the pages of fan magazines and trade periodicals. It contains a series of insightful portraits of the characters who symbolize an original and pioneering era in motion history and explores their unique talents and extraordinary private lives. Slide offers a potentially revisionist view of many of the stars he profiles, repudiating the status of some and restoring to fame others who have slipped from view. He personally interviewed many of his subjects and knew several of them intimately, putting him in a distinctive position to tell their true stories.

City of Nets

Whena DailyNews reporter wenttothepier to interview “The Ecstasy Lady,
brunette Hedy Kiesler,” she said,“Myname is Hedy Lamarr. Please callmethat.”
Mayer had apparently named her after Barbara La Marr, a great beauty he
hadadmired in ...

City of Nets

In 1939, fifty million Americans went to the movies every week, Louis B. Mayer was the highest-paid man in the country, and Hollywood produced 530 feature films a year. One decade and five thousand movies later, the studios were faltering. The 1940s became the decade of Hollywood's decline: anticommunist hysteria excommunicated some of its best talent, while a 1948 antitrust consent decree ended many of the business practices that had made the studio system so profitable. In this masterful work of cultural history, the legendary Otto Friedrich tells the story of Hollywood's heyday and decline in a vivid narrative featuring an all-star cast of the actors, writers, musicians, composers, producers, directors, racketeers, labor leaders, journalists, and politicians who played major parts in the movie capital during the turbulent decade from World War II to the Korean War. Friedrich draws on sources from celebrity biographies to trade-union history, mingling lively gossip with analysis of Hollywood's seedier business dealings and telling the stories of legendary movies such as Citizen Kane, The Maltese Falcon, Double Indemnity, and All About Eve. A classic portrait of a special place in a special time, City of Nets gives us a singular behind-the-scenes glimpse into a bygone era that still captivates our imaginations.

Photoplay

I WANTED to make a success of being Barbara La Marr's husband. I loved her
when the name of Barbara La Marr wasn't known to a hundred people in the
motion picture industry, and I didn't love her any more or less because she
became a ...

Photoplay


A Life of Barbara Stanwyck

the script and working with Lamarr. ANew York Cinderella, budgeted at $700,000
, was in trouble, and months into it and $900,000 later production was stopped;
the picture, now called I Take This Woman, was shelved. Bob didn't like the script
 ...

A Life of Barbara Stanwyck

“860 glittering pages” (Janet Maslin, The New York Times): The first volume of the full-scale astonishing life of one of our greatest screen actresses; her work, her world, her Hollywood through an American century. Frank Capra called her, “The greatest emotional actress the screen has yet known.” Now Victoria Wilson gives us the first volume of the rich, complex life of Barbara Stanwyck, an actress whose career in pictures spanned four decades beginning with the coming of sound (eighty-eight motion pictures) and lasted in television from its infancy in the 1950s through the 1980s. Here is Stanwyck revealed as the quintessential Brooklyn girl whose family was in fact of old New England stock…her years in New York as a dancer and Broadway star…her fraught marriage to Frank Fay, Broadway genius…the adoption of a son, embattled from the outset…her partnership with Zeppo Marx (the “unfunny Marx brother”) who altered the course of Stanwyck’s movie career and with her created one of the finest horse breeding farms in the west…her fairytale romance and marriage to the younger Robert Taylor, America’s most sought-after male star… Here is the shaping of her career through 1940 with many of Hollywood's most important directors, among them Frank Capra, “Wild Bill” William Wellman, George Stevens, John Ford, King Vidor, Cecil B. Demille, Preston Sturges, set against the times—the Depression, the New Deal, the rise of the unions, the advent of World War II and a fast-changing, coming-of-age motion picture industry. And at the heart of the book, Stanwyck herself—her strengths, her fears, her frailties, losses, and desires—how she made use of the darkness in her soul, transforming herself from shunned outsider into one of Hollywood’s most revered screen actresses. Fifteen years in the making—and written with full access to Stanwyck’s family, friends, colleagues and never-before-seen letters, journals, and photographs. Wilson’s one-of-a-kind biography—“large, thrilling, and sensitive” (Michael Lindsay-Hogg, Town & Country)—is an “epic Hollywood narrative” (USA TODAY), “so readable, and as direct as its subject” (The New York Times). With 274 photographs, many published for the first time.

Life at the Marmont

... first set eyes on her, he had been reminded of another screen beauty, silent
star Barbara La Marr, “the girl who was too beautiful." Barbara was gone now, her
young life snuffed out at the height of her career, in 1926, by a drug overdose.

Life at the Marmont

Raymond Sarlot bought the Chateau Marmont in 1975, but what was originally a business purchase became a love affair as he delved into the hotel's incredible history. From its perch overlooking the Sunset Strip, the glamorous Marmont reigned for decades as the spot for artists, writers, musicians, and actors of every stripe and remains a home-away-from-home for A-listers like Scarlett Johansson and Johnny Depp. Here, Sarlot and co-author Fred E. Basten share a wealth of scandalous and intriguing tales about them all, from the stars of Hollywood's Golden Era like Jean Harlow and Grace Kelly to idols of the sixties and seventies like Jim Morrison and John Belushi (who tragically died there in 1982). Whether your obsession is Hollywood history or celebrity gossip, Life at the Marmont has plenty of gripping, juicy stories to fascinate.