Barbara La Marr

Barbara La Marr's (1896–1926) publicist once confessed: "There was no reason to lie about Barbara La Marr.

Barbara La Marr

Barbara La Marr's (1896--1926) publicist once confessed: "There was no reason to lie about Barbara La Marr. Everything she said, everything she did was colored with news-value." When La Marr was sixteen, her older half-sister and a male companion reportedly kidnapped her, causing a sensation in the media. One year later, her behavior in Los Angeles nightclubs caused law enforcement to declare her "too beautiful" to be on her own in the city, and she was ordered to leave. When La Marr returned to Hollywood years later, her loveliness and raw talent caught the attention of producers and catapulted her to movie stardom. In the first full-length biography of the woman known as the "girl who was too beautiful," Sherri Snyder presents a complete portrait of one of the silent era's most infamous screen sirens. In five short years, La Marr appeared in twenty-six films, including The Prisoner of Zenda (1922), Trifling Women (1922), The Eternal City (1923), The Shooting of Dan McGrew (1924), and Thy Name Is Woman (1924). Yet by 1925 -- finding herself beset by numerous scandals, several failed marriages, a hidden pregnancy, and personal prejudice based on her onscreen persona -- she fell out of public favor. When she was diagnosed with a fatal lung condition, she continued to work, undeterred, until she collapsed on set. She died at the age of twenty-nine. Few stars have burned as brightly and as briefly as Barbara La Marr, and her extraordinary life story is one of tempestuous passions as well as perseverance in the face of adversity. Drawing on never-before-released diary entries, correspondence, and creative works, Snyder's biography offers a valuable perspective on her contributions to silent-era Hollywood and the cinematic arts.

Barbara La Marr 43 Success Facts Everything You Need to Know about Barbara La Marr

Barbara La Marr Like never before. 'Barbara La Marr' (July 28, 1896ndash; January 30, 1926) was an American stage and feature female actor, show creator, and scriptwriter. This book is your ultimate resource for Barbara La Marr.

Barbara La Marr 43 Success Facts   Everything You Need to Know about Barbara La Marr

Barbara La Marr Like never before. 'Barbara La Marr' (July 28, 1896ndash; January 30, 1926) was an American stage and feature female actor, show creator, and scriptwriter. This book is your ultimate resource for Barbara La Marr. Here you will find the most up-to-date 43 Success Facts, Information, and much more. In easy to read chapters, with extensive references and links to get you to know all there is to know about Barbara La Marr's Early life, Career and Personal life right away. A quick look inside: The White Moth (film), Quincy Adams Sawyer - Cast, Hedy Lamarr - Hollywood, Yakima, Washington - Notable current and former residents, Desperate Trails - Cast, John Gilbert (actor) - Personal life, Hollywood Forever Cemetery - L, M. C. Levee - Career, St. Elmo (1923 American film) - Production, The Eternal Struggle (film) - Cast, Return to Babylon - Cast, Trifling Women - Production, St. Elmo (1923 American film) - Cast, The Shooting of Dan McGrew (1924 film) - Cast, The Three Musketeers (1921 film) - Cast, The Prisoner of Zenda (1922 film) - Cast, Pin-up - Notable pin-up girls, Hollywood Memorial Cemetery - L, The Nut (1921 film) - Cast, Arabian Love - Production and release, Anita Stewart - Biography, Strangers of the Night - Cast, 1926 in film - Deaths, The Eternal City (1923 film), ZaSu Pitts - Personal life, The Prisoner of Zenda - Adaptations, Souls for Sale - Plot, Milady de Winter - Film and television, Barbara La Marr - In popular culture, The White Moth (film) - Cast, Quincy Adams Sawyer - Reception, The Brass Bottle (1923 film) - Cast, Thy Name Is Woman - Cast, The Prisoner of Zenda (1922 film) - Plot, Arabian Love - Cast, Trifling Women - Cast, The Eternal City (1923 film) - Cast, Ben Lyon - Life, Souls for Sale - Cast, and much more...

Barbara La Marr Wearing a Tiara and Drop Earrings U 368 MC111 12 31a

Crayon drawing of bust of Barbara La Marr wearing a tiara and drop earrings. Bust is labeled (block letters in crayon). Right: bust in pencil and red crayon.

Barbara La Marr Wearing a Tiara and Drop Earrings  U 368  MC111 12 31a

Crayon drawing of bust of Barbara La Marr wearing a tiara and drop earrings. Bust is labeled (block letters in crayon). Right: bust in pencil and red crayon. Lower right corner: penciled bust (of La Marr?) with jeweled headband, drop earrings and fan comb in hair. Bottom: two penciled busts (of La Marr?), one with comb in hair.

Barbara La Marr

Charles Carter, “The Death of Barbara La Marr,” Picture Play, May 1926, 46. 18. Ibid. 19. Marjorie Driscoll, “Barbara La Marr Dies in Altadena: End Comes ...

Barbara La Marr

Barbara La Marr's (1896--1926) publicist once confessed: "There was no reason to lie about Barbara La Marr. Everything she said, everything she did was colored with news-value." When La Marr was sixteen, her older half-sister and a male companion reportedly kidnapped her, causing a sensation in the media. One year later, her behavior in Los Angeles nightclubs caused law enforcement to declare her "too beautiful" to be on her own in the city, and she was ordered to leave. When La Marr returned to Hollywood years later, her loveliness and raw talent caught the attention of producers and catapulted her to movie stardom. In the first full-length biography of the woman known as the "girl who was too beautiful," Sherri Snyder presents a complete portrait of one of the silent era's most infamous screen sirens. In five short years, La Marr appeared in twenty-six films, including The Prisoner of Zenda (1922), Trifling Women (1922), The Eternal City (1923), The Shooting of Dan McGrew (1924), and Thy Name Is Woman (1924). Yet by 1925 -- finding herself beset by numerous scandals, several failed marriages, a hidden pregnancy, and personal prejudice based on her onscreen persona -- she fell out of public favor. When she was diagnosed with a fatal lung condition, she continued to work, undeterred, until she collapsed on set. She died at the age of twenty-nine. Few stars have burned as brightly and as briefly as Barbara La Marr, and her extraordinary life story is one of tempestuous passions as well as perseverance in the face of adversity. Drawing on never-before-released diary entries, correspondence, and creative works, Snyder's biography offers a valuable perspective on her contributions to silent-era Hollywood and the cinematic arts.

Diary

Diary


Hedy Lamarr

Recalling the late Barbara La Marr, he decided to rename Hedy Kiesler, Hedy Lamarr. Mayer, Reisch mused, wasn't superstitious, exclaiming jauntily, ...

Hedy Lamarr

Presents the life and career of the Hollywood actress, whose beauty and acting ability led to starring roles in over thirty films and who was also the co-inventor of a frequency-hopping technology still used today in cell phones.

Dangerous Curves atop Hollywood Heels The Lives Careers and Misfortunes of 14 Hard Luck Girls of the Silent Screen

The book is illustrated with over 150 photographs.

Dangerous Curves atop Hollywood Heels  The Lives  Careers  and Misfortunes of 14 Hard Luck Girls of the Silent Screen

Named a Top 10 Best Silent Film Book in 2010 by the San Francisco Examiner! "We were like dragonflies. We seemed to be suspended effortlessly in the air, but in reality, our wings were beating very, very fast." - Mae Murray "It is worse than folly for persons to imagine that this business is an easy road to money, to contentment, or to that strange quality called happiness." - Bebe Daniels "A girl should realize that a career on the screen demands everything, promising nothing." - Helen Ferguson In Dangerous Curves Atop Hollywood Heels, author Michael G. Ankerich examines the lives, careers, and disappointments of 14 silent film actresses, who, despite the odds against them and warnings to stay in their hometowns, came to Hollywood to make names for themselves in the movies. On the screen, these young hopefuls became Agnes Ayres, Olive Borden, Grace Darmond, Elinor Fair, Juanita Hansen, Wanda Hawley, Natalie Joyce, Barbara La Marr, Martha Mansfield, Mary Nolan, Marie Prevost, Lucille Ricksen, Eve Southern, and Alberta Vaughn. Dangerous Curves follows the precarious routes these young ladies took in their quest for fame and uncovers how some of the top actresses of the silent screen were used, abused, and discarded. Many, unable to let go of the spotlight after it had singed their very souls, came to a stop on that dead-end street, referred to by actress Anna Q. Nilsson as, Hollywood's Heartbreak Lane. Pieced together using contemporary interviews the actresses gave, conversations with friends, relatives, and co-workers, and exhaustive research through scrapbooks, archives, and public records, Dangerous Curves offers an honest, yet compassionate, look at some of the brightest luminaries of the silent screen. The book is illustrated with over 150 photographs.

City of Flickering Light

With her “trademark wit and grace” (Randy Susan Meyers, author of The Murderer’s Daughters), Juliette Fay crafts another radiant and fascinating historical novel as thrilling as the bygone era of Hollywood itself.

City of Flickering Light

Juliette Fay—“one of the best authors of women’s fiction” (Library Journal)—transports us back to the Golden Age of Hollywood and the raucous Roaring Twenties, as three friends struggle to earn their places among the stars of the silent screen—perfect for fans of La La Land and Rules of Civility. It’s July 1921, “flickers” are all the rage, and Irene Van Beck has just declared her own independence by jumping off a moving train to escape her fate in a traveling burlesque show. When her friends, fellow dancer Millie Martin and comedian Henry Weiss, leap after her, the trio finds their way to the bright lights of Hollywood with hopes of making it big in the burgeoning silent film industry. At first glance, Hollywood in the 1920s is like no other place on earth—iridescent, scandalous, and utterly exhilarating—and the three friends yearn for a life they could only have dreamed of before. But despite the glamour and seduction of Tinseltown, success doesn’t come easy, and nothing can prepare Irene, Millie, and Henry for the poverty, temptation, and heartbreak that lie ahead. With their ambitions challenged by both the men above them and the prejudice surrounding them, their friendship is the only constant through desperate times, as each struggles to find their true calling in an uncertain world. What begins as a quest for fame and fortune soon becomes a collective search for love, acceptance, and fulfillment as they navigate the backlots and stage sets where the illusions of the silver screen are brought to life. With her “trademark wit and grace” (Randy Susan Meyers, author of The Murderer’s Daughters), Juliette Fay crafts another radiant and fascinating historical novel as thrilling as the bygone era of Hollywood itself.

American Classic Screen Profiles

This collection contains rare insights into some of the brightest stars of yesteryear, as well as gifted filmmakers, directors and craftsmen alike.

American Classic Screen Profiles

In American Classic Screen Profiles, editors John C. Tibbetts and James M. Welsh have assembled some of the most significant and memorable profiles written for the magazine over its ten-year history. This collection contains rare insights into some of the brightest stars of yesteryear, as well as gifted filmmakers, directors and craftsmen alike. This compendium of profiles recaptures the spirit and scholarship of that time and will appeal to both scholars and fans who have an abiding interest in the American motion picture industry.

Motion Picture

Now, they put her in a street-car conductor's uniform in Comrade X, play her as
an efficient New York business woman in H. M. Pulham, Esq. And she does go to
Drive-Ins for a snack. Yes indeed, the days of Barbara LaMarr's open check-book
 ...

Motion Picture


ZaSu Pitts

In late 1925, La Marr, who had been indulging in heroin, cocaine, and alcohol in ... As the studio scrambled to finish the movie, Barbara went into a coma.

ZaSu Pitts

Most often remembered for her gestures, expressive eyes, and body language on the screen, ZaSu Pitts was an unusual actress (and also an excellent cook: she often gave homemade candies to her coworkers, and her collection of candy recipes was published posthumously). This affectionate study of both her private life off-screen and her public persona details how the multi-talented actress become one of filmdom’s favorite comediennes and character players. The book includes many rare photographs.

Ramon Novarro

This comprehensive work details both the private and public aspects of Novarro's life to return him to his rightful place in film history. Includes a complete filmography and numerous photos.

Ramon Novarro

Ramon Novarro was Ben-Hur to moviegoers long before Charlton Heston. The 1926 film made Novarro—known as “Ravishing Ramon”—one of Hollywood’s most beloved silent film idols. His bright and varied career, spanning silents, talkies, the concert stage, theater, and television, came to a dark conclusion with his murder in 1968. This comprehensive work details both the private and public aspects of Novarro’s life to return him to his rightful place in film history. Includes a complete filmography and numerous photos.

Beautiful The Life of Hedy Lamarr

... Alan A Lady Without Passport The Lady Esther Screen Guild Theater Lady of the Tropics La Guardia, Fiorello Lake, Veronica La Marr, Barbara Lamarr, ...

Beautiful  The Life of Hedy Lamarr

The Surprising Story of Hedy Lamarr, "The Most Beautiful Girl in the World" As a teenage actress in 1920s Austria, performing on the stage and in film in light comedies and musicals, Hedy Kiesler, with her exotic beauty, was heralded across Europe by her mentor, Max Reinhardt. However, it was her nude scene, and surprising dramatic ability, in Ecstasy that made her a star. Ecstasy's notoriety followed her for the rest of her life. She married one of Austria's most successful and wealthy munitions barons, giving up her career for what seemed at first a fairy-tale existence. Instead, as war clouds loomed in the mid-1930s, Hedy discovered that she was trapped in a loveless marriage to a controlling, ruthless man who befriended Mussolini, sold armaments to Hitler, yet hid his own Jewish heritage to become an "honorary Aryan." She fled her husband and escaped to Hollywood, where M-G-M changed her name to Hedy Lamarr and she became one of film's most glamorous stars. She worked with such renowned directors as King Vidor, Victor Fleming, and Cecil B. DeMille, and appeared opposite such respected actors as Clark Gable, Spencer Tracy, John Garfield, and James Stewart. But as her career waned, her personal problems and legal wranglings cast lingering shadows over her former image. It wasn't until decades later that the world was stunned to learn of her unexpected role as the inventor of a technology that has become an essential part of everything from military weaponry to cell phones—proof that Hedy Lamarr was far more than merely Delilah to Victor Mature's Samson. She demonstrated a creativity and an intelligence she had always possessed. Stephen Michael Shearer's in-depth and meticulously researched biography, written with the cooperation of Hedy's children, intimate friends, and colleagues, separates the truths from the rumors, the facts from the fables, about Hedy Lamarr, to reveal the life and character of one of classic Hollywood's most beautiful and remarkable women.

Doom List

The Doom List – you'd rather be dead than be on it: the intriguing new 1920s mystery featuring Irish-born cop turned private investigator Tom Collins.

Doom List

The Doom List – you'd rather be dead than be on it: the intriguing new 1920s mystery featuring Irish-born cop turned private investigator Tom Collins. July, 1922. Newly-appointed 'movie czar' William H. Hays is about to arrive in town on a single-minded mission to clean up Hollywood. He is said to be compiling a list of 'undesirables' whom he plans to bar from screen work. They call it the Doom List. With the industry in the grip of fear and paranoia, Hollywood's hottest young director Rex Ingram is determined that no hint of scandal should mar the premiere of his new movie, The Prisoner of Zenda, and hires private investigator Tom Collins, a fellow Irishman, with instructions to protect his leading lady's reputation at all costs. But, as Collins discovers, Barbara La Marr isn't the only member of the cast hiding a dangerous secret. Meanwhile, a body is discovered in the Baldwin Hills to the south of the city. Could there be a connection? Against his better judgement, Collins is drawn into a case of scandal, forbidden love, blackmail . . . and cold-blooded murder.

Paul Bern

In this biography, the author uncovers startling new facts and argues that MGM knew the real story of Bern's death--that an estranged, mentally ill common-law wife murdered him.

Paul Bern

Paul Bern, known throughout the movie business as “Hollywood’s Father Confessor,” earned a reputation for being a loyal and supportive friend and for becoming one of MGM’s most respected and creative directors. After his death, though, he was said to have grown so depressed and despondent over his own apparent sexual inadequacies that he committed suicide, and he would be denounced for attempting to rape his new bride Jean Harlow. In this biography, the author uncovers startling new facts and argues that MGM knew the real story of Bern’s death—that an estranged, mentally ill common-law wife murdered him. MGM understood that the earlier spouse rendered Bern’s marriage to Harlow, its fastest-rising star, ambiguous if not bigamous, so the studio staged a suicide and embarked on a very public tarnishing of his memory. Included are 93 rare photos, many lost for decades, along with three appendices examining the handwriting on an alleged suicide note and Bern’s will and estate.

Silent Film Performers

LA MARR , Barbara ( Reatha Watson ) , Richmond , VA , 1896 - 1926 . None of
the melodramas in which Barbara La Marr appeared could match her own brief ,
tempestuous life . Her remarkable beauty ( she was “ The Girl Who Was Too ...

Silent Film Performers

Provides biographical and career data for each listed performer, an overview of published books and articles about or written by the performer and a list of archival materials, including photographs and stills, letters and scrapbooks

Urban Chroniclers in Modern Latin America

Urban Chroniclers in Modern Latin America: The Shared Intimacy of Everyday Life examines the work of extraordinary raconteurs Salvador Novo, Cube Bonifant, Roberto Arlt, Alfonsina Storni, and Mário de Andrade, restoring the original ...

Urban Chroniclers in Modern Latin America

An unstructured genre that blends high aesthetic standards with nonfiction commentary, the journalistic crónica, or chronicle, has played a vital role in Latin American urban life since the nineteenth century. Drawing on extensive archival research, Viviane Mahieux delivers new testimony on how chroniclers engaged with modernity in Mexico City, Buenos Aires, and São Paulo during the 1920s and 1930s, a time when avant-garde movements transformed writers' and readers' conceptions of literature. Urban Chroniclers in Modern Latin America: The Shared Intimacy of Everyday Life examines the work of extraordinary raconteurs Salvador Novo, Cube Bonifant, Roberto Arlt, Alfonsina Storni, and Mário de Andrade, restoring the original newspaper contexts in which their articles first emerged. Each of these writers guided their readers through a constantly changing cityscape and advised them on matters of cultural taste, using their ties to journalism and their participation in urban practice to share accessible wisdom and establish their role as intellectual arbiters. The intimate ties they developed with their audience fostered a permeable concept of literature that would pave the way for overtly politically engaged chroniclers of the 1960s and 1970s. Providing comparative analysis as well as reflection on the evolution of this important genre, Urban Chroniclers in Modern Latin America is the first systematic study of the Latin American writers who forged a new reading public in the early twentieth century.

Without Lying Down

... his closest friend's opinion didn't matter; Paul had courted other beauties like Barbara La Marr and Joan Crawford and Jean was his fantasy COme true.

Without Lying Down

Draws on personal letters, journals, and interviews with family members and colleagues to capture the life and times of Frances Marion