Baskets as Textile Art

"This book illustrates and discusses a wide variety of baskets, from those in museum collections to those commonly used today.

Baskets as Textile Art

"This book illustrates and discusses a wide variety of baskets, from those in museum collections to those commonly used today. Work from all over the world is included. Ceremonial baskets which support lavish facades of feathers and shells appear alongside humble work baskets and those made quickly to satisfy a moment's need. Traditional methods of converting plant materials into baskets are described. Contructions are pictured and their special qualities examined. As a hand process that has never been mechanized, basketmaking continues virtually unchanged from what it was thousands of years ago. Having survived without fundamental modification or improvement basketry retains--and demonstrates clearly--basic characteristics of textiles; it provides a sort of touchstone of textile values. Baskets have never lost their identity as constructions of fiber; their modular nature has always been easily perceptible, their patterns continually show their development from intersecting linear elements. Today baskets are being looked at as 'fiber sculpture'. Yet they are no different now than they have always been. The world has changed around them, so that baskets are perceived differently. 'Baskets as Textile Art' is concerned with a contemporary response to this ancient technology"--Publisher's description, p. [2] of dust jacket.

Prehistoric Textile Art of Eastern United States

TYPES OF BASKETRY . Perhaps no branch of the textile art was of greater importance to the aborigines than basketry . This term may be made to cover all woven articles of a portable kind which have sufficient rigidity to retain definite ...

Prehistoric Textile Art of Eastern United States


Interwoven Heritage

Interwoven Heritage


Aboriginal baskets

Overview of baskets as a textile art; preparation of materials; hand-spun plant fibre string bags; twined pandanus dilly bags; woven mats from Arnhem Land; coiled pandanus baskets; folded bark containers.

Aboriginal baskets

Overview of baskets as a textile art; preparation of materials; hand-spun plant fibre string bags; twined pandanus dilly bags; woven mats from Arnhem Land; coiled pandanus baskets; folded bark containers.

Prehstoric Textile Art of Eastern United States

carrying chairs, fish baskets, beds and seats were often similarly made. These articles, being generally ... BASKETRY. TYPES OF BASKETRY . Perhaps no branch of the textile art was of greater importance to the aborigines than basketry.

Prehstoric Textile Art of Eastern United States

Reproduction of the original: Prehstoric Textile Art of Eastern United States by William H. Holmes

Prehistoric Textile Art of Eastern United States

Basketry includes a number of groups of utensils distinguished from one another by the use to which they are devoted. ... BASKETS. Lawson refers to basket-making and other textile arts of the Carolina Indians in the following language: ...

Prehistoric Textile Art of Eastern United States


The Basketry Book

About the Publisher Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.com This book is a reproduction of an important historical work.

The Basketry Book

Excerpt from The Basketry Book: Twelve Lessons in Reed Weaving Basketry is one of the most ancient of crafts and probably the origin of all the textile arts of the world. The process of interweaving twigs, seeds, or leaves is practised among the rudest nations of the world; and as it is one of the most universal of arts, so also does it rank among the most ancient industries. Authorities on the subject declare that there has never been a tribe in any part of the world that has n0t employed some mode of making baskets, and that all the weaves in use at the present day have their origin in baskets made by our savage ancestors. A craft of such antiquity is naturally of surpassing interest. The ancient Britons appear to have excelled in the art of basket making, and the shields of the ancient warriors and also their huts were made of wicker-work; and their boats of the same material, covered with skins of animals, attracted the notice of the Romans. Herodotus mentions boats of this kind on the Tigris and Euphrates. Among many uncivilized tribes of the present day baskets of a superior order are made and applied to various useful purposes. The North American Indians prepare Strong, water-tight baskets from roots. The Indians of South America weave baskets equally useful from fronds of their native palms, while the Hottentots of South Africa are as skilful in using reeds and the roots of plants, and display great adroitness in the art of basket weaving. About the Publisher Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.com This book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully; any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works.

Prehstoric Textile Art of Eastern United States

Reproduction of the original: Prehstoric Textile Art of Eastern United States by William H. Holmes

Prehstoric Textile Art of Eastern United States

Reproduction of the original: Prehstoric Textile Art of Eastern United States by William H. Holmes

The Grove Encyclopedia of Materials and Techniques in Art

See also Fibre art. E. Rossbach: Baskets as TextileArt (London, 1973) D. Wright: The Complete Book of Baskets and Basketry (London, 1977 /R 1983) J. L. Larsen: Interlacing: The Elemental Fabric (Tokyo, New York and San Francisco, ...

The Grove Encyclopedia of Materials and Techniques in Art

Provides over 1400 articles that deal with materials and techniques in art from ancient times to the present, including such media as ceramics, sculpture, metalwork, painting, works on paper, textiles, video, and computer art.

A Study of the Textile Art

353, and the textile character was further imposed upon the clay by marking these coils with the thumb and with implements to give the effect of the transverse series of filaments, and the geometric color patterns of the basketry were ...

A Study of the Textile Art

Reproduction of the original: A Study of the Textile Art by William H. Holmes

A Measure of the Earth

Black Ash Baskets: Tips, Tools, and Techniques for Learning the Craft. Mechanicsburg, PA: Stackpole ... Weaving History: A Basket Heritage Project. ... Baskets as Textile Art. New York: Van Nostrand Reinhold Co., 1973. ROSSBACH, ED.

A Measure of the Earth

A Measure of the Earth provides an unparalleled window into an overlooked corner of recent American history: the traditional basketry revival of the past fifty years. Steve Cole and Martha Ware amassed a remarkable collection using the most stringent guidelines: baskets made from undyed domestic materials that have been harvested by the maker. An essay by Nicholas Bell details the long-standing use of traditional fibers such as black ash and white oak, willow and sweetgrass, and the perseverance of a select few to claim these elements--the land itself--for the enrichment of daily life. As they trek through woods, fields, farm, and shore in the quest for the right ingredients for a basket, these men and women cultivate an enviable knowledge of the land. Each basket crafted from this knowledge provides not only evidence of this connection to place, but also a measure of the earth. Drawing on conversations with the basketmakers from across the country and reproducing many of their documentary photographs, Bell offers an intimate glimpse of their lifeways, motivations, and hopes. Lavish illustrations of every basket convey the humble, tactile beauty of these functional vessels.

The Art of Native American Basketry

Aboriginal American Indian Basketry . Studies in a Textile Art Without Machinery . Annual Report of the U.S. National Museum 1902. Washington , D.C .: Government Printing Office . Merrill , Ruth E. 1923 . Plants Used in Basketry by the ...

The Art of Native American Basketry

George Wharton James once commented that the basket to the Indian "meant a work of art, in which hope, aspiration, desire, love, religion, poetry, national pride, mythology, were all more or less interwoven." The first major study of the subject since 1904, this book presents essays written by those intimately familiar with the basket makers and basketry of North America. Illustrated with approximately 80 black-and-white photographs--many of which are historical records of basketry--Native American Basketry uses archaeological, ethnographic, historical and contemporary information in discussing the changes in native basketry from prehistoric times to the present.

Hopi Basket Weaving

Indian Basketry . Dover Publications , New York . Jeancon , Jean Allard , and Frederic Huntington Douglas . 1931. Hopi Indian Basketry . Denver Art Museum Leaflet 17. Denver . Laird , W. David . 1977. Hopi Bibliography : Comprehensive ...

Hopi Basket Weaving

"With the inborn wisdom that has guided them for so long through so many obstacles, Hopi men and women perpetuate their proven rituals, strongly encouraging those who attempt to neglect or disrespect their obligations to uphold them. One of these obligations is to respect the flora and fauna of our planet. The Hopi closeness to the Earth is represented in all the arts of all three mesas, whether in clay or natural fibers. What clay is to a potter's hands, natural fibers are to a basket weaver."--from the Introduction Rising dramatically from the desert floor, Arizona's windswept mesas have been home to the Hopis for hundreds of years. A people known for protecting their privacy, these Native Americans also have a long and less known tradition of weaving baskets and plaques. Generations of Hopi weavers have passed down knowledge of techniques and materials from the plant world around them, from mother to daughter, granddaughter, or niece. This book is filled with photographs and detailed descriptions of their beautiful baskets--the one art, above all others, that creates the strongest social bonds in Hopi life. In these pages, weavers open their lives to the outside world as a means of sharing an art form especially demanding of time and talent. The reader learns how plant materials are gathered in canyons and creek bottoms, close to home and far away. The long, painstaking process of preparation and dying is followed step by step. Then, using techniques of coiled, plaited, or wicker basketry, the weaving begins. Underlying the stories of baskets and their weavers is a rare glimpse of what is called "the Hopi Way," a life philosophy that has strengthened and sustained the Hopi people through centuries of change. Many other glimpses of the Hopi world are also shared by author and photographer Helga Teiwes, who was warmly invited into the homes of her collaborators. Their permission and the permission of the Cultural Preservation Office of the Hopi Tribe gave her access to people and information seldom available to outsiders. Teiwes was also granted access to some of the ceremonial observances where baskets are preeminent. Woven in brilliant reds, greens, and yellows as well as black and white, Hopi weavings, then, not only are an arresting art form but also are highly symbolic of what is most important in Hopi life. In the women's basket dance, for example, woven plaques commemorate and honor the Earth and the perpetuation of life. Other plaques play a role in the complicated web of Hopi social obligation and reciprocity. Living in a landscape of almost surreal form and color, Hopi weavers are carrying on one of the oldest arts traditions in the world. Their stories in Hopi Basket Weaving will appeal to collectors, artists and craftspeople, and anyone with an interest in Native American studies, especially Native American arts. For the traveler or general reader, the book is an invitation to enter a little-known world and to learn more about an art form steeped in meaning and stunning in its beauty.

Using Textile Arts and Handcrafts in Therapy with Women

These literary references can be easily incorporated into textile art therapy as metaphors (see Chapter 6). ... Usually baskets are made from organic materials, and they typically serve a functional use as a receptacle for dry food ...

Using Textile Arts and Handcrafts in Therapy with Women

Original research and examples from artists illustrate how different textile-based art approaches can provide therapeutic outlets for women with a complete variety of life experiences. The psychology of this therapeutic approach is explained as well as explanations of specific techniques and suggestions for practise with a wide range of clients.

Art Kids and Christian Education

Baskets are mentioned many times in the Bible , from the story of the infant Moses placed in the bulrushes to the twelve baskets that gathered up the leftovers after the miracle of the loaves and fishes . Textiles The creation of thread ...

Art  Kids  and Christian Education

Art doesn't just provide a fun escape for kids - it can be used as a significant part of the Christian education process. This book shows how to explore the Bible stories through artistic media such as pottery, weaving, painting, and more.

The Basketmaker s Art

He exhibited his non - traditional baskets along with other non - loomed textiles in 1968. When his book Baskets As Textile Art was published in 1973 , the textile community was surprised by it . He did what is popularly called in ...

The Basketmaker s Art


The Grove Encyclopedia of Decorative Arts

Stake and strand baskets are woven in much the same way as textiles, but without the aid of a loom. The warp and weft, which may be of different materials and widths, are interlaced at right angles to produce a fabric.

The Grove Encyclopedia of Decorative Arts

Contains information drawn from Grove Art Online and new material written by G. Campbell. Cf. Preface.

Textile Techniques in Metal

For Jewelers, Textile Artists & Sculptors Arline M. Fisch ... The Textiles of Ancient Peru and Their Techniques . ... BASKETRY Cane and Basket Supply Company , 1283 South Cochran Avenue , Los Angeles , California 90019 : Instruction ...

Textile Techniques in Metal

In 'Textile Techniques in Metal', Arline Fisch describes in detail the application of the fibre techniques to precious and non-precious metals, and then goes on to describe the tools and materials required.

Indian Art of the Americas at the Art Institute of Chicago

Basketry Brown, Susan McGreevy. 2001. Indian Basketry Artists of the Southwest. Contemporary Indian Artists. School of American Research Press. Mason, Otis Tufton. (1902) 1984. Aboriginal American Basketry: Studies in a Textile Art ...

Indian Art of the Americas at the Art Institute of Chicago

A stunning survey of the indigenous art, architecture, and spiritual beliefs of the Americas, from the Precolumbian era to the 20th century This landmark publication catalogues the Art Institute of Chicago’s outstanding collection of Indian art of the Americas, one of the foremost of its kind in the United States. Showcasing a host of previously unpublished objects dating from the Precolumbian era to the 20th century, the book marks the first time these holdings have been comprehensively documented. Richard Townsend and Elizabeth Pope weave an overarching narrative that ranges from the Midwestern United States to the Yucatán Peninsula to the heart of South America. While exploring artists’ myriad economic, historical, linguistic, and social backgrounds, the authors demonstrate that they shared both a deep, underlying cosmological view and the desire to secure their communities’ prosperity by affirming connections to the sacred forces of the natural world. The critical essays focus on topics that bridge traditions across North, Central, and South America, including materials, methods of manufacture, the diversity of stylistic features, and the iconography and functions of various objects. Gorgeously illustrated in color with more than 500 vibrant images, this handsome catalogue serves as the definitive survey of an unparalleled collection.