Beyond Confederation

The essays in this collection question much of the heritage of eighteenth-century constitutional thought and suggest that many of the commonly debated issues have led us away from the truly germane questions.

Beyond Confederation

Beyond Confederation scrutinizes the ideological background of the U.S. Constitution, the rigors of its writing and ratification, and the problems it both faced and provoked immediately after ratification. The essays in this collection question much of the heritage of eighteenth-century constitutional thought and suggest that many of the commonly debated issues have led us away from the truly germane questions. The authors challenge many of the traditional generalizations and the terms and scope of that debate as well. The contributors raise fresh questions about the Constitution as it enters its third century. What happened in Philadelphia in 1787, and what happened in the state ratifying conventions? Why did the states--barely--ratify the Constitution? What were Americans of the 1789s attempting to achieve? The exploratory conclusions point strongly to an alternative constitutional tradition, some of it unwritten, much of it rooted in state constitutional law; a tradition that not only has redefined the nature and role of the Constitution but also has placed limitations on its efficacy throughout American history. The authors are Lance Banning, Richard Beeman, Stephen Botein, Richard D. Brown, Richard E. Ellis, Paul Finkelman, Stanley N. Katz, Ralph Lerner, Drew R. McCoy, John M. Murrin, Jack N. Rakove, Janet A. Riesman, and Gordon S. Wood.

Roads to Confederation

79 80 81 82 83 Richard E. Ellis, “The Persistence of Antifederalism after 1789,” in Beeman et al., eds., Beyond Confederation, 295–314.

Roads to Confederation

Roads to Confederation: The Making of Canada, 1867 Volume 2 includes material that demonstrates the varied perspectives from the provinces and regions of Canada and the viewpoints of officials in Great Britain and the United States and significant works by scholars that question whether Confederation was truly a formative event.

The Culture of National Identities

Beyond Confederation: Origins of the Constitution and American National Identity (Chapel Hill and London: University of North Carolina Press, 1987), 333–38; ...

The Culture of National Identities


Gambia

Gambia


The Dance with Community

Beyond Confederation: Origins of the Constitution and American National Identity. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1987. . "Introduction.

The Dance with Community

Not an essay in normative political philosophy, but a discussion of the present-day developments in American political thought as they focus on community. Fowler (political science, U. of Wisconsin) tells the story of the coming of age of community in the thought of American political intellectuals and provides measured analysis and reflection on some of the directions in which thinking about community has proceeded. Annotation copyrighted by Book News, Inc., Portland, OR

Beyond the Founders

... and Disinterestedness in the Making of the Constitution , " in Beyond Confederation : Origins of the Constitution and American National Identity , ed .

Beyond the Founders

In pursuit of a more sophisticated and inclusive American history, the contributors to Beyond the Founders propose new directions for the study of the political history of the republic before 1830. In ways formal and informal, symbolic and tactile,

Beyond a Degree

Beyond a Degree


In R. Beeman, S. Botein, & E. Carter III (Eds.), Beyond confederation: Origins of the constitution and national identity (pp. 128-161).


America s Authors

Beyond Confederation: Origins of the Constitution and American National Identity. Chapel Hill and London: University of North Carolina Press, 1987.

America s Authors


The Maastricht Debates and Beyond

According to Paris, such a confederation would aim at creating a framework for bringing together all European countries. It would be provided with light ...

The Maastricht Debates and Beyond

Second in a biennial series of yearbooks on the state of the European Community, this book, which covers 1991 and 1992, takes up where The State of the European Community: Policies, Institutions, and Debates in the Transition Years (edited by Leon Hurwitz and Christian Lequesne) left off. The current volume not only provides a description of key issues and developments in the European Community (EC) during 1991-1992, but also comments on and analyzes events from a variety of conceptual and theoretical perspectives. Community Studies Association (ECSA). ECSA exists to develop a community of people interested in the EC and to raise the level of knowledge about it.

Textiles Beyond

In Indian context.

Textiles   Beyond

In Indian context.

The Varieties of Political Experience in Eighteenth Century America

In The Varieties of Political Experience in Eighteenth-Century America, Richard R. Beeman offers an ambitious overview of political life in pre-Revolutionary America.

The Varieties of Political Experience in Eighteenth Century America

On the eve of the American Revolution there existed throughout the British-American colonial world a variety of contradictory expectations about the political process. Not only was there disagreement over the responsibilities of voters and candidates, confusion extended beyond elections to the relationship between elected officials and the populations they served. So varied were people's expectations that it is impossible to talk about a single American political culture in this period. In The Varieties of Political Experience in Eighteenth-Century America, Richard R. Beeman offers an ambitious overview of political life in pre-Revolutionary America. Ranging from Virginia, Massachusetts, New York, South Carolina, and Pennsylvania to the backcountry regions of the South, the Mid-Atlantic, and northern New England, Beeman uncovers an extraordinary diversity of political belief and practice. In so doing, he closes the gap between eighteenth-century political rhetoric and reality. Political life in eighteenth-century America, Beeman demonstrates, was diffuse and fragmented, with America's British subjects and their leaders often speaking different political dialects altogether. Although the majority of people living in America before the Revolution would not have used the term "democracy," important changes were underway that made it increasingly difficult for political leaders to ignore "popular pressures." As the author shows in a final chapter on the Revolution, those popular pressures, once unleashed, were difficult to contain and drove the colonies slowly and unevenly toward a democratic form of government. Synthesizing a wide range of primary and secondary sources, Beeman offers a coherent account of the way politics actually worked in this formative time for American political culture.

Power Failure

... of Nova Scotia's coal exports, renewal of reciprocity with the US became a potent political issue in the years leading up to, and beyond, Confederation.

Power Failure

Three centuries of experience have done nothing to teach Nova Scotia governments how to use energy resources. Will the next 10 years be any different?

The Oxford Handbook of Church and State in the United States

Beyond Confederation: Origins of the American Constitution and American National Identity. Chapel Hill, NC: University of North Carolina Press, 1987.

The Oxford Handbook of Church and State in the United States

Study of church and state in the United States is incredibly complex. Scholars working in this area have backgrounds in law, religious studies, history, theology, and politics, among other fields. Historically, they have focused on particular angles or dimensions of the church-state relationship, because the field is so vast. The results have mostly been monographs that focus only on narrow cross-sections of the field, and the few works that do aim to give larger perspectives are reference works of factual compendia, which offer little or no analysis. The Oxford Handbook of Church and State in the United States fills this gap, presenting an extensive, multidimensional overview of the field. Twenty-one essays offer a scholarly look at the intricacies and past and current debates that frame the American system of church and state, within five main areas: history, law, theology/philosophy, politics, and sociology. These essays provide factual accounts, but also address issues, problems, debates, controversies, and, where appropriate, suggest resolutions. They also offer analysis of the range of interpretations of the subject offered by various American scholars. This Handbook is an invaluable resource for the study of church-state relations in the United States.

We Have Not a Government

The Articles of Confederation and the Road to the Constitution George ... of the Federal Constitution in Massachusetts,” in Beyond Confederation: Origins of ...

We Have Not a Government

In 1783, as the Revolutionary War came to a close, Alexander Hamilton resigned in disgust from the Continental Congress after it refused to consider a fundamental reform of the Articles of Confederation. Just four years later, that same government collapsed, and Congress grudgingly agreed to support the 1787 Philadelphia Constitutional Convention, which altered the Articles beyond recognition. What occurred during this remarkably brief interval to cause the Confederation to lose public confidence and inspire Americans to replace it with a dramatically more flexible and powerful government? We Have Not a Government is the story of this contentious moment in American history. In George William Van Cleve’s book, we encounter a sharply divided America. The Confederation faced massive war debts with virtually no authority to compel its members to pay them. It experienced punishing trade restrictions and strong resistance to American territorial expansion from powerful European governments. Bitter sectional divisions that deadlocked the Continental Congress arose from exploding western settlement. And a deep, long-lasting recession led to sharp controversies and social unrest across the country amid roiling debates over greatly increased taxes, debt relief, and paper money. Van Cleve shows how these remarkable stresses transformed the Confederation into a stalemate government and eventually led previously conflicting states, sections, and interest groups to advocate for a union powerful enough to govern a continental empire. Touching on the stories of a wide-ranging cast of characters—including John Adams, Patrick Henry, Daniel Shays, George Washington, and Thayendanegea—Van Cleve makes clear that it was the Confederation’s failures that created a political crisis and led to the 1787 Constitution. Clearly argued and superbly written, We Have Not a Government is a must-read history of this crucial period in our nation’s early life.

The Founding Fathers

... States during the Confederation period, deserves to be restored to print; ... eds., Beyond Confederation: Dimensions of the Constitution and American ...

The Founding Fathers

The Founding Fathers is a concise, accessible overview of the brilliant, flawed, and quarrelsome group of lawyers, politicians, merchants, military men, and clergy known as "the Founding Fathers"--who got as close to the ideal of the Platonic "philosopher-kings" as American or world history has ever seen. R. B. Bernstein reveals Washington, Franklin, Jefferson, Adams, Hamilton, and the other founders not as shining demigods but as imperfect human beings--people much like us--who nevertheless achieved political greatness. They emerge here as men who sought to transcend their intellectual world even as they were bound by its limits, men who strove to lead the new nation even as they had to defer to the great body of the people and learn with them the possibilities and limitations of politics. Bernstein deftly traces the dynamic forces that molded these men and their contemporaries as British colonists in North America and as intellectual citizens of the Atlantic civilization's Age of Enlightenment. He analyzes the American Revolution, the framing and adoption of state and federal constitutions, and the key concepts and problems that both shaped and circumscribed the founders' achievements as the United States sought its place in the world. Finally, he charts the shifting reputations of the founders and examines the specific ways that interpreters of the Constitution have used the Founding Fathers. A masterly blend of old and new scholarship, brimming with apt description and insightful analysis, this book offers a digestible account of how the Founding Fathers were formed, what they did, and how generations of Americans have viewed them. ABOUT THE SERIES: The Very Short Introductions series from Oxford University Press contains hundreds of titles in almost every subject area. These pocket-sized books are the perfect way to get ahead in a new subject quickly. Our expert authors combine facts, analysis, perspective, new ideas, and enthusiasm to make interesting and challenging topics highly readable.

Democracy s Schools

... connectedness that extends beyond the bounds of family and neighborhood ... Beyond Confederation: Origins of the Constitution and American Identity, ed.

Democracy s Schools

At a time when Americans are debating the future of public education, Johann N. Neem tells the inspiring story of how and why Americans built a robust public school system in the decades between the Revolution and the Civil War. It’s a story in which ordinary people in towns across the country worked together to form districts and build schoolhouses and reformers sought to expand tax support and give every child a liberal education. By the time of the Civil War, most northern states had made common schools free, and many southern states were heading in the same direction. Americans made schooling a public good. Yet back then, like today, Americans disagreed over the kind of education needed, who should pay for it, and how schools should be governed. Neem explores the history and meaning of these disagreements. As Americans debated, teachers and students went about the daily work of teaching and learning. Neem takes us into the classrooms of yore so that we may experience public schools from the perspective of the people whose daily lives were most affected by them. Ultimately, Neem concludes, public schools encouraged a diverse people to see themselves as one nation. By studying the origins of America’s public schools, Neem urges us to focus on the defining features of democratic education: promoting equality, nurturing human beings, preparing citizens, and fostering civic solidarity.

Canadian History Since Confederation Essays and Interpretations

It is to be found in the dear, dead Clear Grit days beyond Confederation and it crops up frequently on this side of that great divide.

Canadian History Since Confederation  Essays and Interpretations