Beyond Freedom and Dignity

Beyond Freedom and Dignity urges us to reexamine the ideals we have taken for granted and to consider the possibility of a radically behaviorist approach to human problems--one that has appeared to some incompatible with those ideals, but ...

Beyond Freedom and Dignity

In this profound and profoundly controversial work, a landmark of 20th-century thought originally published in 1971, B. F. Skinner makes his definitive statement about humankind and society. Insisting that the problems of the world today can be solved only by dealing much more effectively with human behavior, Skinner argues that our traditional concepts of freedom and dignity must be sharply revised. They have played an important historical role in our struggle against many kinds of tyranny, he acknowledges, but they are now responsible for the futile defense of a presumed free and autonomous individual; they are perpetuating our use of punishment and blocking the development of more effective cultural practices. Basing his arguments on the massive results of the experimental analysis of behavior he pioneered, Skinner rejects traditional explanations of behavior in terms of states of mind, feelings, and other mental attributes in favor of explanations to be sought in the interaction between genetic endowment and personal history. He argues that instead of promoting freedom and dignity as personal attributes, we should direct our attention to the physical and social environments in which people live. It is the environment rather than humankind itself that must be changed if the traditional goals of the struggle for freedom and dignity are to be reached. Beyond Freedom and Dignity urges us to reexamine the ideals we have taken for granted and to consider the possibility of a radically behaviorist approach to human problems--one that has appeared to some incompatible with those ideals, but which envisions the building of a world in which humankind can attain its greatest possible achievements.

Beyond Freedom and Dignity

Beyond Freedom and Dignity


Beyond Freedom and Dignity

Beyond Freedom and Dignity


Personality Theories

But first, “useless” concepts like “freedom” and “dignity” must be abandoned, he thought. Skinner's long essay, Beyond Freedom and Dignity, summarized not only his thinking but also what behaviorism meant for the general population.

Personality Theories

Personality Theories: Critical Perspectives is the groundbreaking, final text written by Albert Ellis, long considered the founder of cognitive behavioral therapies. The book provides students with supporting and contradictory evidence for the development of personality theories through time. Without condemning the founding theorists who came before him, Ellis builds on more than a century of psychological research to re-examine the theories of Freud, Jung, and Adler while taking an equally critical look at modern, research-based theories, including his own.

Science And Human Behavior

Many students of society and culture would take violent issue with most of the things that Skinner has to say, but even those who disagree most will find this a stimulating book.” —Samuel M. Strong, The American Journal of Sociology ...

Science And Human Behavior

The psychology classic—a detailed study of scientific theories of human nature and the possible ways in which human behavior can be predicted and controlled—from one of the most influential behaviorists of the twentieth century and the author of Walden Two. “This is an important book, exceptionally well written, and logically consistent with the basic premise of the unitary nature of science. Many students of society and culture would take violent issue with most of the things that Skinner has to say, but even those who disagree most will find this a stimulating book.” —Samuel M. Strong, The American Journal of Sociology “This is a remarkable book—remarkable in that it presents a strong, consistent, and all but exhaustive case for a natural science of human behavior…It ought to be…valuable for those whose preferences lie with, as well as those whose preferences stand against, a behavioristic approach to human activity.” —Harry Prosch, Ethics

Bridging Philosophy and Psychology Using the Example of Behaviourism and B F Skinner s Beyond Freedom and Dignity

The book represents a philosophical view on man from a behaviouristic perspective, providing a technology of behaviour to solve the problems of mankind. An approach that seems absurd but that mirrors the distinguished

Bridging Philosophy and Psychology Using the Example of Behaviourism and B F  Skinner s  Beyond Freedom and Dignity

Seminar paper from the year 2004 in the subject English Language and Literature Studies - Other, grade: 1 (A), Otto-von-Guericke-University Magdeburg (Institute for Foreign Language Philology), course: The Beautiful and the Sublime, language: English, comment: The paper is a philosophical discussion of the psychological school of Behaviourism, relating the philosophical ideas of B. F. Skinner to early English empisicists, John Locke and David Hume. Including facts towards Behaviourism and Empirism, also comprising a summary of B. F. Skinner's "Beyond Freedom and Dignity.", abstract: It seems impossible to give a precise definition of the term philosophy and the teachings that are connected with it. Generally, philosophers' concerns are questions for the reason and the origin of all being. In a way, these questions unite all of today's arts subjects. As an effect, though, the boundaries between arts often become blurred, all the more since psychology from the early ancient world until the 19th century has merely been regarded as a philosophical field. With the emancipation of psychology as a scientific discipline on its own, teachings were partly in opposition to the traditional way of thinking, if being based on empirical evidence rather than theoretical considerations. Thus, fundamentals of human psyche happen to become a somewhat delicate matter. With this paper I have touched philosophical and psychological problems using the example of B. F. Skinner's "Beyond Freedom and Dignity," trying to show the relationship and the margins of both fields. The author - Burrhus Frederick Skinner (1904-1990) - is regarded one of the most radical 'scientists' among all psychologists. Skinner counts for a distinguished representative of a psychological theory that strongly tries to separate psychological findings from anything experimentally unobservable - (American) behaviourism. Nevertheless, Skinner's book Beyond Freedom and Dignity of 1971 largely leaves out any deta

The New World of Educational Thought

BEYOND FREEDOM AND DIGNITY “ A REVOLUTIONARY MANIFESTO ” John Platt B. F. SKINNER's book , Beyond Freedom and Dignity , is a revolutionary manifesto . It proposes the design of a new society using new methods for improving the behavior ...

The New World of Educational Thought


B F Skinner

The same holds for Skinner's Beyond freedom and dignity ( 1971a ) : even if the arguments and the proposals exposed in the book have little basis in scientific analysis , there they are , and they are challenging enough not to leave ...

B  F  Skinner

B.F. Skinner has been praised as one of the most influential psychologists of the 20th century, but was also attacked by a variety of opponents within and outside the field of psychology.

Politics and Human Nature

92,93, 162 and Skinner, B. F., Beyond Freedom and Dignity, London, Cape, 1972 (originally published 1971), p. 101. Skinner, Beyond Freedom and Dignity, op.cit., p. 26. Skinner, Walden Two, op. cit., pp. 69, 114, 115; 32; 35, 148; 121; ...

Politics and Human Nature

Human nature is political, and this volume explains why and how. It is of interest to students of political thought and behaviour, as well as those studying the history of ideas and political philosophy. The subjects discussed in this book include the conceptions of human nature at the heart of political argument and theory; the identification of major theories of human nature and the functions they perform in epistemological and explanatory terms; the examination of key individual thinkers and major intellectual traditions, probing the origins and impact of each view of human nature and assessing their theoretical and practical strengths; as well as a practical orientation, focusing on specific areas of politics, to highlight the role played by often competing theories of human nature and so contrast their accuracy and efficacy. The conclusion brings into close contrast the separate theories of human nature as it applies to politics, throwing into sharp relief the major problems found in its varied form and usage, and pinpoints the prerequisites for the sound but fruitful study of politics and human nature.

Patty s Got a Gun

B. F. Skinner, Beyond Freedom and Dignity (New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1971), pp. 3, 138 (survival of mankind), 160, 19 (“traditional view”), 8–9 (“intentions, purposes”); Peter Caws, “Psychology without a Psyche,” New Republic 165 ...

Patty s Got a Gun

It was a story so bizarre it defied belief: in April 1974, twenty-year-old newspaper heiress Patricia Hearst robbed a San Francisco bank in the company of members of the Symbionese Liberation Army—who had kidnapped her a mere nine weeks earlier. But the robbery—and the spectacular 1976 trial that ended with Hearst’s criminal conviction—seemed oddly appropriate to the troubled mood of the nation, an instant exemplar of a turbulent era. With Patty’s Got a Gun, the first substantial reconsideration of Patty Hearst’s story in more than twenty-five years, William Graebner vividly re-creates the atmosphere of uncertainty and frustration of mid-1970s America. Drawing on copious media accounts of the robbery and trial—as well as cultural artifacts from glam rock to Invasion of the Body Snatchers—Graebner paints a compelling portrait of a nation confused and frightened by the upheavals of 1960s liberalism and beginning to tip over into what would become Reagan-era conservatism, with its invocations of individual responsibility and the heroic. Trapped in the middle of that shift, the affectless, zombielike, “brainwashed” Patty Hearst was a ready-made symbol of all that seemed to have gone wrong with the sixties—the inevitable result, some said, of rampant permissiveness, feckless elitism, the loss of moral clarity, and feminism run amok. By offering a fresh look at Patty Hearst and her trial—for the first time free from the agendas of the day, yet set fully in their cultural context—Patty’s Got a Gun delivers a nuanced portrait of both an unforgettable moment and an entire era, one whose repercussions continue to be felt today.