Beyond the Green Revolution

This book, which is the result of an intellectual odyssey, began as an attempt to explore and map the environmental and cross-cultural dimensions of the continuing spread of the green revolution-that package of high-yielding varieties of ...

Beyond the Green Revolution

This book, which is the result of an intellectual odyssey, began as an attempt to explore and map the environmental and cross-cultural dimensions of the continuing spread of the green revolution-that package of high-yielding varieties of grain, fertilizers, irrigation, and pesticides that constitutes the core of modern industrial agriculture. In the process of traversing the terrain of several intellectual traditions and cutting through various disciplinary forests and thickets, a number of striking observations were made-all leading to two sober ing conclusions. First, most intellectual maps dealing with agriculture fail to recognize it as the basic interface between human societies and their environment. Because of this, they are little better than the "flat earth" maps of earlier centuries in helping to understand global realities. Second, when agriculture is analyzed from a global perspec tive that takes evolution seriously, one sees that the ecological risks as well as the energy and social costs of modern industrial agriculture make it largely inappropriate for developing countries. Beyond that, one can see a great need within industrialized countries to develop less costly, less risky, and more sustainable agricultural alternatives. Early in the journey it became clear that conventional disciplinary approaches were inadequate to comprehend the scope and diversity of global agriculture and that a new multilevel approach was needed. It also became clear that any new approach would have to try to correct certain Western biases and blind spots.

Beyond the Green Revolution

" The second chapter, "Beyond the Green Revolution," considers the need for new crop varieties and technologies (including biotechnologies) but argues that tomorrow's innovations must be more consistent with regional agricultural traditions ...

Beyond the Green Revolution

After 20 years, the "green revolution" is generally referred to as a milestone in the international agricultural movement. The introduction of new varieties of wheat and rice, along with fertilizers, pesticides, and mechanized farm equipment has produced a dramatic increase in world food production. This paper assesses the successes of the green revolution in light of its effect upon third world countries. It cautions that the revolutionary gains in agricultural production have not been distributed evenly. This uneven distribution of productivity is discussed in the first chapter, "Productivity Reconsidered." The second chapter, "Beyond the Green Revolution," considers the need for new crop varieties and technologies (including biotechnologies) but argues that tomorrow's innovations must be more consistent with regional agricultural traditions. This approach will help to avoid some of the environmental and social costs associated with the agricultural technologies utilized during the green revolution. The third chapter, "Rediscovering Traditional Agriculture," examines the benefits and limitations of traditional methods of agriculture, indicating that these practices should provide the basis for new practices, rather than be swept aside as archaic. "Toward Appropriate Biotechnology" discusses some of the possible contributions offered by biotechnology as tools for more efficient and sustainable agriculture. The document concludes with a call for additional research in sustainable agriculture productivity. (TW)

Beyond the Green Revolution

This book, which is the result of an intellectual odyssey, began as an attempt to explore and map the environmental and cross-cultural dimensions of the continuing spread of the green revolution-that package of high-yielding varieties of ...

Beyond the Green Revolution

This book, which is the result of an intellectual odyssey, began as an attempt to explore and map the environmental and cross-cultural dimensions of the continuing spread of the green revolution-that package of high-yielding varieties of grain, fertilizers, irrigation, and pesticides that constitutes the core of modern industrial agriculture. In the process of traversing the terrain of several intellectual traditions and cutting through various disciplinary forests and thickets, a number of striking observations were made-all leading to two sober ing conclusions. First, most intellectual maps dealing with agriculture fail to recognize it as the basic interface between human societies and their environment. Because of this, they are little better than the "flat earth" maps of earlier centuries in helping to understand global realities. Second, when agriculture is analyzed from a global perspec tive that takes evolution seriously, one sees that the ecological risks as well as the energy and social costs of modern industrial agriculture make it largely inappropriate for developing countries. Beyond that, one can see a great need within industrialized countries to develop less costly, less risky, and more sustainable agricultural alternatives. Early in the journey it became clear that conventional disciplinary approaches were inadequate to comprehend the scope and diversity of global agriculture and that a new multilevel approach was needed. It also became clear that any new approach would have to try to correct certain Western biases and blind spots.

Rural Asia

The main results and recommendations contained in the five volumes have been included in the overview and should prove useful to those concerned with improving the economic and social conditions of rural populations in Asia through ...

Rural Asia

An economic transformation has occurred in much of rural Asia during the last 2 decades. Large parts of the region have made remarkable progress with substantial gains in food security, per capita income, quality of life, and poverty reduction. Yet, rural Asia remains home to 700 million people living in poverty, many of whom have no access to safe water and sanitation. To explore new opportunities and challenges facing rural society in Asia, a study of rural Asia was undertaken by ADB. The main results and recommendations contained in the five volumes have been included in the overview and should prove useful to those concerned with improving the economic and social conditions of rural populations in Asia through sustainable development.

San Bartolome

San Bartolome


Towards Sustainability

This work investigates through participant observation, interviews, censuses, and work diaries how small producers have been able to produce these high yields and examines the ways in which these small producers perceive, and the ways they ...

Towards Sustainability

Small producers in Costa Rica have achieved high agricultural yields by intensive exploitation of slopes and heavy use of agrochemicals, practices that have damaged the environment and reduced yields. This work investigates through participant observation, interviews, censuses, and work diaries how small producers have been able to produce these high yields and examines the ways in which these small producers perceive, and the ways they respond to, the environmental problems that their practice has created. Small producers in Costa Rica benefit from services given by coffee buyers, including credit with no collateral and payments for coffee scheduled throughout the year. When the price of coffee is good, these services allow small producers to meet production costs and household needs. However, small producers are able to survive periods of low prices by providing for their household needs through production of subsistence crops, particularly beans, using low cost traditional systems. Thus, production of subsistence crops supports and underwrites the production of high value export crops like coffee.

Technological and Social Dimensions of the Green Revolution

From Green Revolution to biorevolution: some observations on the changing technological bases of economic transformation in the Third World. Economic development and cultural change, 34, 31–55. Chambers, R., 2010. Beyond the Green ...

Technological and Social Dimensions of the Green Revolution

Rising concerns about agricultural productivity and food security in rapidly changing economic and environmental contexts have led to renewed interest in agricultural development. But the extent to which new policies and programs will enable socially just and environmentally sustainable futures for rural communities remains a matter of intense debate. This book contributes to such debates by critically examining the intersection of agricultural histories, heterogeneous social contexts and new technological developments in rural communities across the Global South. It shows how experiences of the previous Green Revolution can inform new agricultural programs and enable equitable and participatory development in rural places. Through close engagement with rural communities, this book ensures that rural voices become part of the debate on agricultural development and suggests pathways for building on the gains of the Green Revolution without necessarily repeating its problematic social, technological and environmental aspects. This book was published as a special issue of the International Journal of Agricultural Sustainability.

Dodging Extinction

Henry I. Miller, 2012, “Norman Borlaug: The Genius behind the Green Revolution,” Forbes (January 18, 2012), www.forbes.com/sites/henrymiller/2012 /01/18/norman-borlaug-the-genius-behind-the-green-revolution/. 49.

Dodging Extinction

Paleobiologist Anthony D. Barnosky weaves together evidence from the deep past and the present to alert us to the looming Sixth Mass Extinction and to offer a practical, hopeful plan for avoiding it. Writing from the front lines of extinction research, Barnosky tells the overarching story of geologic and evolutionary history and how it informs the way humans inhabit, exploit, and impact Earth today. He presents compelling evidence that unless we rethink how we generate the power we use to run our global ecosystem, where we get our food, and how we make our money, we will trigger what would be the sixth great extinction on Earth, with dire consequences. Optimistic that we can change this ominous forecast if we act now, Barnosky provides clear-cut strategies to guide the planet away from global catastrophe. In many instances the necessary technology and know-how already exist and are being applied to crucial issues around human-caused climate change, feeding the worldÕs growing population, and exploiting natural resources. Deeply informed yet accessibly written, Dodging Extinction is nothing short of a guidebook for saving the planet.

Hybrid

Perkins's Geopolitics and the Green Revolution is a good general account that contextualizes the events in wider plant breeding ... The story behind IR- 8 and other earlier International Rice Research Institute– bred rices is covered in ...

Hybrid

"Noel Kingsbury reveals that even those imaginary perfect foods are themselves far from anything that could properly be called natural, rather, they represent the end of a millennia-long history of selective breeding and hybridization. Starting his story at the birth of agriculture, Kingsbury traces the history of human attempts to make plants more reliable, productive, and nutritiousa story that owes as much to accident and error as to innovation and experiment. Drawing on historical and scientific accounts, as well as a rich trove of anecdotes, Kingsbury shows how scientists, amateur breeders, and countless anonymous farmers and gardeners slowly caused the evolutionary pressures of nature to be supplanted by those of human needs and thus led us from sparse wild grasses to succulent corn cobs, and from mealy, white wild carrots to the juicy vegetables we enjoy today. At the same time, Kingsbury reminds us that contemporary controversies over the Green Revolution and genetically modified crops are not new, plant breeding has always had a political dimension."--Publisher's description.

The green Revolution and Traditional Systems of Agriculture and Irrigation in Bali

Seeds of Want: Social and Economic Tmpli cat ions of the Green Revolution. Oxford, Clarendon Paress, 1980. ... Wolf, Edward C, "Beyond the Green Revolution: New Approaches for Third World Agriculture." Worldwatch Paper 73, October 1986, ...

The  green Revolution  and Traditional Systems of Agriculture and Irrigation in Bali


Beyond the Green Revolution

Beyond the Green Revolution


Millions Fed

The Asian Green Revolution lifted many people out of poverty, jump-started economic growth, and saved large areas of forest, wetlands, and other fragile lands from conversion to cropland. In short, the investments and policies that ...

Millions Fed

Humanity has made enormous progress in the past 50 years toward eliminating hunger and malnutrition. Some five billion people--more than 80 percent of the world's population--have enough food to live healthy, productive lives. Agricultural development has contributed significantly to these gains, while also fostering economic growth and poverty reduction in some of the world's poorest countries.

Staying Alive

54 As the myth of the miracle seed gets exposed , interna tional agencies are talking of going ' beyond the green revolution.'55 The post - green revolution era could be based on a recovery of the feminine principle in agriculture ...

Staying Alive

Examining the position of women in relation to nature - the forests, the food chain and water supplies - the author links the violation of nature with the violation and marginalization of women in the Third World. One result is that the impact of science, technology and politics, along with the workings of the economy itself, are inherently exploitative. Every area of human activity marginalizes and burdens both women and nature.There is only one path, Vandana Shiva suggests, to survival and liberation for nature, women and men, and that is the ecological path of harmony, sustainability and diversity. She explores the unique place of women in the environment of India in particular, both as its saviours and as victims of maldevelopment.Her analysis is an innovative statement of the challenge that women in ecology movements are creating and she shows how their efforts constitute a non-violent and humanly inclusive alternative to the dominant paradigm of contemporary scientific and development thought.

The Global Environmental Protection Act of 1988

For assessments of the shortcomings of the green revolution see Kenneth A. Dahlberg , Beyond the Green Revolution : The Ecology & Politics of Global Agricultural Development ( New York , NY , Plenum Publishing Corporation , 1979 ) ...

The Global Environmental Protection Act of 1988


Agrarian Crossings

For the best recent summary of the green revolution's profound human and ecological consequences, see Raj Patel, ... 1–2 (1972): 177–86; Kenneth A. Dahlberg, Beyond the Green Revolution: The Ecology and Politics of Global Agricultural ...

Agrarian Crossings

In the 1930s and 1940s, rural reformers in the United States and Mexico waged unprecedented campaigns to remake their countrysides in the name of agrarian justice and agricultural productivity. Agrarian Crossings tells the story of how these campaigns were conducted in dialogue with one another as reformers in each nation came to exchange models, plans, and strategies with their equivalents across the border. Dismantling the artificial boundaries that can divide American and Latin American history, Tore Olsson shows how the agrarian histories of both regions share far more than we realize. He traces the connections between the US South and the plantation zones of Mexico, places that suffered parallel problems of environmental decline, rural poverty, and gross inequities in land tenure. Bringing this tumultuous era vividly to life, he describes how Roosevelt’s New Deal drew on Mexican revolutionary agrarianism to shape its program for the rural South. Olsson also looks at how the US South served as the domestic laboratory for the Rockefeller Foundation’s “green revolution” in Mexico—which would become the most important Third World development campaign of the twentieth century—and how the Mexican government attempted to replicate the hydraulic development of the Tennessee Valley Authority after World War II. Rather than a comparative history, Agrarian Crossings is an innovative history of comparisons and the ways they affected policy, moved people, and reshaped the landscape.

New Scientist

Inventing the wheel Beyond the green revolution by Kenneth A. Dahlberg, Plenum Press, pp 256, £11-54 World ... Thus in Britain cereal yields have doubled in the past 50 years largely as the result of growing new varieties able to use ...

New Scientist

New Scientist magazine was launched in 1956 "for all those men and women who are interested in scientific discovery, and in its industrial, commercial and social consequences". The brand's mission is no different today - for its consumers, New Scientist reports, explores and interprets the results of human endeavour set in the context of society and culture.

Ecology and Power in the Age of Empire

Among the swelling chorus of Green Revolution critics in the 1960s and 1970s were the voices of many ex-colonial ... Certainly they had little direct influence on policy, which was shaped by a range of factors beyond agronomy per se.

Ecology and Power in the Age of Empire

Ecology and Power in the Age of Empire provides the first wide-ranging environmental history of the heyday of European imperialism, from the late nineteenth century to the end of the colonial era. It focuses on the ecological dimensions of the explosive growth of tropical commodity production, global trade, and modern resource management-transformations that still visibly shape our world today-and how they were related to broader social, cultural, and political developments in Europe's colonies. Covering the overseas empires of all the major European powers, Corey Ross argues that tropical environments were not merely a stage on which conquest and subjugation took place, but were an essential part of the colonial project, profoundly shaping the imperial enterprise even as they were shaped by it. The story he tells is not only about the complexities of human experience, but also about people's relationship with the ecosystems in which they were themselves embedded: the soil, water, plants, and animals that were likewise a part of Europe's empire. Although it shows that imperial conquest rarely represented a sudden bout of ecological devastation, it nonetheless demonstrates that modern imperialism marked a decisive and largely negative milestone for the natural environment. By relating the expansion of modern empire, global trade, and mass consumption to the momentous ecological shifts that they entailed, this book provides a historical perspective on the vital nexus of social, political, and environmental issues that we face in the twenty-first-century world.