Biogeography in a Changing World

The first book to fully define this rapidly emerging subdiscipline, Biogeography in a Changing World elucidates the principles of biogeography and paves the way for its evolution into a stand-alone field. Drawin

Biogeography in a Changing World

Hampered by a confusing plethora of approaches and methods, biogeography is often treated as an adjunct to other areas of study. The first book to fully define this rapidly emerging subdiscipline, Biogeography in a Changing World elucidates the principles of biogeography and paves the way for its evolution into a stand-alone field. Drawing on contributions from leading proponents of differing methods within biogeography, the book clearly defines the differing, sometimes conflicting, perspectives in the field and their correspondingly different methodological approaches. This gives readers the opportunity to refocus on a range of issues including the role of biological processes such as vicariance, dispersal and extinction in biogeographical explanation, the possibility of biogeographical pattern, and the role of geological reconstructions in biogeographic explanation. The book also explores the discipline’s current relationship with other disciplines and discusses potential developments.

Patterns of Life

These are a few no evil can destroy. of the questions that have intrigued observers of nature Alexander von Humboldt, 1805 and the Earth.

Patterns of Life

Insight into universal nature provides an intellectual life? Why are so many plants and animals, especially delight and sense of freedom that no blows of fate and freshwater species, at risk of extinction? These are a few no evil can destroy. of the questions that have intrigued observers of nature Alexander von Humboldt, 1805 and the Earth. By studying the Earth's patterns of life, students of biogeography ultimately ponder some of the ... on that small spot, that little blue and white thing, most basic questions about life and the cosmos. is everything that means anything to you - all of history and music and poetry and art and death and birth and love, tears, joy, games, all of it on that little Historical roots of biogeography spot out there that you can cover with your thumb. The topic of biogeography has its roots in the work of And you realize from that perspective that you've Alexander von Humboldt, the recognized father of plant changed, that there's something new there, that the geography (Detwyler 1969, Browne 1983). From its relationship is no longer what it was.

Patterns of Life

Patterns of Life


Biogeography

The Phanerozoic record of global sea‐level change. Science 2005; 310: 1293–1295. 19. Mielke HW. Patterns of Life. Biogeography in a Changing World. Boston: Unwin Hyman, 1989. 20. Saleeby JB. Accretionary tectonics of the North American ...

Biogeography

Through nine successful editions, and for over 45 years, Biogeography: An Ecological and Evolutionary Approach has provided a thorough and comprehensive exploration of the varied scientific disciplines and research that are essential to understanding the subject. The text, noted for its clear and engaging style of writing, has been praised for its solid background in historical biogeography and basic biology, that is enhanced and illuminated by discussions of current research. This new edition incorporates the exciting changes of the recent years and presents a thoughtful exploration of the research and controversies that have transformed our understanding of the biogeography of the world. New themes and topics in this tenth edition include: Next generation genetic technologies and their use in historical biogeography, phylogeography and population genomics Biogeographical databases and biodiversity information systems, which are becoming increasingly important for biogeographical research An introduction to functional biogeography and its applications to community assembly, diversity gradients and the analysis of ecosystem functioning Updated case studies focusing on island biogeography, using the latest phylogenetic studies Biogeography: An Ecological and Evolutionary Approach reveals how the patterns of life that we see today have been created by the two great Engines of the Planet: the Geological Engine, plate tectonics, which alters the conditions of life on the planet, and the Biological Engine, evolution, which responds to these changes by creating new forms and patterns of life.

Global Biogeography

This book significantly expands the coverage of this subject given by its predecessor Biogeography and Plate Tectonics (1987).

Global Biogeography

This book significantly expands the coverage of this subject given by its predecessor Biogeography and Plate Tectonics (1987). Global Biogeography traces global changes in geography and biology from the Precambrian to the Recent (with worldwide coverage in chronological order); examines the evolutionary effects of the major extinctions, and discusses contemporary biogeographic regions within the context of their historic origins. It is now apparent that the biotas of the various biogeographical regions have had, and still maintain, a dynamic relationship with one another; much more than was previously thought. This is shown to be true for all three of the earth's primary habitats; marine, terrestrial and freshwater (as is clearly demonstrated in this volume). The book is splendidly illustrated with 122 text figures, an extensive bibliography, index, together with a set of biogeographic maps illustrating continental and terrain outlines from the mid-Cambrian to the Recent. University students (both advanced undergraduate and graduate level) will find it an excellent text book. For professionals in Biogeography this is a convenient reference work.

Echinoderms in a Changing World

Living on the edge of two changing worlds: Forecasting the responses of rocky intertidal ecosystems to climate change ... Patterns of hsp gene expression in ectothermic marine organisms on small to large biogeographic scales.

Echinoderms in a Changing World

Echinoderms are an ancient and diverse group of marine animals with a rich fossil record. They occur abundantly in all modern oceans and at all depths, where they contribute importantly to patterns in biodiversity and to the structure and functioning of marine systems. It is therefore vital to understand how they will respond to a rapidly cha

Biogeography of Microscopic Organisms

A classification of the biogeographical provinces of the world. ... The Geographical Distribution of Animals: With a Study of the Relations of Living and Extinct Faunas as Elucidating the Past Changes of the Earth's Surface.

Biogeography of Microscopic Organisms

Bringing together the viewpoints of leading experts in taxonomy, ecology and biogeography of different taxa, this book synthesises discussion surrounding the so-called 'everything is everywhere' hypothesis. It addresses the processes that generate spatial patterns of diversity and biogeography in organisms that can potentially be cosmopolitan. The contributors discuss questions such as: are microorganisms (e.g. prokaryotes, protists, algae, yeast and microscopic fungi, plants and animals) really cosmopolitan in their distribution? What are the biological properties that allow such potential distribution? Are there processes that would limit their distribution? Are microorganisms intrinsically different from macroscopic ones? What can microorganisms tell us about the generalities of biogeography? Can they be used for experimental biogeography? Written for graduate students and academic researchers, the book promotes a more complete understanding of the spatial patterns and the general processes in biogeography.

Conservation Biogeography

Riddle, B.R. & Hafner, DJ. (2006) Phylogeography in historical biogeography: investigating the biogeographic histories of populations, species, and young biotas. Biogeography in a changing world (ed. by MC. Ebach and RS. Tangney), pp.

Conservation Biogeography

CONSERVATION BIOGEOGRAPHY The Earth’s ecosystems are in the midst of an unprecedented period of change as a result of human action. Many habitats have been completely destroyed or divided into tiny fragments, others have been transformed through the introduction of new species, or the extinction of native plants and animals, while anthropogenic climate change now threatens to completely redraw the geographic map of life on this planet. The urgent need to understand and prescribe solutions to this complicated and interlinked set of pressing conservation issues has lead to the transformation of the venerable academic discipline of biogeography – the study of the geographic distribution of animals and plants. The newly emerged sub-discipline of conservation biogeography uses the conceptual tools and methods of biogeography to address real world conservation problems and to provide predictions about the fate of key species and ecosystems over the next century. This book provides the first comprehensive review of the field in a series of closely interlinked chapters addressing the central issues within this exciting and important subject.

Evolutionary Biogeography

In Biogeography in a changing world, ed. M. C. Ebach and R. S. Tangney, 95–115. Boca Raton, Fla.: CRC Press. Haydon, D. T., B. I. Crother, and E. R. Pianka. 1994. New directions on biogeography? Trends in Ecology and Evolution 9:403–406 ...

Evolutionary Biogeography

"Rather than favoring only one approach, Juan J. Morrone proposes a comprehensive treatment of the developments and theories of evolutionary biogeography. Evolutionary biogeography uses distributional, phylogenetic, molecular, and fossil data to assess the historical changes that have produced current biotic patterns. Panbiogeography, parsimony analysis of endemicity, cladistic biogeography, and phylogeography are the four recent and most common approaches. Many conceive of these methods as representing different "schools," but Morrone shows how each addresses different questions in the various steps of an evolutionary biogeographical analysis. Panbiogeography and parsimony analysis of endemicity are useful for identifying biotic components or areas of endemism. Cladistic biogeography uses phylogenetic data to determine the relationships between these biotic components. Further information on fossils, phylogeographic patterns, and molecular clocks can be incorporated to identify different cenocrons. Finally, available geological knowledge can help construct a geobiotic scenario that may explain how analyzed areas were put into contact and how the biotic components and cenocrons inhabiting them evolved. Morrone compares these methods and employs case studies to make it clear which is best for the question at hand. Set problems, discussion sections, and glossaries further enhance classroom use."--Publisher's description.

Comparative Biogeography

Discovering and Classifying Biogeographical Patterns of a Dynamic Earth Lynne Parenti, Malte Ebach. Grande, L., and W.E. Bemis. 1991. ... Biogeography in a changing world (pp. 83–84). Fifth Biennial Conference of the Systematics ...

Comparative Biogeography

To unravel the complex shared history of the Earth and its life forms, biogeographers analyze patterns of biodiversity, species distribution, and geological history. So far, the field of biogeography has been fragmented into divergent systematic and evolutionary approaches, with no overarching or unifying research theme or method. In this text, Lynne Parenti and Malte Ebach address this discord and outline comparative tools to unify biogeography. Rooted in phylogenetic systematics, this comparative biogeographic approach offers a comprehensive empirical framework for discovering and deciphering the patterns and processes of the distribution of life on Earth. The authors cover biogeography from its fundamental ideas to the most effective ways to implement them. Real-life examples illustrate concepts and problems, including the first comparative biogeographical analysis of the Indo-West Pacific, an introduction to biogeographical concepts rooted in the earth sciences, and the integration of phylogeny, evolution and earth history.

Mammalogy

In historical biogeography, scientists follow the chronicle of changes in the distribution of organisms through time, ... of these regions reflect the history of diversification of the mammalian groups in those parts of the world.

Mammalogy

Mammalogy is the study of mammals from the diverse biological viewpoints of structure, function, evolutionary history, behavior, ecology, classification, and economics. Thoroughly updated, the Sixth Edition of Mammalogy explains and clarifies the subject as a unified whole. The text begins by defining mammals and summarizing their origins. It moves on to discuss the orders and families of mammals with comprehensive coverage on the fossil history, current distribution, morphological characteristics, and basic behavior and ecology of each family of mammals. The third part of the text progresses to discuss special topics such as mammalian echolocation, physiology, behavior, ecology, and zoogeography. The text concludes with two additional chapters, previously available online, that cover mammalian domestication and mammalian disease and zoonoses.

The SAGE Handbook of Biogeography

... Global Ecology and Biogeography, 8: 433–41. Riddle, B.R., and Hafner, D.J. (2004) 'The past and future roles of phylogeography in historical biogeography. ... Biogeography in a Changing World. Boca Raton, FL: CRC Press. pp. 161–76.

The SAGE Handbook of Biogeography

"A superb resource for understanding the diversity of the modern discipline of biogeography, and its history and future, especially within geography departments. I expect to refer to it often." - Professor Sally Horn, University of Tennessee "As you browse through this fine book you will be struck by the diverse topics that biogeographers investigate and the many research methods they use.... Biogeography is interdisciplinary, and a commonly-voiced concern is that one biogeographer may not readily understand another's research findings. A handbook like this is important for synthesising, situating, explaining and evaluating a large literature, and pointing the reader to informative publications." - Geographical Research "A valuable contribution in both a research and teaching context. If you are biologically trained, it provides an extensive look into the geographical tradition of biogeography, covering some topics that may be less familiar to those with an evolution/ecology background. Alternatively, if you are a geography student, researcher, or lecturer, it will provide a useful reference and will be invaluable to the non-biogeographer who suddenly has the teaching of an introductory biogeography course thrust upon them." - Adam C. Algar, Frontiers of Biogeography The SAGE Handbook of Biogeography is a manual for scoping the past, present and future of biogeography that enable readers to consider, where relevant, how similar biogeographical issues are tackled by researchers in different 'schools'. In line with the concept of all SAGE Handbooks, this is a retrospective and prospective overview of biogeography that will: Consider the main areas of biogeography researched by geographers Detail a global perspective by incorporating the work of different schools of biogeographers Ecplore the divergent evolution of biogeography as a discipline and consider how this diversity can be harnessed Examine the interdisciplinary debates that biogeographers are contributing to within geography and the biological sciences. Aimed at an international audience of research students, academics, researchers and practitioners in biogeography, the text will attract interest from environmental scientists, ecologists, biologists and geographers alike.

The Theory of Island Biogeography Revisited

Evolution of specific and genetic diversity during ontogeny of island floras: The importance of understanding process for interpreting island biogeographic patterns. In Biogeography in a Changing World, ed. M. C. Ebach and R. S. Tangney ...

The Theory of Island Biogeography Revisited

Robert H. MacArthur and Edward O. Wilson's The Theory of Island Biogeography, first published by Princeton in 1967, is one of the most influential books on ecology and evolution to appear in the past half century. By developing a general mathematical theory to explain a crucial ecological problem--the regulation of species diversity in island populations--the book transformed the science of biogeography and ecology as a whole. In The Theory of Island Biogeography Revisited, some of today's most prominent biologists assess the continuing impact of MacArthur and Wilson's book four decades after its publication. Following an opening chapter in which Wilson reflects on island biogeography in the 1960s, fifteen chapters evaluate and demonstrate how the field has extended and confirmed--as well as challenged and modified--MacArthur and Wilson's original ideas. Providing a broad picture of the fundamental ways in which the science of island biogeography has been shaped by MacArthur and Wilson's landmark work, The Theory of Island Biogeography Revisited also points the way toward exciting future research.

Pure and Applied Biogeography

Evolution. 2012;66:135-146 Sanmartin I. Event-Based biogeography: Integrating patterns, processes, and time. In: Ebach MC, Tangney R, editors. Biogeography in a Changing World. Taylor and Francis, Boca Raton, FL; 2007. pp.

Pure and Applied Biogeography

This book, Pure and Applied Biogeography, gives a very interesting report and overview about the frontiers of such parts of recent biogeographical research, which plays important roles in solving our most pressing global problems (biodiversity crisis, climate change, water issues, and sustainable agriculture). Our book consists of three sections: "Introduction", "Pure Biogeography and Global Patterns" and "Applied Biogeography and Regional Issues." After the introductory chapter, which is about the main branches and aims of biogeography in service of solving global problems, - we can find three chapters as parts of the first section. First chapter in this section is in close relation with the origin of biodiversity and conservation. The second and third chapters are about the biogeograhical aspects of climate change and biodiversity. In the second section of this book three applied biogeographical chapters can be found, which are related to agriculture, theoretical background of biological plant protection against herbivores, and regional patterns in ecological biogeography.

Assumptions Inhibiting Progress in Comparative Biology

In Biogeography in a changing world, ed. ... Comparative biogeography: Discovering and classifying biogeographical patterns of a dynamic Earth. ... The explanatory power of biogeographical patterns: A reply to de Bruyn et al.

Assumptions Inhibiting Progress in Comparative Biology

This book is a thought-provoking assessment of assumptions inhibiting progress in comparative biology. The volume is inspired by a list generated years earlier by Donn Rosen, one of the most influential, innovative and productive comparative biologists of the latter 20th century. His list has assumed almost legendary status among comparative evolutionary biologists. Surprisingly many of the obstructing assumptions implicated by Rosen remain relevant today. Any comparative biologist hoping to avoid such assumptions in their own research will benefit from this introspective volume.

Plant Geography of Chile

In: Ebach MC, Tangney RS, (eds) Biogeography in a changing world. Systematics Association special volumes. CRC Press, Boca Raton, FL, pp 171–192 McDowall RM (2008) Process and pattern in the biogeography of New Zealand – a global ...

Plant Geography of Chile

The first and so far only Plant Geography of Chile was written about 100 years ago, since when many things have changed: plants have been renamed and reclassified; taxonomy and systematics have experienced deep changes as have biology, geography, and biogeography. The time is therefore ripe for a new look at Chile’s plants and their distribution. Focusing on three key issues – botany/systematics, geography and biogeographical analysis – this book presents a thoroughly updated synthesis both of Chilean plant geography and of the different approaches to studying it. Because of its range – from the neotropics to the temperate sub-Antarctic – Chile’s flora provides a critical insight into evolutionary patterns, particularly in relation to the distribution along the latitudinal profiles and the global geographical relationships of the country’s genera. The consequences of these relations for the evolution of the Chilean Flora are discussed. This book will provide a valuable resource for both graduate students and researchers in botany, plant taxonomy and systematics, biogeography, evolutionary biology and plant conservation.

Biogeography

After a particular overview of the history of biogeography in Chapter 1, in Chapter 2 we will have an intensive study of the challenges and perspectives of the main analytical approaches used in biogeography, an always-changing world.

Biogeography

The recent progress in analytical methods, aided by bringing in a wide range of other disciplines, opens up the study to a broader field, which means that biogeography now goes far beyond a simple description of the distribution of living species on Earth. Originating with Alexander von Humboldt, biogeography is a discipline in which ecologists and evolutionists aim to understand the way that living species are organized in connection with their environments. Today, as we face major challenges such as global warming, massive species extinction and devastating pandemics, biogeography offers hypotheses and explanations that may help to provide solutions. This book presents as wide an overview as possible of the different fields that biogeography interacts with. Sixteen authors from all over the world offer different approaches based on their specific areas of knowledge and experience; thus, we intend to illustrate the vast number of diverse aspects covered by biogeography.

Palaeogeography and Palaeobiogeography Biodiversity in Space and Time

Phylogeography. in. historical. biogeography:. Investigating.the.biogeographic.histories.of.populations,.species,.and.young.biotas.. In. Biogeography in a Changing World. (eds.. M.C.. Ebach. and. R.S.. Tangney), The. Systematics.

Palaeogeography and Palaeobiogeography  Biodiversity in Space and Time

Biogeography represents one of the most complex and challenging aspects of macroevolutionary research, requiring input from both the earth and life sciences. Palaeogeographic reconstruction is frequently carried out by researchers with backgrounds in geology and palaeontology, who are less likely to be familiar with the latest biogeographic techniques: conversely, biogeographic methods are often devised by neontologists who may be less familiar with the fossil record, stratigraphy, and palaeogeography. Palaeogeography and Palaeobiogeography: Biodiversity in Space and Time bridges the gap between these two communities of researchers, who work on the same issues but typically use different types of data. The book covers a range of topics, and reflects some of the major overall questions in the field such as: Which approaches are best suited to reconstructing biogeographic histories under a range of circumstances? How do we maximize the use of organismal and earth sciences data to improve our understanding of events in earth history? How well do analytical techniques devised for researching the biogeography of extant organisms perform in the fossil record? Can alternative biodiversity metrics, particularly those based on morphological measurements, enhance our understanding of biogeographic patterns and processes? This book approaches palaeobiogeography with coverage of technological applications and detailed case studies. It spans a wide selection of overlapping and integrative disciplines, including evolutionary theory, vicariance biogeography, extinctions, and the philosophical aspects of palaeogeography. It also highlights new technological innovations and applications for research. Presenting a unique discussion of both palaeogeography and palaeobiogeography in one volume, this book focuses both historically and philosophically on the interface between geology, climate, and organismal distribution.

Biogeography

The conservational commitment of biogeography in a rapidly changing world must adjust to such changes and itself be dynamic and forward looking . New directions for biogeography include ( a ) innovation in palynological research which ...

Biogeography

Biogeography has been one of the great growth areas in geography in recent years, with much new research work and many new developments taking place. This book presents an authoritative, up-to-date, international review of all the major biogeographical themes. The chapters define each theme and its place within biogeography and consider the methods of study adopted. Each chapter then assesses recent trends and the latest state of the art, and concludes by examining where future developments are likely. Many case-studies and examples are provided, from throughout the world, including North America.

Mammalogy

Phylogeography in historical biogeography: investigating the biogeographic histories of populations, species, and young biotas, 161–176, in Biogeography in a Changing World (MC Ebach & RS Tangney, eds.). CRC Press, Boca Raton, FL.

Mammalogy

Mammalogy is the study of mammals from the diverse biological viewpoints of structure, function, evolutionary history, behavior, ecology, classification, and economics. Newly revised and updated, the fifth edition of Mammalogy aims to explain and clarify the subject as a unified whole. In recent years we have witnessed significant changes in the taxonomy of mammals. The authors have kept pace with such changes in the field and have revised each chapter to reflect the most current data available. New pedagogical elements, including chapter outlines and further reading sections, help readers grasp key concepts and explore additional content on their own. Two new chapters on domestication and mammal diseases are available on the Mammalogy website.